We’re very excited to announce this new feature!

At the top of all pages (such as your Nav Home Page) you will see a new search box that says “Name on Watchlist.”

This enables you to quickly jump to any profile on your Watchlist.

When you first click in the box you may notice a message that says “One moment …”. This should almost immediately change to “Ready to Search Watchlist.” But if your Watchlist is large it may take a couple seconds. (And if your Watchlist is over the recommended 5,000-profile limit it may not work.)

You can enter any first or last name from your Watchlist. As you type, suggestions will appear. Clicking a name will send you to the person’s profile.

Matching will work for Short Names as well as the full formal Long Names you will see. Therefore, for example, you may be able to enter “Mike” to find “Michael”, “Jim” to find “James”, etc.

Matching will also work for birth and death years, e.g. you can enter “1819” to see people on your Watchlist who were born or died in 1819. It will not work for birth or death locations. For this and any other advanced search functionality you can use the main search engine with the option to limit the search to your Watchlist.

Isn’t this great?

Please post here if you notice any problems or have questions or comments.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 6, 2018
Contact: Eowyn Langholf, eowyn@wikitree.com

72-Hour Scan-a-Thon

Genealogists are Invited to Participate in Scanning Marathon

December 6, 2018: On the weekend of January 11-14, 2019, WikiTree and GeneaBloggersTRIBE will kick off the new year by hosting a 72-hour image scanning marathon. Genealogists and family historians from around the world are invited to participate.

The goal of the Scan-a-Thon is to scan and upload photos and other items such as letters, postcards, funeral cards, and primary documents. Like a marathon, this is a competition to see who can do the most, but most participants won’t be serious competitors. Most will be doing it for the sake of preserving family history.

To add to the fun and collaborative atmosphere, participants will be organized into teams by geography and genealogical interest, such as Team Acadia, Nor’Easters, Windsor Warriors, Flying Dutchmen and Legacy Heirs.

Live chats will be hosted every few hours during the three-day event for participants to cheer each other on. During every chat a Scan-a-Thon t-shirt will be given away to a randomly-drawn participant who has registered in advance on WikiTree.

“Photos and documents can truly enhance our research, giving a face and details to our ancestors and their lives that we might not otherwise have,” says WikiTree “Forest Elf” Eowyn Langholf. “This is why we’re encouraging everyone to join us in preserving this important part of our family history.”

Volunteers can participate during the 72-hour period by scanning photos and documents in their collection and uploading them to the Internet. Members of WikiTree can register here.  Non-WikiTreers can sign up here.  If you are a blogger and would like to participate, contact eowyn@wikitree.com.

WikiTree has been growing since 2008. Community members privately collaborate with close family members on modern family history and publicly collaborate with other genealogists on deep ancestry. Since all the private and public profiles are connected on the same system this process is growing a single family tree that will eventually connect us all and thereby make it free and easy for anyone to discover their roots. See http://www.WikiTree.com.

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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Rick.

Rick San Soucie became a WikiTreer in February of 2012. He is active in several projects including Quebecois and French Roots and he enjoys participating in the Data Doctors Challenges.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

San Soucie and its variants; many Quebecois names (Biron, Saillant, Sturm, Benoit, Brunnelle) that I am finding in my ancestors; Molm and Nusbaum.

What are some of the locations you are researching?

Quebec; Hudson Valley New York, New England; Minnesota; Sioux City, Iowa.

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

I first got interested in genealogy and family history when, in high school, I “interviewed” my paternal grandfather and started learning about our family history. Several years later I was lucky enough to visit the LDS library out in Salt Lake City, where I spent hours navigating the stacks of books on Canadian Genealogy.  I fell in love.

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

William James, who appears to be my oldest ancestor with the Sansoucy name.  He came from England to Quebec in the 1600’s.

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

I have started research the Desloge family, who I grew up near in St. Louis.  They have a storied history, back to France, that I want to link to the WikiTree global family.

If you could pick one person in history to be related to, who would it be and why?

I think it would be nice to be related to Nicholas Copernicus.  He was an astronomer, physician, economist, diplomat, classics scholar and jurist.  He was crucial in the development of the theory that the earth rotated around the sun.  I studied both Physics and Economics in college.

What are some of your interests outside of genealogy?

I love to cook, whether for my wife and our family of seven children, or for large groups (of 100 people or more).  I also enjoy travelling, especially to see family scattered across the country.

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing? If you’re  involved in a project(s), tell us about how you participate in it.

I joined WikiTree in 2012, but was basically inactive until early 2018, right after I had my DNA testing conducted.  I have worked on my family ancestors, building profiles and documenting sources for them. I am particularly interested in my Quebec family, using the Drouin documentation as a primary source of information.  As I build my Quebecois history, I am finding I need to learn about the French families they came from, so I expect to expand my knowledge of French genealogy. I am also participating in a number of the Data Doctor Challenges, and the recent Source-A-Thon.  I like being able to contribute to the overall health of the WikiTree profiles. In the future, I would also like to get involved in the support and care of the WikiTree system.

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

I enjoy using the Relationship to Me function, displaying how I am related to other profiles.  I like the TAGs feature on my profile, which allows me to customize my daily feed. I also admire the efforts of Aleš Trtnik and his team who are constantly working to improve the quality of the WikiTree database.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

In the Error List Suggestions used for Data Doctor Challenges, it would be nice to show, on each line that displays, when a profile was last updated, real time.  This would allow a user to skip a recently updated profile when working through the suggestion list.  I find I often go into a profile to make a change, only to find that someone has already modified the profile.  The real-time update would allow me to bypass completed profiles.

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

I have found my sourcing has improved tremendously since working in WikiTree. And my French has improved as I read more and more Quebec documentation and genealogies.

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

Read the WikiTree Honor Code; Read the WikiTree Help Files; Read the WikiTree Honor Code; Learn how to source; Read the WikiTree Honor Code; Find a WikiTreer to mentor you; Read the WikiTree Honor Code; Participate in Challenges; Learn how to use the G2G system and follow the G2G feeds.


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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Doug.

Doug McCallum became a WikiTreer in May of 2012.  He’s involved in several projects, particularly as Project Coordinator for the Canada Project‘s Managed Profiles Team and the Categorization Project‘s Category Doctors.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

My primary research names are McCallum, Robertson, Caplette, Perkins, Strang, Price, Harding and LaFlash.

What are some of the locations you are researching?

This is an easy one. New England, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Quebec with a bit going into New York. I’ve spent most of my research time researching the Maritime Provinces.

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

I had taken a trip to Scotland about 1985 and became interested in its history. With a surname of McCallum, there was a definite personal tie. After returning home, my Dad told me to talk to my aunt who had been researching the family for quite some time. She sent me everything she had found and taught me the basics of genealogical research. Having just finished working on completing a Master’s degree and abandoning a PhD, I was well acquainted with doing general research so genealogy wasn’t a stretch. Once I started, I was hooked.

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

My favorite ancestor is Charlotte Taylor. She was born about 1755, probably in London. The first we know of her is when she marries her second husband sometime between 1774 and 1782. What makes her interesting is that she arrived in New Brunswick without a husband but with child. Charlotte ultimately married two more times (a total of four) and outlived them all. She is the stuff of legends with lots of stories about her having been passed down through the years. Northern New Brunswick was not an easy place. One of my “cousins” has written an historical fiction novel about her where she said she picked the most romantic path through the legends. The legend that Sally Armstrong chose to use was that Charlotte ran away from home with her father’s black butler. It is believed that he died somewhere in the Caribbean. I like that legend since I descend from his child who was born shortly after her arrival in New Brunswick.

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

My favorite brick wall was sorting out who my Great Grandfather, Albert Henry Perkins was. For years I felt that he must have been thrown off the saucer on its way to Roswell. No one with his name had been born in Vermont where he claimed to be from. There were Perkins families but no Waldo/Walter Perkins married to a Lorraine. Those names appeared in his three marriage records. His death record was even less accurate than his marriage records. Long story short, he was using his mother’s maiden name and was remembering an uncle who lived in the same household after Lorraine left her husband. Albert never knew who his father was. This was solved by finding his brother and researching him to find clues to their father and then following his mother forward in time.

If you could pick one person in history to be related to, who would it be and why?

This is a tough one. Should it be da Vinci (combining love of science/engineering with art) or Charles Rennie Mackintosh (art and functional design) or Maria Sybylla Merien whose fascination with insect metamorphosis lead her to study insects in Suriname on her own. Art and science are a theme.

What are some of your interests outside of genealogy?

Outside of genealogy, I’m quite passionate about botanical art. I have a certificate in Botanical Illustration from the School of Botanical Art and Illustration at the Denver Botanic Gardens. I also like gardening and we have a large garden. With the garden, beans are a passion and we raise more than a dozen varieties. Finally, travel. We take several trips each year and most of them are genealogy related. Sometimes to research in places our ancestors lived and other times to take advanced courses in genealogy research.

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing? If you’re  involved in a project(s), tell us about how you participate in it.

I originally joined WikiTree in 2012 but never did anything until I rediscovered it last December. Since then I’ve become more involved. I’m involved in several projects with more or less activity in each. I’m active in the Canadian project with a lot of work going on with Prince Edward Island Locations and helping do the same for New Brunswick. I’ve also just become Project Coordinator for their Managed Profiles team. In the Military and War Project, I’m working on a personal project to document the World War I soldiers of New Brunswick. Finally, I’ve become quite active in the Categorization Project where I’m becoming a Coordinator for the Category Doctors.

What brought you to WikiTree? (In other words, how did you find us?)

I had been searching for a better way to make my genealogy public. The large number of fictional trees on Ancestry that had no sources and lots of bad research made me want a single world tree. FamilySearch was a bit better but wasn’t what I wanted. WikiTree comes the closest. I can’t say how I found it but was just looking for what options existed.

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

What I like the most is the intent to have a single, well documented tree.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

If I could improve one thing, it would be usability. I would work toward W3C WCAG 2.1 compliance. WikiTree is quite difficult to use for those with vision problems.

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

  • Take your time and get to understand WikiTree before uploading your large GEDCOM file. It will save you time and headaches in the future.
  • Spend some time learning about sources and how to properly cite them. Good source citations not only help those who come along later, they will also help you.
  • Use WikiTree as your opportunity to become a genealogist and not just do genealogy.


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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Skye.

Skye is on the right

Skye Driggs has been a WikiTreer since July of 2016.  She mostly spends her time improving profiles and connecting them to our single family tree. Her current project is transcribing records from the village where her Polish/Ukranian ancestors lived and creating profiles for those folks.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?  

My current obsession is my father’s paternal side of the family:  Korchowec, Mań, Nagórny, Nakoneczny, Piechowska, Sączała/Sonczalla, Wołczasty.

What are some of the locations you are researching?  

Specifically:  Cieplice, Gmina Przeworsk, Subcarpathian Vivodeship, Poland (pre 1918: Cieplice, Gmina Jaroslaw, Galicia, Austria). At present, I am researching where my “Polish” ancestors originated, to discover they most likely were Ruthenian (Ukrainian) ethnicity.  

I was lucky to find online archived records from this village and have been working on transcribing marriage records, as the records are not indexed. At present I have added over 1600 (sourced) profiles to WikiTree, and my goal is to connect as many of these people as I can to the World Tree.

This is honestly the first time I broke out of my comfort zone as I have never attempted to research my ancestors in their native homelands.  To my luck the church records were written in Latin. In piecing together this great big puzzle, I have found more generations of ancestors.

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?  

My interest in family history started when I was a little girl.  I was always asking my parents about where our family came from, and repeatedly looked through photo albums.  My parents shared as much as they knew, but it wasn’t enough obviously. For about 20 years (with some time-outs), I have been actively researching.  Some of us are called upon to be the “story-tellers of the tribe”, and I am honored to have that title.

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?  

I don’t have a favorite, they all are special in some way.  At this moment I feel my great-grandmother Anna Mań is by my side, guiding me through my current “project.”  My great-aunt wrote a biography about her mother many years ago, which I have transcribed to her profile. I’ve had many messages from random members, just letting me know that they enjoyed reading it.  Anna seemed to be loved by many and very charming. From the biography: “Because of her broken English and the language barrier, she would call Mickey Rooney “Macaroni,” Dinah Shore “Dinosaur” and she would often say “Makes no marre difference” (rolling her r’s) which translated to combining the two phrases “it makes no difference” and “it doesn’t matter.”  

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

Aside from what the transcription project has revealed, the majority of my brick walls have been broken down by DNA/genetic application to genealogy.  I’ve helped several adoptees (or a relative who didn’t know one parent), find what they are looking for. In that process I have learned a systematic way to organize this information and make my time more productive.  Beforehand it was overwhelming to look at my DNA, now I feel like I know what I’m doing.

What are some of your interests outside of genealogy?

Mom of two Boy Scouts (one Eagle.)  I was a volunteer CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) for 8 years.  I’ve dabbled in various mediums of art all my life. My current focus is on Mixed Martial Arts/Kajukenbo.  MMA forces me to step outside my comfort zone, and it’s a very humbling experience.

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing?  

Over two years.  I spend most of my time building trees and profiles for friends and family.

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

That it’s a collaborative tree!  I love that I can sign up family/cousins who are interested, add them where they need to be added and they can help contribute.  I love how having more eyes on our ancestors preserves our family story. I am always eager to help others in need.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?  

The way a woman’s name appears, especially if she has been married multiple times.  For example: Instead of it saying: Pearl Martha Perkins formerly Bain aka Marvin … I would like it to read something more clear like: Pearl Martha Bain (1) Marvin (2) Perkins.

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

My family tree is more extensive than it has ever been since finding WikiTree, especially once I was able to connect my more distant ancestors to information already there.  Voila! I also have helped to source and add information to those more distant lines as well.

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

Please, no more gedcoms.  I’ve run into too many “dump and run” profiles that needed TLC, b/c probably the profile manager was overwhelmed, and soooo many errors/duplicates.  Take your time, enter in your profiles manually. Learn how to format, there is so much information out there (I have a link on my profile.) Just do the best you can do, remember you can always edit later and there is plenty of help if you need it.


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