Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Mindy.

Mindy Silva joined us on WikiTree in July of 2017 and is one of our newest Leaders!  She is active as a Mentor, Greeter and Data Doctor and is currently working on launching the new Portugal Project.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

I’ve done a lot of work on my mother’s side of the family. Now I’m focusing on my father’s side. After spending all that time researching New England families, it has been an eye opener. My father is from Hawaii, his ancestors from Portugal. I’ve found the parish records simply fascinating! Each record is handwritten in a parish book. The earlier records (dating back to the early 16th century) are short and heavily abbreviated.

As you move to more current times they started including more and more information in them. Some you can find both sets of grandparents in, where each was born and their occupations. I’ve looked at thousands upon thousands of them now. My experience in the early New England wills has helped me with the older script. My skills at translating them have developed through the course of researching.

What are some of the locations you are researching?

Most of my Portugal ancestors came from the Madeira Islands. Some of them came from the Azores. The research approach is different there. I’ve found that keeping a map of the counties handy is a big help. If you can’t find a marriage in Magdalena do Mar, you look to see what other parishes are around there. Unlike some of the small villages I researched in England, where each of the sons went outside of the village to seek a wife; in Madeira a lot of them married in the parish they lived in. Or, at the very least, the same county.

The priests kept extensive records for this purpose. If two people were closer than fourth cousins, they were not allowed to get married without special dispensation from the church. It was not only against the churches’ rules, it was against civil law. For those couples that received such a dispensation it was recorded in the parish books. It really helps with the research to know if they are related somehow.

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

My initial interest was as a freshman in high school. I had an assignment (term paper level) to complete a family history. Back then you looked at microfilm and didn’t have the internet for other locations. My maternal grandfather had moved the family from Minnesota to California, due to health reasons. By the time I was a freshman I was living in Oregon. I could not access any ‘local’ records for my family members. That is when I found out that my family did not like to talk about the family and who their ancestors were. Some, I found, simply didn’t know. My mother had always said that that I was French, German, English, Irish and Native American. No mention was made about my father’s side. I had accepted this, but really wanted to know which ancestors had contributed what.

I developed a long-term pen pal relationship with a great-aunt that I am grateful for. Now I only wish I had been given a list of questions to ask her, as she is long gone. I now make ‘books’ up for my mother from time to time, to introduce her to the people that I have found in our tree. She is disabled and not very mobile and is delighted each time she gets one. My mother-in-law has the same passion for genealogy, so we spend a lot of time together looking through dusty courthouse books and talking through our brick walls.

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

It’s so hard to pick just one! One of my original favorites was Isabella (Bland) (Austin) Leavitt, a ninth great-grandmother. She was born in England and migrated to Rockingham, New Hampshire. I loved reading about the history at the time. Later I found a photograph on one of those ‘lost photos’ sites. The photographer had made a comment that it was odd she had left the names ‘Bland Leavitt’ when she was clearly not married. She had never gone back to pick up the photographs, and he couldn’t locate anyone with that name combination. It was a descendant of hers and I love to picture her all dressed up, thinking whimsically of her great-grandmother and giving that name.

I wish I had been on WikiTree at that time to document my research progress with her. I suppose she needs to go on my ‘To Do’ list to spruce up! Now I would have to add one from my dad’s side: Alexandrina Amélia da Conceição da Silva Gonçalves Pereira. She was a brick wall that I just kept going back to. She and her husband migrated to Hawaii with several small children when she was twenty-six. They had at least ten children, and I have now proven her name and parentage. I think she was a brave soul for making that journey, and I’m glad that I can honor her by presenting her history on WikiTree.

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

Rachel Hodges, a fourth great-grandmother. I just couldn’t get past her on that line and decided to go back and look at the records I had. I posted a question in G2G for help on deciphering the witness at her wedding, hoping it would be a relative. Several people jumped in immediately and helped me get past that block – a special thanks to Frank Gill and Lynda Crackett with that one! I spent hours pouring over records and learning about Seavington, England. It was a wonderful discovery!

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing?

I’ve been on WikiTree since the 26th of July 2017 (hey, I’m almost to my anniversary!). I usually split my time up between cousin collaboration, projects such as PGM and Data Doctors, Mentor  and Greeting help, and browsing through the G2G. Lately, though, a lot of my time was spent working with Susie MacLeod on the new Portugal Project. Susie has been wonderful to work with, and I’ve learned a lot about starting up new projects on WikiTree. There are so many wonderful people on WikiTree that are willing to help or offer advice! The project will be fully launched soon, and we have members poised and ready to take off with the profiles and improve them. Then I can just add it to my list of things I work on and return some of my focus to my other projects.

I’m proud and honored to say that I have been recently promoted to Leader. My hope is to continue helping others on WikiTree so that they can find their own way, and their own treasures, through the exciting journey of genealogy.

What brought you to WikiTree? (In other words, how did you find us?)

I had gotten my dna done through Ancestry.com and posted it on gedmatch.com. In my search to find cousins, it was frustrating to see how many sites didn’t work with the other ones. I could see who I was related to on Ancestry, but not see the dna connection. I could see the dna connection on gedmatch, but not how we matched. After finding some cousins that I now work with weekly, and sometimes daily, it was frustrating that we couldn’t work on the same profiles. I love to help others, and I wanted to just ‘jump in’ on their tree and find records. I searched around the web and found WikiTree, the answer to my prayers! Now several of the cousins have joined WikiTree as well, and we can collaborate. We work together to find records and can leave research notes for the other to pick up on when we stop. I love it!

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

That is another question that is hard to pick just one answer for. I love the collaboration, the forum when you need an extra set of eyes to look at a problem, and the ‘white space’ on a profile. I can put translations for baptisms, write research notes with handy links, search right from WikiTree for further records, and see each source that someone has found for that person. In the US I love the space to put a Residence and a Family section. This allows me to easily see if the migration pattern matches the children’s birth locations. It also makes it easier for me to then grab information and inline citations for creating the ‘story’ portion of the biography.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

It should come with a warning sticker: Warning, this site can cause extreme genealogy addiction, add to communication, fill up your email box, encourage you to help perfect strangers, teach you about projects you never knew you were interested in, and can lure you deep into family rabbit holes. Just kidding, but it has become one of my favorite passions! As my email signature says “So much to Wiki, so little time…”

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

I think I’ve covered most of the answer to this question. In the past I have always enjoyed helping others. I take photographs for FindAGrave, index records for FamilySearch, help DAR members and prospective member find records, and now collaborate with others on family members – mine or theirs. WikiTree has been a wonderful experience, and it has added to my perspective on research immensely!

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

Read through the G2G often! I found out so much this way when I first started. I pasted the links to answers, or pages like Stickers, in my Scratchpad on my Nav Home Page and it helped me learn my way around WikiTree. Now I feel like an ‘old pro.’


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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Saundra.

Saundra became a WikiTreer in August of 2017.  She spends a great deal of time adding to and improving our Ohio profiles.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

Right now I’m working on my Murchland and Van Sickle ancestors.  I have the wills for the Murchlands but don’t yet know how they are all connected.  With the Van Sickles, they moved around a lot and changed the spelling of their names so much that I’m having to deeply research the locations to find connections.

What are some of the locations you are researching?

I’m working the entire state of Ohio and profiling the early settlers of each town, township, and county.  Right now I’m in Jackson county which led me to create a special category for Welsh Settlements in Ohio.  That is a perfect companion to the African American Settlements in Ohio which I started to record the freed slaves who relocated in the state.  It all will come together when I get farther along with my work in Ohio.

I’m also presently working the pioneers of “Ten Mile Country”.  This will hopefully fill in some of the blanks with my own ancestors.

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

My Aunt Jan did all the preliminary work for my direct ancestry.  She took our line back to James and Mary (Lafferty) Stuart of Cow Pasture, Virginia the hard way.  Door to door, cemetery to cemetery, and handwritten letters to county court houses. . . it took her years to accomplish what I can accomplish in a handful of hours today.  Today, many people are using her work without knowing how hard it was or how long it took for her to accumulate.

Aunt Jan saw my interest in our history on a trip to Point Pleasant when I was about 12 and she planted a seed in  me hoping I would  take up where she left off.   Apparently,  I wasn’t the only family member she touched, either.  Since I’ve now the time to work the ancestry I’ve found many cousins who’ve built on to her original work.

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

That would be my Dad.  He’s West Virginia hill people through and through and it makes me proud to be descended from Appalachian Scots-Irish settlers.  But, other than Dad, I don’t have a favorite ancestor.  Some people have more interesting lives than others and it’s just fun to learn more about them.  I’m always amazed when a woman has more than 6 children.  I love the families who left their established towns and moved to newly opened territory. . . the courage it took is a testament to the human race.

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

Working the African American Settlements in Ohio is tough.  The records are scanty. . . the names aren’t complete. . . and there’s little chance of tracing them back to their origins.  Alex Haley was very lucky.  With so-called “brick walls” of Caucasians, I figure time and collaboration will eventually open doors and family Bibles so I just tell myself that the universe will help fill in the blanks and keep on truckin’.

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing?

I’ve been on WikiTree a little over a year and I’ve learned that I have Genealogical ADD.  I’ll work a specific name or location for a time then, when everything starts mushing together in my brain, I move to another name or location.  I keep my overall focus on mine and my husband’s family and the state of Ohio so I don’t stray too far and can easily come back and continue previous work.  Since I have the entire northern half of Ohio still to work, I figure I’ll be fine for at least another year.

What brought you to WikiTree?

That was my Dad.  I was floundering looking for a decent free site to work and Dad said he liked WikiTree.  I signed up almost immediately and began working.

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

I love the freedom.  I can add backgrounds, photos, sources, and even music and videos if they add to the profile of the person.  My husband and late father-in-law are musicians and I was free to add their music through YouTube videos.  Bob Evans, the late pork and restaurant mogul of Ohio, has a video series so I added that.  I can connect unrelated persons who traveled together to settle a specific area.  We can really flesh out history on WikiTree.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

Right now, there’s so many profiles on WikiTree that I’d change the name search protocol.  When searching to see if an early settler is already on WikiTree–“John Russ” for example– then John Ross, John Rust, John Russo, etc. shows up and barely 100 years are covered on the search page.  I have to go to the bottom and ask specifically for “John Russ”.  It would save time and confusion if I had to specifically ask for similar surnames rather than having to specifically ask for exact surnames.

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

I hope I’ve helped genealogy by being specific.   Aunt Jan taught me that it’s “Location, Location, Location”.  There are thousands of John Smiths in New Jersey and if you don’t know their exact location you can’t know if it’s your ancestor John Smith.  So, I work hard to make sure that I narrow my locations to the smallest common denominator possible to help those who see the profiles know if it’s their ancestor.  If I can find the information, I will give a street address of the deceased person.  (I prefer not to work on those born after 1910 if I can help it.  I don’t want to mess with privacy issues.)

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

Just go for it!  Create, Learn, Have Fun!  In the short time I’ve been here I’ve learned so much from other profiles and, more importantly, from the other genealogists here.  It’s OK to make mistakes because everyone knows what it’s like to be new at this.  Like it says on the page. . . Be Bold!


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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Bonnie.

Bonnie Saunders became a WikiTreer in February of 2015.  She likes to participate in our weekly challenges and is very active in our Spain Project.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

I am researching six family lines: Saunders/Sanders, Alford/Alvord, MacLeod, Ball, Simmons/Simon, Kousch/Kausch.  I’ve been able to trace their movements once they came to the New World in the 17th-19th centuries but have not found many documents from their areas of origin, namely England, France, Germany, Netherlands & Scotland.

What are some of the locations you are researching?

Apart from the places mentioned above, I have looked into New England and Michigan settlements since a lot of my family’s history occurred in or near those areas.   I have spent time also researching Spain. My husband and daughter were both born in Spain and I’ve lived in the country for almost 47 years, which has led me recently to join the Spain Project led by Susie MacLeod and Wendy Sullivan.  I heartily recommend it to anyone who has family roots in Spain and/or who is interested in the country!

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

My interest began one morning when I was looking for my Aunt’s obituary.  I hadn’t been in touch with my mother’s family for years and while I figured my Aunt must have passed away, as indeed she had, I decided to look around the web.  I quickly found the information, and one thing leading to another, I started looking up other family members. Soon I connected to popular genealogy haunts – mainly Familysearch.org. Ancestry.com and WikiTree.com – and before I knew it, I was knee-deep in censuses, Find-a-Grave searches and quaint town histories. With the internet, I had scores of puzzle pieces easily within reach, what was lacking, unfortunately, was background information about who my family is.  I see now, how very little I know about my ancestors, and am truly sorry I never took the time to quiz my parents and grandmothers about those who preceded me. It took a fluke search to bring some of that family history to the surface but I’m having fun piecing it together!

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

I have a lot of favorites, although I must admit that I’ve found myself quite enjoying the Alford family.  It would appear that the Alfords arrived on New World shores early from England, one Benedict Alvordborn around 1619 in Whitestaunton, Somersetshire, England, died in 1683 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.  How he got there or the exact date of his arrival remain mysteries, but from there on out, the English colonies in America were blessed with colorful Alford/Alvord family members.  They were a flamboyant family, educated people who had a penchant for religion (several were Reverends). All in all, I’ve found them to be an unconventional and refreshing collective!

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

There are a couple of brick walls, more like barricades, that I haven’t been able to breech, but the one that bothers me the most is the parentage of Green Saunders, (1767-1845), who was my fourth great grandfather.  I’ve combed the internet, read histories about the towns he was in – St Lawrence, Nicholville, and Dickenson, New York – and even have a Family Bible where he appears with his wife Sarah Chamberlain …. but the documents that link him definitively to his parents have eluded me up to now.  

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing?

I joined WikiTree in February of 2015 and started building profiles the following September. Since then I’ve been working on and off in WikiTree, primarily on my own family.  In 2017, I participated in the October Source-a-Thon, and this year in the April Spring Clean-a-Thon. I have also worked on some 10 or so Weekly Challenges in 2018. As mentioned earlier, I just joined the Spain Project, and am a member of the Profilers Team in that group.

What brought you to WikiTree? (In other words, how did you find us?)

It was a happy coincidence, I was looking for information on the web and WikiTree popped up in my queries.  

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?  

The database is very well designed.  A lot of thought and effort have gone into streamlining it and improvements are being made continuously.  It’s all rather amazing! One thing that never ceases to mystify me is how well it handles merges. The relationship finder is a delightful tool, as well.  The philosophy behind WikiTree is innovative: in most genealogy sites you are obliged to wade through countless trees, because your one ancestor appears in a myriad of different user posts, but in WikiTree, there is just one entry, or at least there should be! (which is why there are merges.).  The WikiTree Community is a boon in itself, people are gracious and helpful and are extremely generous with their time and expertise. Last, WikiTree will be here when we are all long gone, I appreciate that continuity.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

I wouldn’t mind having fields for the Cemetery Name and Cemetery place, and maybe even a third for the Memorial # (if it’s a Find a Grave entry), and since there’s no harm in wishing, ditto for Baptismal info, Church name and place.

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

I have had several people contact me via WikiTree about specific ancestors, asking for information or scans, and they in turn have provided me with all kinds of useful data, anecdotes and pictures that have enriched the profiles I’ve posted.  One such story happened in January 2018, when a person who was renovating an old house in Ypsilanti, Michigangot in touch with me.  He was researching the previous owners, had come across some of the profiles I manage and e-mailed me, requesting information about the family and any old pictures I had of them or the house.

My father’s family had built the house themselves (they were carpenters), in the 1860’s, and only they had lived there until my grandmother died in 1974.  It’s a home we all loved and enjoyed, and had fond memories of, but it was my understanding that it had been torn down after her death. Much to my glee, not only is it still standing, it’s being lovingly restored. We were able to exchange ample information, I provided the “before” pictures and the new owners the “after” images, and all of this was possible thanks to WikiTree.

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

Previously, I expressed my regrets that I hadn’t asked my family enough about where we came from.  If you are lucky enough to have family still living, don’t make the same mistake, and talk to them now before chapters are irreversibly closed.  


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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Steven.

Steven Tibbetts joined WikiTree in May of 2013.  He participates on our site in many ways but most actively as a Data Doctor and in our weekly Data Doctors Challenges.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

Tibbetts is of course the biggest one I am working on and trying to separate those from Joseph Tabbut and Henry Tibbetts. I’m also expanding into other names from maternal lines like Thompson, Hartley, Smith, Foss, and Benson.

What are some of the locations you are researching?

Most of the locations I deal with on a personal level are in Maine, particularly DownEast. Almost all seem to be in the New England area.

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

In all honesty, my family background has been terrible. Note, I don’t add personal things to my ancestors’ biographies. I just wondered can my family be that bad? So I decided to search my ancestors. I was also told all the people with the last name “Tibbetts” that live in my area were descendants of Henry Tibbetts and no relation to me. I am now finding that is not true.

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

I am very interested in Joseph Tabbut and wish I could learn more about the hardships he endured migrating to the United States. He lost several children including at least 3 to drowning. It is like a great historical mystery and I’m tracking down leads.

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

My Great Grandmother Eleanor Signey Benson was a tough one to get information on but due to help from G2G members I finally made headway and this opened up a whole strange story about my family as well as putting me into contact with a couple of relatives. My current brick wall is Joseph Tabbut and trying to get accurate information from before he migrated to the US. I have a couple leads but none I can be really sure of at this time.

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing?

I first joined WikiTree around May 4, 2013. From then until about August 2017 I really wasn’t able to do much. There wasn’t as much support as there is now and I more or less gave up looking for any. Then even though I didn’t consider myself a genealogist, I decided to give G2G a try. Imagine my surprise to find out it was the WikiTree Forum!!!!! Now I spend most of my time helping on G2G, being active with the Data Doctors, and maintaining the WikiTree spreadsheet for the Data Doctor challenges.  Thankfully the US History and Canadian History spreadsheet are finished because they gave me quite a few headaches.

What brought you to WikiTree? (In other words, how did you find us?)

My girlfriend won some type of prize and she got to pick between several choices. The one she chose was a free week of Ancestry.com. Imagine my surprise to find my father died almost 3 years previously. Once I grabbed all the info I could, I looked around for another site to keep track of it all. I tried 3 but in spite of my earlier problems I found WikiTree to be better and have more potential.

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

I would have to say the best part is G2G because I enjoy helping people. And it often amazes me what other people stumble across.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

Some type of site directory. I’m constantly stumbling over things I didn’t even know were there and then spending hours trying to find it again. I even made an INFO tab on the spreadsheet just to track the things I find.

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

When I first joined WikiTree the only family I knew went as far as my grandparents. Being in foster care, I didn’t get any stories handed down of family happenings. Now I’m finding relatives from the Mayflower and even earlier.   

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

G2G is a Forum, not just a newsletter for professional genealogists. When in doubt, look for answers there. If you can’t find them, ask. And don’t forget those critical tags so people see it. Also, while we try to avoid making errors, don’t be so worried that you don’t do anything. Errors happen. They can be fixed. Think of it as a fun learning experience.


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Hi WikiTreers,

Welcome to a new installment of “Meet our Members.” It’s time to get to know another awesome member of our community: Meet Amy.

Amy Utting became a WikiTreer in May of 2016.  She works diligently to add sources to profiles she manages, and participates in several projects including Irish Roots and the New Zealand Project. Amy recently became one of our newest Mentors.

What are some of the surnames you are researching?

Until I have access to the family records I need, I’m avoiding the /UTTING/ side of my family for now, as the furthest ancestor I’ve reached is just a complete source of confusion. I’m currently focusing my attention mostly on the /JERMYN/ family from Suffolk.

(Editor’s Note: Amy has a  list of many of the surnames she is researching on her profile as well as links to her extensive lists of  her notable relations and WikiTree cousins!) 

What are some of the locations you are researching?

I have family on both sides of the Irish Sea, so I’m looking equally into both sides. Cork and Dublin are the predominant areas of Ireland I’m researching, while Suffolk and Norfolk both crop up quite a bit in my research also. 

When and how did you get interested in genealogy and family history?

Because of my love of history, I was already intrigued by family stories for many years before I actually began actively researching my family tree. My grandfather passed away in 2014, and because my grandmother had been moved to a different care facility to the one he was in, a lot of her belongings had been left with him, so when he passed the family came together to sort through his things and figure out where it was all going to go. I was the one who got to keep a lot of the books, including a copy of the Kilgour Family Book (published by my second cousin, and fellow WikiTree member Kathryn Mooney). I vaguely remember reading through it, cover to cover, in a single afternoon and I was still highly intrigued after I finished. It all set off from there!

Who’s your favorite ancestor and why?

This will sound ridiculously sappy, but my great-grandfather, Leonard Utting, was probably my favourite. Charlie (a nickname from his middle name, Charles) was born in Norfolk and served in the British Army during World War I before he emigrated to Wellington, New Zealand, and married his first wife. While he served in the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces during World War II, his wife began an affair with the local storeman, which Charlie discovered upon his return. It was after this event (and subsequent divorce) that Charlie met my great-grandmother, Winifred Taylor, and they lived happily in the years following. I think it’s a lovely story, where my grandfather overcame relationship obstacles and two literal wars and still lived to just over eighty.

Tell us about a brick wall you were able to break down or one you hope to bust through.

It would be nice to go further back in the /UTTING/ side of the family, especially as it’s my actual surname. At some point soon I’ll be travelling further north from where I live to meet with my great-aunt and hopefully gain access to all of the research that she’s done, so I have hopes that I’ll be able to break through this particular brick wall soon!

How long have you been on WikiTree and what do you spend the most time doing?

I first joined WikiTree in May 2016, though I only dabbled for the first few months until I really figured out what I was doing. I currently spend most of my time hunting down further sources for the information I have on WikiTree.

What brought you to WikiTree? (In other words, how did you find us?)

I had made a Prezi powerpoint about one of my ancestors (William Kilgour) for a school project, and as Prezi is public, someone found it and commented that the author of my source (the Kilgour Family Book) was a member of a website called WikiTree, and that the website could possibly help me connect more of my family to me.  

What is your favorite thing about WikiTree, or which feature(s) do you like the most?

The relationship finder, definitely. I have a well-documented love for history, and it’s absolutely fascinating to see which notable people of history I’m related to.

If you could improve one thing about WikiTree, what would it be?

I can’t think of anything I’d want to improve! I think it comes down to the fact that, when something runs well, you generally don’t think of things to improve until they either break, or someone improves them first.

What is an example of how WikiTree has helped you with your genealogy or how you’ve helped genealogy with WikiTree?

I’m always thrilled when people point out duplicates of family members or of other profiles I manage, because it’s a lovely feeling when you collaborate with others around you and you’re able to make sure that your information is as correct as it possibly can be.

Any tips for someone just starting out on WikiTree?

Try not to grow too confused! It’s honestly pretty easy to get lost when you first start out, especially when it comes to sources, so it’s important to take your time and verify your information, and sort of map it all out in your head before confusing yourself.


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