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William Bates

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William Bates
Born in Hanover Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USAmap
Brother of
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married in Gloucester, New Jersey, USAmap
Died in Pequannock Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USAmap
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Contents

Biography

The first of William Bates and Mary Ball’s children was Ephraim1, born May 24th 17432, in Hanover NJ, and baptized at the First Presbyterian Church of Morristown, July 6, 17453. Though other members of the First Presbyterian Church of Hanover had their children baptized in Morristown that year, it may have had special significance to the parents of Ephraim Bates, as Rev. Timothy Johnes was a descendent of Wales4, and they too were descendents of Wales. For William Bates was the son of Thomas Bates, a native of Wales567 and early settler of Hanover NJ, arriving with the other permanent settlers of Whippany Village about 1710, and marrying in 1713 Parnel Gordon of Hanover8. And Mary Ball was the daughter of Caleb Ball II, who also moved to Hanover about 1710 from Newark NJ9. Caleb was the grandson of Edward Ball who emigrated from Wales to Branford CT in 166410, and then followed the Rev. Abraham Pierson and his congregation from Branford to Newark.11 Thomas and Parnel lived about 10 minutes walk from the First Presbyterian Church of Hanover, established in 1718 in the village of Whippany12. They lived along the road running north out of the village, toward Troy Hills, at the top of the little hill above the Whippany River13. There they raised six children, Rachel, John, William, Daniel, Thomas, and David14. Their home and farm were probably modest, about 100 acres of land, some horses, and a few cattle. David, the youngest son and heir to the homestead, is listed as owning 93 acres of improved land, another 11 acres of unimproved land, four horses, six cattle, and a 24 by 24 foot one story home, with two windows and a door15. Exactly when Thomas came from Wales is hard to determine, but many of the early Welsh immigrants to America left Wales during the time of the Stuarts, from 1662 to 1688, due to persecution of religious noncomformity16.17 That Thomas chose to live in Hanover NJ, a stronghold of New England Puritanism18, is a good indication that his family was nonconformist, and may have left during this time. The period between 1645 and 1710 was difficult in Wales, due to the poor climate and the Civil Wars, leading to a decline in population19. So Thomas and his family probably emigrated both for the freedom to worship, and for the opportunity for economic improvement. The fertile lands of the Passaic River and the highlands beyond were first sighted by a member of the Newark Church20, and the members soon bought title for this land from the friendly Indians of New Jersey. Settlement of the area began as early as 1685, but permanent settlement seems to have not been established until 1710, when Thomas Bates arrived with others from Newark, Elizabethtown, and Long Island21. The high land of Whippany and Hanover was well drained by streams, and there was little undergrowth below the virgin timber. The soil was fertile and the cleared timbers were used for building homes and smelting iron ore, which was said to be so plentiful that at first it could be picked from the ground with little effort. In 1718, John Richards the schoolmaster of Hanover Township donated 3 and a half acres “for a meeting-house, school-house, burying yard and training-field”, along the Whippany River, about 100 yards down stream from the first iron forge known as The Old Ironworks22. The first church was rather primitive in nature “a little shingled house, without cupola or spire, with outside stairs leading to the gallery,” but it served the parishioners until 1755, when a new church was built several miles to the east, in East Hanover. The first pastor of the church was Reverend Nathaniel Hubbell, a graduate of Yale College, who led the Whippany Church and Westfield Church from 1718 to 1730. He was followed by the Reverend John Nutman, also a graduate of Yale, who departed the Presbyterian Church of Hanover in 1745. The eminent Reverend Jacob Green then took up the pastorate from 1746 to 179023. He was a graduate of Harvard College and became a great religious and political leader in New Jersey, writing in 1775 a pamphlet calling for American independence, and in 1778 a sermon that was widely read, calling for the ending of slavery in America. He was a stern and pious man, influenced by the revivalist preaching of Whitfield and Tennent. On his way to Georgia to work in an orphanage of Rev Whitfield’s when the financing fell through; Rev Aaron Burr of Newark convinced him to become the pastor of the Hanover Church. Though he admonished the church members for engaging in frivolous amusements, under his pastoral counseling and care, the congregation experienced a “special outpouring of the holy spirit…like rain on mow grass; as showers that water the earth.” It was under the tutelage of Reverend Jacob Green that Ephraim Bates would have attended services with the other numerous Bates relations at the First Church of Hanover. His brothers David, Uzal and Caleb, and sisters Rhoda and Mary, were all baptized by Rev. Green at the Hanover Church24. His Aunt Rachel with her husband Attorney Joseph Kitchel, a deacon of the church, would have attended services with their eleven children25. They lived in East Hanover on close to a 1000 acres of land26. It was partly their influence that led to the new church being built in East Hanover in 1755. Their fourth child, Aaron, born about the same year as Ephraim, became a member of the State Legislature, was elected to the House of Representatives, and became a United States Senator. Ephraim’s Uncle Daniel and Uncle Thomas, were also married at the church. Daniel married Elizabeth Griffing27, who was also of Welsh heritage, and had four children, Martin, Abigail, Parnel, and Lydia, all baptized by Rev. Green. And Thomas had six children, Sarah, Mary, Hannah, Rachel, Eunice, and Daniel, who also attended services at the new church in East Hanover28. Sunday church was an all day affair, with a service a fore noon and another after noon, with a social and a discussion of the sermon in between29. In addition to moral instruction under the Rev Green, Ephraim would have attended school to obtain the basics in reading and writing. His youngest uncle, David, may have been more studious then his father William, but as Presbyterians, they all valued learning, as knowledge was necessary to reveal god’s truth. His cousin, David Stanhope, was a scholar, studying Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Mathematics, under the distinguished Rev Witherspoon, the President of Princeton College. David became a judge in Oneida NY, and then became an assistant engineer of the Erie Canal, and chief engineer of the Ohio Canal.30 About 1758 William moved the family from Hanover Township to Pequannock Township, beginning Ephraim’s life as a pioneer settler. Ephraim, who was 15, would have helped his father clear the new land, gaining the experience he would need for his many land developments in Ohio. Though it is not known where William resided in Pequannock, it was probably near his good friend John Huntington in Shongum, a few miles south of Rockaway31. William’s son Uzal probably inherited his estate, and is noted in a census of 1782 to own 150 acres of land, three horses and three cattle32. It may be that Ephraim’s grandfather Thomas passed away in 1758, and that William used his inheritance to purchase land in Pequannock. He may have timed his move to make room for his younger brother David on the homestead in Hanover. David married Phebe Tappan in 175933, and would become a prominent citizen of Hanover, being elected a major and captain of the militia during the Revolutionary War34, and a church elder35. William and Mary Bates had another daughter in 1759, Martha, who was baptized at the Morristown Church by Rev. Johnes36; the Rockaway Church having not yet been completed. William’s name appears on an undated petition for a pastor at the Rockaway Church37, but it was not until April 1768, that Rev. James Tuttle Jr. was installed as the minister at the Church38. Soon after the birth of Martha, Ephraim’s mother Mary passed away39. Perhaps the hard work of the preceding year readying the new farm and delivering her seventh child were too much for her. As his younger children still needed a mother, William remarried soon to a woman named Rebecca, who may herself have been a widow, with a child named Catherine. Yet William would not outlive his first wife Mary by many years; his will is dated December 8, 1767, in Pequannock Township, and states: “Wife, Rebecca, a third of my estate, and the rest to my two daughters, Catherine and Rhoda. Executors- my wife, and my friend John Huntington, cooper.” Witnesses – Ephraim Goble and Stephen Beach. The will was proved September 3, 1770, but his second wife Rebecca renounced the will on February 17, 1770, in favor of his friend John Huntington, perhaps an indication that Rebecca had remarried.40 Though little is known about William, there is much in the History of Morris County New Jersey concerning his friend John Huntington. He was one of the founders of the Rockaway Presbyterian Church in 1758 and one of the church elders41. During the Revolutionary War he was elected as a captain-lieutenant of the militia under Colonel William Winds. It is noted that “his beautiful handwriting and fair composition in the church records show him to have been a man of considerable education.” He lived near Shongum and was engaged as a workman in connection with the forges of Jacob Ford. At his death he left a considerable estate, and “a good name and example”. By the time William died in 1767, Ephraim was 24, his brother David 20, Uzal was 18, Caleb 16, Rhoda 14, Mary 10, and Martha 8. We know that both Ephraim and his brother David owned land in 1768, as both paid church tax in that year.42 Ephraim seems to have purchased land just north of Rockaway Village, between Cranbury Pond and the Rockaway River, as he mortgaged land to Thomas Milledge and Abraham Odgen near there: 17.03 acres on March 17, 1771, and 35 acres on February 5, 1772.43 Ephraim married Susannah Clark44in 1768, and became a member of the Rockaway Presbyterian Church45. Susannah was probably the daughter of Henry Clark, descended from the Clark family that originated in Scotland and came to Long Island in 169546. Henry built a log cabin in Morristown in 1724, and married his first wife Anne in 1725. After his second marriage, he moved west to the Shongum area, near the Bates family and their friend John Huntington. His son John joined the Rockaway Presbyterian Church in 1770 and became an elder of the church in 1793. It is not known when Ephraim began preparing to move to the Ohio country, but it must have been soon after the death of his father. His brother Uzal, who married Elizabeth Hurin in 177547, would continue to run the family farm until all the sisters were married, and then he too would move to Ohio in 178848. Their sister Mary wedded David Cory of Hanover in 1777, before moving to Addington, Vermont49; and Martha married

David Reeve in Morristown 178050. There are no known records of Rhoda, Catherine or Caleb. In 1768 the signing of the peace treaty at Fort Stanwix with the Indians opened the area west of the Monagahela River and east of the Ohio River to legal settlement, and many Scotch-Irish families from Pennsylvania and Virginia began pouring into the country51. Ephraim mortgaged his lands near Cranbury Pond in 1771 and 1772, and set out for West Augusta County, in the Colony of Virginia52 in the spring of 1772, as his third child William was born53 on September 2, 1772 in Virginia54. It is said that in 1773 15 to 20 families departed from Morris County, led by two elders of the Mendham Presbtyerian Church, Demas Lindley and Jacob Cook55,56 headed for Ten Mile Creek in West Augusta County. Perhaps some of these families left earlier with the Bates family. Ephraim and Susannah had two children by then, Mary Polly (1769)57, and Isaac (1770)58. They probably traveled southwest to Fort Cumberland Maryland, and then northwest along Braddock’s Road. The following description of the journey along Braddock’s Road, is taken from the book “Old Redstone”.59 Though it occurred 12 years later than Ephraim’s journey, and the families traveled half the distance, it is probably representative of their experience. My father’s family was one of twenty that emigrated from Carlisle, and the neighboring country, to Western Pennsylvania, in the spring of 1784. Our arrangements for the journey would, with little variation, be descriptive of those of the whole caravan. Our family consisted of my father, mother, and three children, (the eldest five, the youngest less than one year old,) and a bound boy of fourteen. The road to be traveled in crossing the mountains was scarcely, if at all, practicable for wagons. Pack-horses were the only means of transportation then, and for years after. We were provided with three horses, on one of which my mother rode, carrying her infant, with all the table furniture and cooking utensils. On another were packed the stores of provisions, the plough-irons, and agricultural tools. The third horse rigged out with pack-saddle, and two large creels made of hickory withes, in the fashion of a crate, one over each side, in which were stowed the beds and bedding, and the wearing apparel of the family. In the centre of these creels there was an aperture prepared for myself and sister; and the top was well secured by lacing, to keep us in our places, so that only our heads appeared above. Each family was supplied with one or more cows, which was indispensable provision for the journey. Their milk furnished the morning and evening meal for the children, and the surplus was carried in canteens for us during the day. Thus equipped, the company set out on their journey. Many of the men being unacquainted with the management of horses, or the business of packing, little progress was made, the first day or two. When the caravan reached the mountains, the road was found to be hardly passable for loaded horses. In many places, the path lay along the edge of a precipice, where, if the horse had stumbled or lost his balance, he would have been precipitated several hundred feet below. The path was crossed by many streams, raised by the melting snow, and spring rains, and running with rapid current in deep ravines. Most of these had to be forded, as there were no bridges, and but few ferries. For many successive days,hair-breadth escapes were continually occurring; sometimes, horses falling; at other times, carried away by the current, and the women and children with difficulty saved from drowning. Sometimes, in ascending steep acclivities, the lashing of the creels would give way, and both children and creels tumble to the ground, and roll down the steep, until arrested by some traveler of the company. In crossing streams, or passing places of more than ordinary difficulty in the road, mothers were often separated from some of their children for many hours. The journey was made in April, when the nights were cold. The men who had been inured to the hardships of war, could with cheerfulness endure the fatigues of the journey. It was the mothers who suffered; they could not, after the toils of the day, enjoy the rest they so much needed at night; the wants of their suffering children must be attended to. After preparing their simple meal, they lay down, with scanty covering, in a miserable cabin, or, as it sometimes happened, in the open air, and often, unrefreshed, were obliged to rise early, to encounter the fatigues and dangers of another day. As the company approached the Monongahela, they began to separate. Some settled down near to friends and acquaintances who had preceded them. About half of the company crossed the Monongahela, and settled on Chartier’s creek, a few miles south of Pittsburgh, in a hilly country, well watered and well timbered. Settlers’ rights to land were obtained on easy terms. My father exchanged one of his horses for a tract, (bounded by certain brooks and marked trees,) which was found, on being surveyed, several years after, to contain 200 acres. The new-comers aided each other in building cabins, which were made of round logs, with a slight covering of clapboards. The building of chimneys and laying of floors were postponed to a future day. As soon as the families were all under shelter, the timber girdled, and the necessary clearing made for planting corn, potatoes, and a small patch of flax, some of the party were dispatched for seed. Corn was obtained in Pittsburgh; but potatoes could not be procured short of Ligonier valley, distant three days’ journey. The season was favorable for clearing; and by unremitting labor, often continued through a part of the night, the women laboring with their husbands in burning brush and logs, their planting was seasonably secured. But, while families and neighbors were cheering each other on with the prospect of an abundant crop, one of the settlements was attacked by Indians, and all of them were thrown into great alarm. This was a calamity which had not been anticipated. It had been confidently believed that peace with Great Britain would secure peace with her Indian allies. The very name of Indians chilled the blood of the late emigrants; but there was no retreat. If they desired to recross the mountains, they had not the provisions or means, and had nothing but poverty and suffering to expect, should they regain their former homes. They resolved to stay. Upon crossing the Monongahela River in 1772, Ephraim traveled up the Middle Fork of Ten Mile Creek and claimed land about three miles down stream from Jacob Cook’s homestead60, and about 6 miles downstream from Demas Lindley’s. Settling next to Ephraim were at least two Welshmen from New Jersey61, David Evans, and Moses Cooper. Others nearby are also likely to be Welsh, as Rees, Morris, and Hughes are common Welsh surnames62. Ephraim took land on both sides of Ten Mile Creek, but most of his 419 acres lay to the north of the creek, with a brook running down the middle of it; he named it “Pleasant Hill”. It is not known how large of a cabin he built upon it, or how much of the acreage he would clear, or even what he paid for it, though according to some reports the land for the first settlers was got from Virginia for next to nothing63. But by the time he sold his land in 1791 to Colonel Daniel McFarland64, it must have been a large home with much of the land being cleared, as Ephraim was the father to a large family. In addition to Mary Polly, and Isaac born in New Jersey, there was born at Cook’s Settlement, Virgina, William 1772, Phebe 177565, and Timothy 177866, and then after it became Amwell Township, Pennsylvania, there was born, Mary Anne 1780, Ephraim 1785, Daniel 1786, Ezekiel 1787, John67 and Amos 1794. Though Ephraim had expected peace with the Indians, he soon learned that the tribes of Ohio were unhappy with the treaty of Fort Stanwix, signed without their agreement by the Iroquois Indians of New York. The Shawnee were particularly unhappy with the loss of their hunting grounds in Kentucky, and the frontier was braced for another Indian War in 1774.68 Ephraim probably assisted in the building of two forts with his neighbors Nathaniel McGiffen, David Evans, James Milliken, and George Cooper, shortly after his arrival69. One known as Fort McFarland was on the land of Peter Garrett, and the other known as Fort Milliken was built upon a mound on the farm of Mrs. Samuel Bradon. These forts were constructed with block houses at the angles, and palisades running between the blockhouses. Homes were built facing inward from the walls as families had to be sheltered for long periods from the threat and rumor of Indian raids70. Two years after their arrival, Lord Dunmore’s War was ignited by white men, who murdered the family of Chief Logan at Captina Creek. Settlers who did not have forts then fled their homes, seeking shelter in forts on the east side of the Monongahela River71. Chief Logan’s raiding party is said to have traveled down Ten Mile Creek, burning homes and killing settlers, though none along the creek are reported to have been murdered72. So began the long border war, never fully settled until 1795, during which the settlers along Ten Mile Creek sought sanctuary in their forts during the summer and tended their fields under guard, whenever there was an alarm announced by the murder of another settler.73 By 1777 the Revolutionary War had reached the West, with the British encouraging the Indians to do battle with the American settlers74. In April of that year, probably after spring planting, Ephraim, with patriotic zeal, volunteered for Revolutionary service in Captain Enochs Virginia Militia75. He traveled west to meet Captain Enoch at the head of Wheeling Creek, and then with the rest of the company marched to the fort at Graves Creek along the Ohio River. He was stationed there for two months before marching north to reinforce Fort Henry along Wheeling Creek. Fort Henry was little more than a block house fort built to protect the 25 families then living in and around Wheeling76. Shaped like a parallelogram, the fort had block houses on the corners, and stout pickets, extended in between. It was at Fort Henry that one of the major battles on the western frontier took place. About 500 Wyandot Indians supplied with arms by the British, invested the fort in September 1777. The settlers, being aware of the Indians, were all inside the fort before nightfall, but as there were only forty-two fighting men inside the fort, Colonel Shepard needed to send a man to seek for reinforcements. It was our forefather, Ephraim Bates, whom he sent through the Indian lines to Colonel John Evans along the Monongahela River, some 40 miles to the east. Ephraim departed under cover of darkness, with only two men permitted to accompany him, and they for but a few miles. Ephraim completed his daring mission, but when he returned with reinforcements from Colonel Evans, he found the circumstances at Fort Henry greatly changed. While the Fort had held against the enemy with great determination by the men and women inside, two separate companies had been ambushed outside the fort and suffered heavy losses. The Indians had also inflicted heavy economic losses on the community, burning all the cabins surrounding the fort, killing all the horned cattle and smaller stock (about 300), and carrying off all the horses. In a separate attack, a force of militia were ambushed along Wheeling Creek, resulting in further casualties. After another month of duty along the front at Fort Henry, Ephraim was discharged from Captain Enoch’s Company, and returned to his homestead to assist with the harvest before winter. The following year, on the first of June 1778, Ephraim was drafted into service for six months, becoming a sergeant in Capt. Cross’ Company of Virginia Militia. He marched from Catfish Camp to the Beaver River, and joined Col. Broadhead who commanded five hundred regulars. Colonel Broadhead crossed the river and marched down to its mouth, joining his forces to General Mackintosh. Ephraim was then detailed into the artificers company as a butcher, in which capacity he continued to serve until the end of the campaign. Brigadier General Laurens Mackintosh had been given command of the Western Army, consisting of a few Continentals combined with Pennsylvania and Virginia Militia who had been drafted for service to meet the Indian threat in the West77. General Mackintosh had planned to lead an expedition against Fort Detroit, and so control the British and Indian threat on the western pioneers, but the expedition was deemed too expensive by Congress, and so General Mackintosh was to proceed against some of the Indian settlements in the Ohio country. Mackintosh chose to march on the Wyandot settlements on the Upper Sanduskey River, but it was with great difficulty that they got started. It took a great deal of time to muster the soldiers, gather supplies, and then to get permission from the Delaware tribes to cross their lands. Not until October 23rd did the expedition set forth, and they soon stopped at the mouth of the Beaver River to erect Fort Mackintosh, the first American Fort west of the Ohio River, which they fortified with cannon and garrisoned. Then on November 4th they took up a line of march from Fort Mackintosh to the Tuscarawas River, a little south of present day Canton Ohio. After a days march they found the dead body of Lieutenant Parks from the Regulars, and a about a mile further they found the body of David Ropes, together with about forty pounds of beef that Ephraim had been ordered to issue to the “friendly Indians”. Not until November 18th did they reach the Tuscarawas River, halfway to the Wyandot Villages on the Sanduskey, but provisions were running dangerously low and the winter was already setting in. Thus it became increasingly clear that an attack on the Wyandot Villages could not be undertaken that year, so instead a fort was built, named Fort Laurens, as a staging ground for an attack next spring. By December 9th the fort was completed, and the miltia, about to complete their terms of service, were ready to return to their homes. While at Fort Laurens, Ephraim reports that a difficulty arose in procuring hogsheads in which to salt beef; Ephraim solved this dilemma and saved the beef by salting it in a log cabin lined with three or four thicknesses of hides. Also during his stay he reports that a militia company mutinied and marched out of the fort to return home, but were compelled to return to the fort after marching but one mile.

In December General Mackintosh departed the fort, leaving it garrisoned by 150 men under the command of Colonel Gibson, and marched the rest of his army back to Fort Pitt, where Ephraim was discharged in the last of December, having served six months. On his return march, Ephraim reports the army “suffered so much for want of provisions that the men were compelled to eat the hides of the cattle that had been butchered as they went out”. One can only imagine the welcome he received from his wife Susannah, who had just born a son in November, and by his other young children. Like many other farmers, Ephraim did not see any further action for the rest of the war, being needed to work on the family farm78, and feeling that he could best protect his family and farm by remaining at home79. Ephraim did volunteer again for duty with the Pennsylvania Militia in 1782. He is listed as a Sergeant in the First Battalion of Washington County, recruited at Fort Lindley80, but this battalion did not see action81. While Ephraim was fighting for his country in the summer of 1777, a minister had arrived at Ten Mile Creek, Thaddeus Dodd82. He had been sought by Demas Lindley and Jacob Cook, being from their town of Mendham NJ. Rev. Dodd was educated at Princeton College in the classical studies of Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, and was known as an excellent mathematician. He became the minister of the Presbyterian Church at Ten Mile Creek. The formal organization of the Presbyterian Church occurred in 1781, when twenty-five settlers became members in the house of Jacob Cook. The congregation met in members’ homes until a church building was built at Amity in 1785. Even before a church was built, a large log building was constructed to house a school. The main object of the school was to furnish classical and mathematical instruction to young men and boys somewhat advanced, though it also housed a department for elementary instruction. The settler’s of Ten Mile Creek were descendants of New England Puritans who valued a proper education for their sons and daughters. In fact, the Ten Mile Creek Congregation was known for their “good taste in public speaking, and in church music.” 83 By 1790, Ephraim must have decided that it was time to move across the Ohio. He had a large family, with many sons coming of age to marry, and land would be cheaper in Ohio. Ephraim sold his land to Colonel Daniel McFarland in 179184, but as he did not leave his home until 179785, he must have leased the land, staying on until the Indian troubles were settled. In 1792, a protracted war with the Indians began that was not resolved until 1795 with General Wayne’s victory at Fallen Timbers and the signing of the peace treaty at Greenville86. While waiting for peace in the Ohio country and the opening of its lands for legal settlement, Ephraim’s first two daughters were married, Mary Polly to John Voorhies in 179087, and Phebe to Ezekiel French in 179588. Ephraim and Susannah were also blessed, and maybe a bit surprised, by the birth of twin sons, John and Amos in 1794. In 1797, after 24 years along Ten Mile Creek, and just before the village of Amwell was established, Ephraim moved his family to the flats of Grave Creek, a little south of Wheeling, where he had served during the Revolutionary War. Six months later, he moved straight across the Ohio, a few miles above the mouth of Captina Creek, there he settled for the next 12 years. Not much is known about his stay along Captina Creek, but he is reported to have been one of two commissioners overseeing the first elections in Belmont County Ohio89, and we can be sure that he improved the land before moving on. His son Timothy reports doing a great deal of hunting in the West Virginia hills90, and his son William was also known as a great bear hunter91. The Bates boys probably all hunted, selling the skins to acquire money for land acquisition to the west92, in what would become Noble County Ohio. While at Captina Creek, several more of Ephraim’s children were married: Mary Anne to Samuel Dille (1799)93; William to an Elizabeth (1799)94: Isaac to Katherine Moore (1802)95; and Timothy to Ruth Moore (1804)96. The burgeoning of the Bates family in Noble County Ohio, took place in three townships97. Ephraim, with his sons Daniel and Ezekiel, settled in Center Township along the Buffalo Fork of Wills Creek, near Sarahsville in 180998; “the first to drive a wagon over that route, cutting the timber as he went.”99 Isaac, Timothy, and Ephraim Jr, settled in Seneca Township, along Wills Creek and Mud Run, arriving by 1805100. William, John and Amos, settled in Brookfield, along the Bates Branch of Buffalo Creek by 1810101. Mary Bates Voorhies though was the first to settle in Noble County, settling in Wayne Township with her husband John Voorhies in 1802102. Her sons then moved to Seneca Township, and EphraimVoorhies established the village of Mt Ephraim. The settlement of Noble County began first in the northern part, along Wills Creek, and spread slowly south. Ephraim Bates was the first to settle in Center Township in 1809, registering 160 acres of land along the North Branch of the Little Buffalo Fork of Wills Creek. He was followed the next year by James Dye, and in 1818 his uncle Mathew Ball settled just west of him103.104 With the help of his sons Daniel and Ezekiel, Ephraim cleared his land at age 66, built a grist mill in 1814, and also established one of the earliest orchards in the County. His son Ezekiel bought 160 acres of land along the South Branch of the Buffalo Fork in 1815, adjoining Ephraim’s property, and married Rosanna Johnston in 1817105. In 1829 he founded the Town of Sarahsville with John Devolld106. Daniel married Mary Brothers April 25th, 1814107, and acquired 160 acres of land along the North Branch of the Buffalo Fork, on which he built his home and farm, to which he added another 80 acres in 1824, and then jointly with his brother Isaac added another 80 acres in 1829. Isaac moved to Center Township in 1815, selling his land in Seneca Township to his brother Timothy108. He also acquired 160 acres of land along the North Branch of the Buffalo Fork. He erected a mill upon his farm, which was so arranged that it could be operated by horse-power, or by water power. He also operated a distillery and a sawmill109. The first church in Sarahsville was the Methodist Episcopal Church, and its first meeting-house was built on the south end of town, where the Nicholson Cemetery now stands110. Daniel Pettay was probably the first minister at the church, settling near Sarahsville by 1831111. Mr. Pettay was also a lawyer and a teacher. “Possessed of varied attainments, he was regarded as an oracle in most matters. He was an ardent politician, attached himself to the Whig party, and was one of the prominent leaders of the antislavery cause, and one of the projectors of the underground railroad in Noble County.” Eighty years later, in the Ohio wilderness, Ephraim had found a minister similar in mind and intellect to his childhood pastor Reverend Jacob Green112. There must have been something good about the air in Ohio, or maybe it was the openness of the land, for it was a golden age for the Bates family. Ephraim and his sons all seem to have lived to an advanced age, and they all had very large families. Ephraim lived to be 90, Ezekiel 91, Timothy 89, Daniel 85, William 83, Ephraim Jr. 75 and Isaac 69. Timothy had 14 children, Isaac 13, William 9, Daniel 9, and Ephraim 8; though Ezekiel had only one. Many of the descendants of Timothy and Isaac Bates have remained in Noble County while the other descendants have tended to settle farther west, in Indiana, Iowa, Kansas and Oklahoma. Bethel Bates, the son of Timothy, was elected to the Ohio legislature in 1868, and was a tireless campaigner for the 15th amendment, giving ex-slaves the right to vote113. Daniel Webster Bates, grandson of Isaac, was a prominent educator of Noble County114. Mainly self-taught, he began teaching at age 16. Dighton Bates, grandson of Timothy, was a preacher at the United Brethren church in Center Township115. James and Jacob Bates were noted as prominent farmers of Noble County back in 1904.116 James was the great grandson of Timothy, and Jacob was the grandson of Isaac. Ephraim remained active until age 80, when he broke his thigh.117 In 1830 he and his wife Susannah were living with their son Daniel118. By 1832, when he applied for his Revolutionary War pension, he was unable to travel to the Courthouse. He died soon after, and was buried on his son Isaac’s farm, on a wooded knoll, his wife Susannah is buried next to him119. Eighty years after Ephraim’s death, Dighton Bates put together a Bates Family History, and then organized a family reunion120 held at Caldwell, Ohio, Sept 16-18, 1913121. “The program consisted of formal addresses, declarations, informal speeches and music.” The organizers of the reunion reported that “tradition gives his ancestors as coming from Wales.” Since 1936, an annual reunion has been held by the descendants of Ephraim Bates, and more recently a headstone was placed on his burial, upon the land that Isaac Bates’ cleared, and now known as the McWilliams Farm122. The headstone reads, “Ephraim Bates, Sergeant, Continental Army, Rev War, May 24 1743, Jan 12 1834.” His was a pioneering life, well lived, with rich adventures, and close family ties. 1 Stephen Bates, Concerning the Bates of Hanover New Jersey, Their Ancestry and Some of Their Descendants, p. 6. Ancestry.com, Stories and Publications. 2 Ephraim Bates, Revolutionary War Pension Statement. New Jersey Historical Society, Special Collections, Bates Family. 3 History of the First Presbyterian Church of Morristown, N.J. Part 1. Records of Trustees and Sessions from 1742-1882, p.13. 4 E. H. Gillett, The History of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, Rev. Ed. Vol I. Philadelphia: Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work, p. 90. 5 Walter Beach Plumb Genealogical Collection, Notebook #3, (Bates, Harrison, Jones, Farrand Family Notes). The New Jersey Historical Society Library, Manuscript Collection. 6 Charles B. Stuart, Lives and Works of Civil and Military Engineers of America. New York: D. Van Nostrand, Publisher, 1871, p. 91. 7 Letter of David S. Bates, 1979. North Jersey History and Genealogy Center, Morristown Library, Bates Folder. 8 Tombstone of Rachel Bates daughter of Thomas in Hanover church-yard, notes her birth as 1714. 9 Elizabeth R. Myrose and Clare B. Kitchell, Along the Whippanong: A History of Hanover Township, New Jersey, 2nd ed. N.p. : Hanover Township Committee, 1976, p. 35. 10 Nathaniel B. Sylvester, History of Ulster County, New York. Philadelphia: Everts and Park, 1880. 11 11 Walter S. Nichols, Early Newark: A Puritan Theocracy. Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Vol V New Series, No 4, Oct 1920, p. 4-6. 12 Andrew M. Sherman, Historic Morristown New Jersey: The Story of Its First Century. Morristown, N.J.: The Howard Publishing company, 1905, p. 27-28, 38-39. 13 Atlas of Morris County New Jersey. New York: F.W. Beers, A.D. Ellis & G.G. Soule, 1868, p. 27. 14 James Cory, Lineal ancestors of Susan Mulford, 1937. Vol IV, Part 1 p. 65-71. Vol IV, Part II p. 147-175. 15 List of Rateables in the Township of Hanover, 1798 & 1802, David and William Bates. Held at the New Jersey State Archives Library, Trenton NJ. 16 John Davies, A History of Wales. Penguin Books 1993, pg. 288. 17 Edward G. Hartmann, Americans From Wales. Boston: The Christopher Publishing House, 1967, p. 32, 39,40. 18 Andrew M. Sherman, Historic Morristown New Jersey: The Story of Its First Century. Morristown, N.J.: The Howard Publishing company, 1905, p. 26. 19 John Davies, A History of Wales. Penguin Books 1993, p. 315. 20 Andrew M. Sherman, Historic Morristown New Jersey: The Story of Its First Century. Morristown, N.J.: The Howard Publishing company, 1905, p. 25. 21 Elizabeth R. Myrose and Clare B. Kitchell, Along the Whippanong: A History of Hanover Township, New Jersey, 2nd ed. N.p.: Hanover Township Committee, 1976, p. 19. 22 Elizabeth R. Myrose and Clare B. Kitchell, Along the Whippanong: A History of Hanover Township, New Jersey, 2nd ed. N.p.: Hanover Township Committee, 1976, p. 106-107. 23 David Mitros, Jacob Green and the Slavery Debate, In Revolutionary Morris County, New Jersey. The Morris County Heritage Commision 1993. 24 Church Members, Marriages & Baptisms at Hanover, Morris Co., N. J. During the Pastorate of Rev. Jacob Green and to the settlement of Rev. Aaron Condit, 1746-1796. 25 Grace Kitchel Ford 26 Elizabeth R. Myrose and Clare B. Kitchell, Along the Whippanong: A History of Hanover Township, New Jersey, 2nd ed. N.p.: Hanover Township Committee, 1976, p. 31. 27 Clara J. Stone, Genealogy of the Descendants of Jaspar Griffing, 1881. Paper held on Ancestry.com under stories and histories, p. 17-18, 34-35, 38-39. In this paper Elizabeth Griffing’s husband is incorrectly given as their son Martin Bates, though the daughters Abigail and Parnel are correctly listed. I assume the mistake was made because their daughter Abigail names her first son after her brother Martin. 28 Abstract of New Jersey Wills, 1760-1770, Will of Thomas Bates of Hanover. 29 Andrew M. Sherman, Historic Morristown New Jersey: The Story of Its First Century. Morristown, N.J.: The Howard Publishing company, 1905, p. 72. 30 Charles B. Stuart, Lives and Works of Civil and Military Engineers of America. New York: D. Van Nostrand, Publisher, 1871, p. 91-108. 31 History of Morris County New Jersey. New York: W.W. Munsell & Co. 1882, p. 27. 32 List of Rateables in the Township of Pequonock 1782, Uzal Bates. 33 James Cory, Lineal ancestors of Susan Mulford, 1937. Vol IV, Part 1 p. 65-71. Vol IV, Part II p. 147-175. 12 34 History of Morris County New Jersey. New York: W.W. Munsell & Co. 1882, p.34. 35 Church Members, Marriages & Baptisms at Hanover, Morris Co., N. J. During the Pastorate of Rev. Jacob Green and to the settlement of Rev. Aaron Condit, 1746-1796, p. 32. 36 History of the First Presbyterian Church of Morristown, N.J. Part 1. Records of Trustees and Sessions from 1742-1882, p. 61. 37 Bates notes, Charles Gardiner Collection, New Jersey Historical Society. 38 Percy Crayon, Records of Rockaway, Morris County, N. J., Families. Rockaway, N. J.: Rockaway Publishing Co., 1902, p. 62. 39 Abstract of New Jersey Wills, 1760-1770, Will of William Bates of Pequannock. 40 Helen Wright Papers, Manuscript Group 1460, Box 1, Correspondence with Benjamin Young, W.L. Bates and Ervin McElroy (1967), notes on Bates genealogy (1740). The New Jersey Historical Society Library, Manuscript Collection. 41History of Morris County New Jersey. New York: W.W. Munsell & Co. 1882, p. 26,27. 42 Helen Wright Papers, Manuscript Group 1460, Box 1, Correspondence with Benjamin Young, W.L. Bates and Ervin McElroy (1967), notes on Bates genealogy (1740). The New Jersey Historical Society Library, Manuscript Collection. 43 Helen Wright Papers, Manuscript Group 1460, Box 1, Correspondence with Benjamin Young, W.L. Bates and Ervin McElroy (1967), notes on Bates genealogy (1740). The New Jersey Historical Society Library, Manuscript Collection. 44 Ancestry.com, Family Data Collections – Births. Mary Polly Bates’ birth is given as March 15, 1769. 45 Percy Crayon, Records of Rockaway, Morris County, N. J., Families. Rockaway, N. J.: Rockaway Publishing Co., 1902, p. 66. 46 Percy Crayon, Records of Rockaway, Morris County, N. J., Families. Rockaway, N. J.: Rockaway Publishing Co., 1902, p. 165. 47 Ancestry.com, U.S. and International Marriage Records 1560-1900 lists 1776 as date of birth for Uzal’s first child Mary Bates Fox. 48 O.D. Bates, Some Descendants of William Bates of Newton Creek and Edward Hazen. Baltimore: Gateway Press Inc., 1977, p. 16. 49 Cory’s of America: Ancestors and Descendants, First Ed. Jacksonville FL: Al Bertus Cory, 1991, p. 29. 50 N. Earle Wharton, William Bates of Hanover, Morris Co., N.J., and some of his descendants. Bates Bulletin, Series II, Vol III, Number 2, April 1915, p. 68-72. 51 Joseph Smith, Old Redstone or, Historical sketches of Western Presbyterianism, Its Early Ministers, Its Perilous times, and Its First Records. Philadelphis: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854, p. 30,31. 52 Joseph H. Bausman, History of Beaver County, Pennsylvania; and its Centenial Celebration . New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1904, p. 134, Outline Map of Virginia Claims in South-Western Pennsylvania. 53 U.S. Census 1850, Mill Township, Grant County, Indiana, p. 12. 54 Bethel Cemetery Transcriptions, p. 2. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ingrant/bethel.htm 55 Joseph Smith, Old Redstone or, Historical sketches of Western Presbyterianism, Its Early Ministers, Its Perilous times, and Its First Records. Philadelphis: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854, p. 139. 13 56 History of Morris County New Jersey. New York: W.W. Munsell & Co. 1882, p. 248. 57 Ancestry.com, Family Data Collections – Births. Mary Polly Bates’ birth is given as March 15, 1769. 58 N. Earle Wharton, William Bates of Hanover, Morris Co., N.J., and some of his descendants. Bates Bulletin, Series II, Vol III, Number 2, April 1915, p. 70, gives birth year for Isaac. 59 Joseph Smith, Old Redstone or, Historical sketches of Western Presbyterianism, Its Early Ministers, Its Perilous times, and Its First Records. Philadelphis: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854, p. 139. 60 Map of Land Warrants for Amwell Township. 61 Boyd Crumrine, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882, p. 658, 660. 62 Map of Land Warrants for Amwell Township. 63 Joseph Smith, Old Redstone or, Historical sketches of Western Presbyterianism, Its Early Ministers, Its Perilous times, and Its First Records. Philadelphis: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854, p. 31. 64 Boyd Crumrine, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882, p. 655. 65 Tombstone of Phebe Bates French gives her year of birth. 66 N. Earle Wharton, William Bates of Hanover, Morris Co., N.J., and some of his descendants. Bates Bulletin, Series II, Vol III, Number 2, April 1915, p. 68-72, gives birth year for Timothy. 67 US Census of 1790 for Washington County, PA, lists an Eph Bates with two males over 16, four male children, and four females, indicating that either Isaac or William had moved out, and that two males had not yet been born. Amos we know was born in 1794, John we think was living with his brother William in 1820, who has one male listed as between 18 and 26. Thus we guess that John too was born in 1794, and was the twin brother of Amos. 68 Boyd Crumrine, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882, p. 658, 69 Lewis Clark Walkenshaw, Annals of Southwestern Pennsylvania, Vol II. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Co, Inc p. 223, 226. Ephraim’s neighbors are all listed as building these forts, along with a “John Bates”. 70 Joseph Doddridge, Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of the Western Parts of Virginia and Pennsylvania from 1763 to 1783. Pittsburgh, PA: John S. Ritenour & Wm. T. Lindsey, 1912, p. 94. 71 Joseph Doddridge, Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of the Western Parts of Virginia and Pennsylvania from 1763 to 1783. Pittsburgh, PA: John S. Ritenour & Wm. T. Lindsey, 1912, p. 171-174. 72 C.W. Butterfield, The Washington-Crawford Letters. Being the Correspondence between George Washington and William Crawford from 1767 to 1781, concerning Western Land. Robert Clark & Co., 1877, p. 89-93. 73 Joseph Doddridge, Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of the Western Parts of Virginia and Pennsylvania from 1763 to 1783. Pittsburgh, PA: John S. Ritenour & Wm. T. Lindsey, 1912, p. 95. 14 74 R. Douglas Hurt, The Ohio Frontier, Crucible of the Old Northwest, 1720-1830. Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 1996, p.76. 75 Ephraim Bates, Revolutionary War Pension Statement. New Jersey Historical Society, Special Collections, Bates Family. 76 Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Virginia. Charleston S.C.: Babcock & Co., 1845, p. 409-413. 77 R. Douglas Hurt, The Ohio Frontier, Crucible of the Old Northwest, 1720-1830. Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 1996, p.78-81. 78 John Ferling, Almost A Miracle, the American Victory in the War of Independence. Oxford University Press, 2007, p. 194-197. 79 Boyd Crumrine, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882, p. 91. 80 Howard L. Lecky, The Tenmile Country and Its Pioneer Families. Green County Historical Society, 1950, p39. 81 Boyd Crumrine, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882, p. 134-136. 82 Joseph Smith, Old Redstone or, Historical sketches of Western Presbyterianism, Its Early Ministers, Its Perilous times, and Its First Records. Philadelphis: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854, p. 139-150. 83 Joseph Smith, Old Redstone or, Historical sketches of Western Presbyterianism, Its Early Ministers, Its Perilous times, and Its First Records. Philadelphis: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854, p. 145. 84 Boyd Crumrine, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882, p. 655. 85 Ephraim Bates, Revolutionary War Pension Statement. New Jersey Historical Society, Special Collections, Bates Family. 86 R. Douglas Hurt, The Ohio Frontier, Crucible of the Old Northwest, 1720-1830. Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 1996, p.111-142. 87History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 471, notes Mary’s first son Aaron born in Pennsylvania 1791. 88 Doris French Smith, Phebe Bates. E-mail concerning ancestry, date of marriage, and pictures of tombstone indicating Phebe is the daughter of Ephraim Bates. 89 A.T. McKelvey, Centenial History of Belmont County Ohio. Chicago: Biographical Publishing Co., 1903, p. 48. 90 Dighton Bates, Bates Family History. Paper at the Caldwell Ohio Public Library, Sec 3, p. 1. 91 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 427. 92 A.T. McKelvey, Centenial History of Belmont County Ohio. Chicago: Biographical Publishing Co., 1903, p. 39. 93 J.A. Caldwell, History of Belmont and Jefferson County Ohio. Wheeling, W.Va.: Historical Publishing Co.,1880, p. 426. 94 William’s first child Mary was born Nov 22, 1799. From her headstone in Bethel Cemetery, Mill Township, Grant County, Indiana, we know his wife’s name was Elizabeth. 95 Ancestry.com, U.S. and International Marriage Records 1560-1900 lists 1803 as birth year for Daniel their first son. 15 96 A.T. McKelvey, Centenial History of Belmont County Ohio. Chicago: Biographical Publishing Co., 1903, p. 52. 97 L.R. Kocher, Surname Index, Ohio River Survey, congressional Lands, Noble Co Ohio. 98 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 335, 338, 345. 99 Dighton Bates, Bates Family History. Paper at the Caldwell Ohio Public Library, Sec 2, p. 1. 100 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 466-468. 101 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 427-429. 102 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 508, 511. 103 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p. 338. 104 Joseph Harrison Vance, Descendants to the Third Generation of Edward Ball. Charles Gardiner Collection, New Jersey Historical Society. 105 Ruth Hart, Morgan County, Bates records for Morgan, Monroe and Guernsey County. E-mail to Thomas Scanlon. 106 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p 118. 107 N. Earle Wharton, William Bates of Hanover, Morris Co., N.J., and some of his descendants. Bates Bulletin, Series II, Vol III, Number 2, April 1915, p. 70, reports that Danile Bates married Mary Brothers, and Jordan Dodd, Liahona Research, Ohio Marriages 1803-1900, data base on Ancestry.com, lists date of marriage for David Bates and Mary Brothers, David probably being the incorrect transcription of Daniel. 108 Dighton Bates, Bates Family History. Paper at the Caldwell Ohio Public Library, Sec 2, p. 5. 109 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p 340. 110 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p 347. 111 History of Noble County Ohio. Chicago: L.H. Watkins & Co., 1887, p 343. 112 Ephraim Bates’ Revolutionary War Pension Statement mentions Daniel Petty, a Clergyman resident in said neighborhood being absent on a journey. 113 Frank M. Morton, The County of Noble. Madison, Wis.: Selwyn A Brant, 1904, p. 159. 114 Frank M. Morton, The County of Noble. Madison, Wis.: Selwyn A Brant, 1904, p. 169. 115 Frank M. Morton, The County of Noble. Madison, Wis.: Selwyn A Brant, 1904, p. 170. 116 Frank M. Morton, The County of Noble. Madison, Wis.: Selwyn A Brant, 1904, p. 166, 171. 117 Ephraim Bates, Revolutionary War Pension Statement. New Jersey Historical Society, Special Collections, Bates Family. 118 US Census of 1830 for Union Township, Monroe County, Ohio, lists a Danile Bates with a male and female over age eighty. 119 Dighton Bates, Bates Family History. Paper at the Caldwell Ohio Public Library, Sec 3, p. 39. 120 Dighton Bates, Bates Family History. Paper at the Caldwell Ohio Public Library, Sec 3, p. 39. 121 A Bates Family Reunion at Caldwell, Ohio. Bates Bulletin, Series II, Vol II, Number 1, September 1913, p. 26. 16 122 Dighton Bates, Bates Family History. Paper at the Caldwell Ohio Public Library, Sec 3, p.39.

User ID

User ID: D63418FA2E47A546A1E4C80545544615C249

Data Changed

Data Changed:
Date: 14 Mar 2000
Time: 00:38:56

Prior to import, this record was last changed 00:38:56 14 Mar 2000.

Sources

  • WikiTree profile Bates-1171 created through the import of rgy_complete.ged on Jun 23, 2011 by Robert York. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Robert and others.




Biography

This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import. It's a rough draft and needs to be edited.

Name

William /Bates/[1][2][3][4]

Birth

1720
Hanover Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USA[5][6]
1716
1718
Whippany, Hunterdon, New Jersey, USA

Found multiple copies of BIRT DATE. Using 1720

Death

between 8 Dec 1767 and 1770
1770
Pequannock Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USA
25 Nov 1766
Hanover Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USA
1767
Pequannock Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USA

Found multiple copies of DEAT DATE. Using 1770Array

Occupation

bondsman for Zeruah Garner, widow and administratrix of Samuel Garner’s intestate estate
21 May 1751

Note

Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=4f4b2996-5250-4c25-a1cc-bb85113b6295&tid=15289954&pid=744
Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=c98573bc-1e8a-4fe4-bc5d-c81954117d77&tid=15289954&pid=744
Thomas Bates of Hanover NJ and his descendants
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=9d556b67-e3ef-42ee-bfe3-cef2af8dae4e&tid=15289954&pid=744

Marriage

FAM
@P744@
@P743@
@P637@
to Father: Natural
to Mother: Natural
@P750@
to Father: Natural
to Mother: Natural
06 Aug 1741
Gloucester, New Jersey, USA[7]
FAM
@P744@
@P754@
@P751@
to Father: Natural
to Mother: Natural
@P755@
to Father: Natural
to Mother: Natural
@P756@
to Father: Natural
to Mother: Natural
@P757@
to Father: Natural
to Mother: Natural
Pequannock Twp., Morris, New Jersey, USA[8]
Gloucester, New Jersey, USA[9]

Sources

  • Source: S-2067411958 Repository: #R-2139939163 Title: New Jersey Marriages, 1684-1895 Author: Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2001.Original data - See Description for original data sources listed by county.Original data: See Description for original data sources listed by county. Note: APID: 1,4480::0
  • Repository: R-2139939163 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Note:
  • Source: S-2067411976 Repository: #R-2139939163 Title: American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) Author: Godfrey Memorial Library, comp. Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data - Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genea Note: APID: 1,3599::0
  • Source: S-2067411980 Repository: #R-2139939163 Title: U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Author: Yates Publishing Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was derived Note: APID: 1,7836::0
  • Source: S-2067412026 Repository: #R-2139939163 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Trees Note: Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=15289954&pid=744
  1. Source: #S-2067411976 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=agbi&h=469654&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1720 Birth place: New Jersey APID: 1,3599::469654
  2. Source: #S-2067411980 Page: Source number: 881.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: JAW. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=worldmarr_ga&h=1226679&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1726 Birth place: Marriage date: 1741 Marriage place: NJ APID: 1,7836::1226679
  3. Source: #S-2067411980 Page: Source number: 881.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: JAW. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=worldmarr_ga&h=75013&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1726 Birth place: Marriage date: 1741 Marriage place: NJ APID: 1,7836::75013
  4. Source: #S-2067411958 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=njmarr1684&h=18180&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Marriage date: 06 Aug 1741 Marriage place: Gloucester, NJ APID: 1,4480::18180
  5. Source: #S-2067411976 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=agbi&h=469654&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1720 Birth place: New Jersey APID: 1,3599::469654
  6. Source: #S-2067411980 Page: Source number: 881.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: JAW. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=worldmarr_ga&h=75013&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1726 Birth place: Marriage date: 1741 Marriage place: NJ APID: 1,7836::75013
  7. Source: #S-2067412026 Page: Cited in the family tree "Trees of Vorhies" created by "1776treeparty" Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/18064206/person/880141924 Note: Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=1010
  8. Source: #S-2067411980 Page: Source number: 881.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: JAW. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=worldmarr_ga&h=75013&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1726 Birth place: Marriage date: 1741 Marriage place: NJ APID: 1,7836::75013
  9. Source: #S-2067411958 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=njmarr1684&h=18180&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Marriage date: 06 Aug 1741 Marriage place: Gloucester, NJ APID: 1,4480::18180

Acknowledgments

Thank you to Hope Moore for creating WikiTree profile Bates-3209 through the import of Moore _ Grant Family Tree.ged on Mar 3, 2013.

Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Hope and others.









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