Gundioc  Bourgogne

Gundioc Bourgogne

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Gundioc (Gondioc) "King of the Burgundians, Condiaco, Candiacus, Gondioc, Conthaires, Gundachar, Gunderic, Gundioc, Gundioch, Gundiok, Gundovech, Gundowch" Bourgogne
Born [date unknown] in Bourgogne, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, Francemap
Son of and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Died about in Borbetomagus (Worms), Bourgogne, Francemap
9 November 2015
00:36: Bree Ogle edited the Biography for Gondioc Bourgogne. [Thank Bree for this]
This page has been accessed 7,899 times.

Gundioc (d. 473), King of the Burgundians[2]



According to Cawley (2006), Gundioc is related to, "the family of King Athanaric," (d. 381).

Father: Gundahar (d. after 436)[3]

Mother: UNKNOWN[1]


There is no evidence for spouses and/or mothers of his children.

Gundiac, had four (4) sons by unknown mother(s):[4]

  • Gundobad (d. 516), King of Burgundy: Geneva[5]
m. Carotena (d. 506). Issue 4.
  • Godegisel (d. 500), King of Burgundy: Besançon
murdered by Gundobad
No known issue.
  • Gondomar (d. 486), King of Burgundy: Vienne
murdered by Gundobad
No known issue.
  • Chilperic (d. 486). King of Burgundy: Lyon[6]
murdered by Gundobad
m. UNKNOWN. Issue: 2 surviving dau (line descends through Clotilde)


"Bourgogne (French), Burgund (German), Burgundy (English) is an area historically part of modern France and Switzerland. It was inhabited by Celts, Romans (Gallo-Romans), Burgundians (a Germanic tribe) and by the Franks.

For a brief historical time this area was controlled by the Burgundians, filling the void left by the collapse of the western half of the Roman Empire. "In A.D. 411, they crossed the Rhine and established a kingdom at Worms. Amidst repeated clashes between the Romans and Huns, the Burgundian kingdom eventually occupied what is today the borderlands between Switzerland, France, and Italy. In 534, the Franks defeated Godomar, the last Burgundian king, and absorbed the territory into their growing empire."[2]

In 411 AD, Gundahar/Gundicar, King of Burgundy, and Goar, King of the Alans, placed a puppet emperor, Jovinus, on the throne of Gaul. The Alans and others had previously crossed the Rhine and invaded Gaul. With the authority of this puppet, Jovinus, Gundahar settled the west bank of the Rhine, and seized Worms, Speyer, and Strasbourg. The Emperor Honorius later granted the land to Gundahar, refered to as "commander of the Burgundians"

As frequently happens, the Burgundians, not content with what they had on the Rhine, continued raids into Roman upper Gallia Belgica. In 436, these raids were brought to an end. The Roman general, Flavius Aetius, recruited Hun mercenaries. They fought and overwhelmed the Rhineland kingdom kiling Gundahar and a majority of the Burgundian tribe.[7]


  • Cawley, C. (2006). Medieval Lands v.3[8]

badges This person was a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in Europe. If you are interested in this profile, see our European Royals and Aristocrats Prior to 742 Project.

  1. Notice of resolution of ambiguous parentage: Parents edited in accordance the European Aristocracts project. Medieval genealogy is not exact, and collaborative genealogy must occasionally make choices where old-fashioned print-scholarship did not have to. The parents (or lack of) described for this profile, were decided in consultation with primary sources, especially as collected in the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy’s Medieval Lands project.[1]
  2. article on Burgundy (Dead Link)

This profile managed by the European Aristocrats project. WikiTree users most welcome to participate.

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Memories: 1

On June 29, 2011 Ted Williams wrote:

Gondioc (Proto-Germanic: *Gunþawīgaz; died 473), also called Gundioc, Condiaco, Candiacus and Gundowech, was king of Burgundy following the destruction of Worms by the Huns in 436, succeeding Gundahar. Gondiocs sister married Ricimer (according to S. Mitchell "A history of the later roman empire"), the Gothic general at the time ruling the Western Roman Empire.

Gundobad, the son of Gondioc, succeeded Ricimer in 472, but abdicated after the death of his father in the following year as Gondioc was succeeded by his brother Chilperic I. After the death of Chilperic, Burgundy was divided among the sons of Gondioc, Gundobad, Chilperic II of Burgundy, Godomar and Godegisel.

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No known carriers of Gondioc's Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA have taken yDNA or mtDNA tests and no close relatives have taken a 23andMe, AncestryDNA, or Family Tree DNA "Family Finder" test.

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Images: 2
Gondioc Bourgogne Image 1
Gondioc Bourgogne Image 1

Gondioc Bourgogne Image 2
Gondioc Bourgogne Image 2


On September 2, 2014 at 18:39GMT Vic Watt wrote:

Burgunder-7 and Bourgogne-35 appear to represent the same person because: Please merge. Thanks.

On February 16, 2012 at 23:39GMT Bill Fikes wrote:

Language Translation

Català: Gondioc Deutsch: Gundioch English: Gondioc Español: Gondioc Français: Gondioc Frysk: Gundiok Galego: Gundioc Magyar: Gunderich burgund király Italiano: Gundioco Nederlands: Gundioc Português: Gondioc Русский: Гундиох Srpskohrvatski/Српскохрватски: Gundioh Svenska: Gundioc

Gondioc is 40 degrees from Kevin Bacon, 42 degrees from AJ Jacobs, 69 degrees from Lisa Kudrow, 49 degrees from Kurt Vonnegut and 39 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II of the Commonwealth Realms on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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