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William Cahoon

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William Cahoon aka Cohoon
Born about in Baronies of Luss or Tully-Colquhoun, Alexandria, Dunbartonshire, Scotland
Husband of — married in Newport, Rhode Island, USA
Died in Rehoboth, Bristol, MA, USA
This page has been accessed 882 times.

At some point a determination needs to be made regarding the LNAB for William, Cahoon, Cohoon or Colquhoun

Contents

Biography

William Cahoon|Cohoon|Colquhoun was a Scot who was sent to New England as an indentured servant in 1651. William was born about 1633, possibly in a small village in the vicinity of Luss or Tully-Colquhoun ( now possibly Tullichewan), in present day Alexandria, Dunbartonshire on the western shore of Loch Lomond, lands in the western highlands of Scotland that are the ancestral home of Clan Colquhoun. The present villages of Luss and Tullichewan are located less than nine miles apart, which were part of the Baronies of Luss/Colquhouns in the 17th Century.

The lands of the Clan Colquhoun (called Tully-Colquhoun or Tillyquhoun; and then Tullichewan) were on the shores of Loch Lomond[1]. During the reign of Alexander II of Scotland, Umphredus de Kilpatrick received from Malduin, Earl of Lennox, the estates of Colquhoun, Auchentorily and Dumbuck[1]. The Clan Colquhoun chief's early stronghold was at Dunglass Castle, which is perched on a rocky promontory by the River Clyde.[4] Dunglass was also close to the royal Dumbarton Castle, of which later chiefs of Clan Colquhoun were appointed governors and keepers[1].
in 1635, the chief's titles were that of the Baronet of Luss which came to the Colquhouns when Sir Robert of Colquhoun married the heiress of the Lord of Luss in about 1368[1], then assuming the baroncy established in 1150; the Baronet of Colquhoun, granted about 1240; and the Baronet of Nova Scotia established in 1625.
Today the Colquhoun Clan Centre is located in Luss, on the banks of Loch Lomond[2].

The events that led to William’s forced relocation to New England had their start with the English civil wars which began in 1642 between the royalist supporters of the Catholic Stuart monarchy and the parliamentarians. By 1650, the Scots had joined the Stuart royalists in rebellion against the English Commonwealth. The Colquhouns, including eighteen-year-old William, joined with thousands of other Scots to fight Oliver Cromwell’s army.

On September 2, 1650, at the town of Dunbar, Dunbartonshire, on southeastern coast of Scotland, the Scots were defeated. Cromwell estimated that three thousand Scots died in battle and ten thousand were taken prisoner. William was among a group of about three thousand prisoners held in Durham cathedral, and was one of the approximately 600 men who survived the imprisonment. In early November of 1650, the first shipments of surviving prisoners were sent as indentured servants to Maine and Massachusetts.

William was shipped out in 1651, indentured to work in the iron works at Braintree (now known as Quincy) and Taunton, Massachusetts. The site of the iron works in Quincy is located on Crescent Street in West Quincy, next to St. Mary’s Church and Hall Cemetery. The Taunton iron works site (in what is now Raynham) [3] .

Most of the survivors were sent to staff labor starved English colonial ventures in the West Indies, Virginia, Massachusetts, Maine, and Ireland. William was among those purchased by Bex & CO. and sent aboard the Ship Unity across the wintry seas of the Atlantic Ocean. The Unity was built by Ben Gilliam of Boston in 1649 and skippered by Augustine Walker of Charlotstown, Mass. They arrived at Saugus (Lynn) Ironworks in early April 1651 [4] .

William's older brother John, was captured at Dunbar as well. John either died at sea aboard the English ship "John & Mary" or very shortly after arriving in the colonies [5] .


Name

Name: William Colquhoun /Cahoon/[6]
Name: William /Cahoon/[7]

Found multiple versions of NAME. Using William Colquhoun /Cahoon/.

Birth

Birth: William was born about 1633, in a small village in the Vale of Leven, now West Alexandria, Dunbartonshire on the western shore of Loch Lomond, lands in the western highlands of Scotland that are the ancestral home of Clan Colquhoun in the Baronies of Luss/Colquhouns . Another theory for his birth suggests that he was born in London, England[8] if he were actually son of Sir John Colquhoun.

Parentage

There is conflict regarding the parentage of William Cahoon. William Colquhoun (1633-1675) claimed Citation Needed in his later years that he was the son of Sir John Colquhoun. While there are no official records to prove this relationship, William's birth occurs not long after John and Katherine's elopement and Sir John would have had motive to keep the existance of any child he had with Katherine a secret since such offspring could have been used as proof of his 'incest' with Katherine. It should be noted that William is not a name used by the Colquhouns, but is common within the Graham family.[9] More research is necessary to establish true parentage.

Emigration

On September 2, 1650, at the town of Dunbar, on southeastern coast of Scotland, the Scots were defeated. Cromwell estimated that three thousand Scots died in battle and ten thousand were taken prisoner. William was among a group of about three thousand prisoners held in Durham cathedral, and was one of the approximately 600 men who survived the imprisonment. In early November of 1650, the first shipments of surviving prisoners were sent as indentured servants to Maine and Massachusetts.

William was among the those prisoners purchased by Bex & CO. and sent aboard the Ship Unity across the wintry seas of the Atlantic Ocean. The Unity was built by Ben Gilliam of Boston in 1649 and skippered by Augustine Walker of Charlottstown, Mass. They arrived at Saugus (Lynn) Ironworks in early April 1651. [10]

William was shipped out in 1651, indentured to work in the iron works at Braintree (now known as Quincy) and Taunton, Massachusetts.

Occupation

Brick maker - Iron worker

Marriage

William married: Deliverance Peck, b. 1637, daughter of Joseph Peck, in 1662, either on Block Island, then, Mass Bay Colony, or in Newport, Rhode Island. William married Deliverence Peck on 26 JUN 1662 at Block Island, then, Mass. Bay Colony.[11]

Children

William and Deliverance Peck had the following children[12]:

  • 1. Joseph (1655) Cohoon b: 1655 in > Bristol, RI; m1 Elizabeth Warwich; m2 Hannah Kent (b: 2 JUL 1667) at Bristol, Bristol, Rhode Island[13]

1658 Block Island was sold by Mass. Bay Colony.

  • 2. Samuel (1663) Cohoon b: ABT 1663 in Block Island, Newport, RI; m1 Mary Hunter b: BEF 1679 in Nansemond, VA. Possibly two other marriages.
  • 3. Mary Cohoon b: 1664 in Block Island, Newport, RI; m1 Thomas Jones.
  • 4. William (1665) Cohoon b: ABT 1665 in Block Island, Newport, RI (1669?); m1 Elizabeth Nickerson b: 1676 in Chatham, Barnstable, MA. Possible 2nd marriage ca. 1690 in Chatham, Barnstable, MA.
  • 5. Archibald Cohoon b: 1665 in Block Island, Newport, RI
  • 6. Agnus Cohoon b: 1667 in Block Island, Newport, RI
  • 7.James (1670) Cohoon b: 15 FEB 1670 in Block Island, Newport, RI; m1 Mary Davis, m2 Martha Unknown.

Block Island was incorporated by the Rhode Island general assembly in 1672.

  • 8. John (1673) Cohoon b: 9 MAR 1673 in Block Island, RI, or Newport, RI; m1 Martha Rawley; m2 Comfort Peet b: ABT 1694 in Swansea, Bristol, MA.
  • 9. Nathaniel (1675) Cohoon b: 2 FEB 1675 in Block Island, RI, or Newport, RI; m1 Jane Jones.
Block Island History. In 1524, what later became known as Block Island was sighted by Giovanni da Verrazzano, who named it "Claudia", in honor of Claude, Duchess of Brittany, queen consort of France and the wife of Francis I. However, several contemporaneous maps identified the same island as "Luisa," after Louise of Savoy, the Queen Mother of France, and the mother of Francis I. Verrazano's ship log stated that the island was "full of hilles, covered with trees, well-peopled for we saw fires all along the coaste." In 1614, Block Island was charted by the Dutch explorer Adrian Block, who named it for himself. An expedition from the Boston area arrived in 1636 led by John Endecott, and the island initially became part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which in 1658 sold the island to a group of men headed up by Endecott, who had led the 1636 expedition. In 1661, the Endecott group sold the island to a party of sixteen settlers, led by John Alcock, who are today memorialized at Settler's Rock, near Cow's Cove. As these settlers had an allegiance to Rhode Island on several levels, Block Island was incorporated by the Rhode Island general assembly in 1672, and the island government adopted the name "New Shoreham." A Dutch map of 1685 clearly shows Block Island, indicated as Adriaen Blocks Eylant ("Adrian Block's Island").

Death

On June 24, 1675, the residents of Swansea attended religious services. As they returned home they were attacked by Indians; several of the colonists were killed and others seriously wounded. The survivors, including William and Deliverance and their seven children, gathered in the home of Reverend John Miles. The wounded needed medical help. William and another man volunteered to go to the neighboring town of Rehoboth and return with a doctor, and the two men left that evening. Their mutilated bodies were found the next day. William Cahoon died at age forty-two, leaving Deliverance with young children to care for in the midst of war between the colonists and the Indian confederation.

The site of the Miles house, known as the Miles Garrison House, is located at the west end of Miles Bridge in Swansea, just south of the Swansea/Rehoboth line, and just north of where William Cahoon’s residence and brick works would have been located. The bridge crosses the Palmer River. A plaque erected at the site in 1912 lists the names of the eleven colonists who died at Swansea, including the name of “William Cahoone.”

William died on 22 JUN 1675 at Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States. He was among the first to die at the start of the King Philips War. William while seeking help during an attack was ambushed by Indians very near the cemetery. He was killed and mutilated. His body was discovered the next day and may have been buried at the Rehoboth Cemetery (now Palmer River Churchyard Cemetery), Bristol County, Massachusetts, USA.

Sources

  • Family Tree: William Cahoon (Colquhoun) and Deliverance Peck, Comments By Frederick W. Graham, 2013-03-26 [1]
  • Find-a-Grave Website: Profile created by: David Cahoon, Record added: Apr 17, 2008, Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818; [2]
  • Information on William Cahoon from Deborah A. Cahoon Didick, "Famous and Infamous Cahoons" (s.l.: Hazelnut Press, 1999);
  • Lila Cahoon, "The Cahoons of America and Where to Find Them" (Cardston, Alberta: Lila Cahoon, 1991), p. 385-387;
  • Stephen Lance Calhoun, "From Soldier to Brickmaker: The Life of William Cahoone c1633 to 22 June 1675," published in Orval O. Calhoun, "800 Years of Colquhoun, Colhoun and Cahoon Family History in Ireland, Scotland, England, United States of America, Australia and Canada" (Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1976-1991), vol. 3, p. 22-66;
  • information provided by genealogist Burt Derrick of Harwich, Massachusetts.
  • Source: S165 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Name: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;; NOTEThis information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files.

Foot Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Way, George and Squire, Romily. Collins Scottish Clan & Family Encyclopedia. (Foreword by The Rt Hon. The Earl of Elgin KT, Convenor, The Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs). Published in 1994. Pages 108 - 109.
  2. the official Clan Colquhoun Society
  3. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  4. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  5. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  6. Source: #S165 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=17838154&pid=602176659
  7. Source: #S165 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=17838154&pid=582246872
  8. The descendants of Sir Alexander Colquhoun
  9. The descendants of Sir Alexander Colquhoun
  10. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  11. COHOON - WILLIS and the FAMILIES we came from
  12. COHOON - WILLIS and the FAMILIES we came from
  13. COHOON - WILLIS and the FAMILIES we came from

Profile History

  • Cahoon-44 was created through the import of Lent_Vise_2011-05-11aa.ged on May 26, 2011 by Bryan Sypniewski.
  • Cahoon-44 was adopted Oct 28 2013 - Tom Quick
  • Profile created by Stacey Davis, (firsthand knowledge) was merged into Cahoon-44.
  • Cohoon-33 was created by Deborah Dahl through the import of MarilynTurner.ged on May 10, 2014.
  • Cohoon-33 was merged into Cahoon-44

  • Cohoon-33 was created by Deborah Dahl through the import of MarilynTurner.ged on May 10, 2014.

Biography

Name

Name: William /Cohoon/[14][15][16]
Name: William Sr /Cahoon ♥/[17]
Name: William /Cahoon/[18]

Found multiple versions of NAME. Using William /Cohoon/.

Birth

William Cohoon was born between 1633 and 1634, at Dumbarton,the Village or Shire? Scotland[19][20]

Birth:
Date: 1633
Place: Dumbarton, Scotland[21]
Birth:
Date: 1634
Place: Tullichewan, Scotland
Birth:
Date: 1630
Place: Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire, , Scotland,[22]
Birth:
Date: 1632
Place: Tullichewan, Dunbartonshire, Scotland[23]
Birth:
Date: 1630
Place: Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire, , Scotland,[24]
Birth:
Date: 1632
Place: Tullichewan, Dunbartonshire, Scotland[25]
Birth:
Date: 1633
Place: Dumbarton, Scotland[26]
Birth:
Date: 1634
Place: Tullichewan, Scotland[27]

Found multiple copies of BIRT DATE. Using 1634

Death

William Cohoon died at Age: 42, on 24 JUN 1675, at Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[28][29]
Death: He was a brickmaker
Date: 22 JUN 1675
Place: East Rehoboth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts, USA[30]
Death: He was a brickmaker
Date: 22 JUN 1675
Place: Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[31]
Death: He was a brickmaker
Date: 24 JUN 1675
Place: Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[32]
Death: He was a brickmaker
Date: 22 JUN 1675
Place: East Rehoboth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts, USA[33]
Death: He was a brickmaker
Date: 22 JUN 1675
Place: Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[34]
Death: He was a brickmaker
Date: 24 JUN 1675
Place: Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[35]
Death: Age: 42
Date: 22 JUN 1675
Place: Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[36]

Found multiple copies of DEAT DATE. Using 24 JUN 1675Array

Burial

William Cohoon was buried at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, USA[37][38][39]

Event

Event:
Type: Arrival
Place: Massachusetts[40][41]

Note

Note: #N43

PHOTO

PHOTO @M152@ ???

Object

Object: @M152@
Object: @M499@
Object: @M528@
Object: @M669@
Object: @M776@
Object: @M777@
Object: @M831@
Object: @M835@
Object: @M840@

Marriage

Husband: William Cohoon
Wife: @I681@
Child: Captain John Cohoon
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Marriage:
Date: 26 JUN 1662
Place: Block Island, Newport, Rhode Island, United States[42]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Way, George and Squire, Romily. Collins Scottish Clan & Family Encyclopedia. (Foreword by The Rt Hon. The Earl of Elgin KT, Convenor, The Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs). Published in 1994. Pages 108 - 109.
  2. the official Clan Colquhoun Society
  3. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  4. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  5. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  6. Source: #S165 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=17838154&pid=602176659
  7. Source: #S165 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=17838154&pid=582246872
  8. The descendants of Sir Alexander Colquhoun
  9. The descendants of Sir Alexander Colquhoun
  10. Find A Grave Memorial# 26080818
  11. COHOON - WILLIS and the FAMILIES we came from
  12. COHOON - WILLIS and the FAMILIES we came from
  13. COHOON - WILLIS and the FAMILIES we came from
  14. Source: #S109
  15. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  16. Source: #S94
  17. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  18. Source: #S92
  19. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  20. Source: #S94
  21. Source: #S109
  22. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  23. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  24. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  25. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  26. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  27. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  28. Source: #S109
  29. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  30. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  31. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  32. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  33. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  34. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  35. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  36. Source: #S92
  37. Source: #S109
  38. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  39. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  40. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Nathaniel Cohoon
  41. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  42. Source: #S7 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for William Cohoon
  • Source: S109 Author: Ancestry.com Title: Web: Massachusetts, Find A Grave Index, 1620-2013 Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2012; Repository: #R1
  • Repository: R1 Name: Ancestry.com Address: E-Mail Address: Phone Number:
  • Source: S7 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.; Repository: #R1
  • Source: S92 Author: Edmund West, comp. Title: Family Data Collection - Deaths Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2001.; Repository: #R1
  • Source: S94 Author: Godfrey Memorial Library, comp. Title: American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data - Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genea; Repository: #R1

Notes

Note N43FROM SOLDIER TO BRICK MAKER:
The life of William Cahoone, c. 1633 to 22 June 1675
By - Stephen Lance Calhoun -- 30 June 1987 -- PREFACE
"William Cahoone was most likely the first member of Clan Colquhoun to come to North America. He came as an indentured servant in punishment for his service as a Scottish soldier in the royalist Army of the English Civil War in 1650. The indenture taught William the trade of brick making, which he worked at for the rest of his life. He was killed by Wampanoag Indians in the first day of King Philip's War. His death in 1675 ended what some people would call a tragic life of 42 years, but one that could be called exciting and successful. His seven children and their descendants spread out all over North America, becoming a large and proud Scottish-American family."

Research Notes

Family Tree: William Cahoon (Colquhoun) and Deliverance Peck, Comments By Frederick W. Graham, 2013-03-26 [3]

William Cahoon, my ninth great-grandfather, was a Scot who was sent to New England as an indentured servant in 1651. William was born about 1635, possibly in Luss, a small village in Dunbartonshire on the western shore of Loch Lomond, lands in the western highlands of Scotland that are the ancestral home of Clan Colquhoun.

The events that led to William’s forced relocation to New England had their start with the English civil wars which began in 1642 between the royalist supporters of the Catholic Stuart monarchy and the parliamentarians. By 1650, the Scots had joined the Stuart royalists in rebellion against the English Commonwealth. The Colquhouns, including eighteen-year-old William, joined with thousands of other Scots to fight Oliver Cromwell’s army.

On September 2, 1650, at the town of Dunbar, on southeastern coast of Scotland, the Scots were defeated. Cromwell estimated that three thousand Scots died in battle and ten thousand were taken prisoner. William was among a group of about three thousand prisoners held in Durham cathedral, and was one of the approximately 600 men who survived the imprisonment. In early November of 1650, the first shipments of surviving prisoners were sent as indentured servants to Maine and Massachusetts.

William was shipped out in 1651, indentured to work in the iron works at Braintree (now known as Quincy) and Taunton, Massachusetts. The site of the iron works in Quincy is located on Crescent Street in West Quincy, next to St. Mary’s Church and Hall Cemetery. The Taunton iron works site (in what is now Raynham, about a mile from the Taunton border) is located on Route 104.

In 1661, William, still an indentured servant, was one of the original settlers of Block Island, Rhode Island. After fulfilling the term of his indenture, William Cahoon purchased land on Block Island. William Cahoon was listed as a resident of Block Island who was admitted as a freeman of the Rhode Island Colony in May of 1664 by the Rhode Island General Assembly. William served on a Newport, Rhode Island, grand jury in 1665.

William married Deliverance Peck either on Block Island or in Newport, Rhode Island. The couple’s first four children were born either on Block Island or in Newport. Their fourth child was William, my eighth great-grandfather, born about 1669.

Sometime between December 1669 and February 1670, the Cahoons moved to Swansea, a town in southwestern Massachusetts. William and Deliverance’s last three children were born in Swansea. William was recorded in town records as one of the first signers admitted to the town. At a meeting of the Swansea townsmen on December 24, 1673, William Cahoon was designated the town brick maker. The record, which includes two different spellings of William’s surname, reads:

"At a town meeting of the townsmen, December 24, 1673, it was agreed upon by and between the townsmen in behalf of the town and William Cohoun brickmaker that for and in consideration of a lot and other accommodations or grantes and given him from the town unto him the said William Cohoun. It was therefore agreed and concluded upon by the parties above as that the said William Cahoun shall supply all the inhabitants of the town with bricks at a price not exceeding twenty shillings a thousand in current pay putting between man and man."

William’s brick works was located on the banks of the Palmer River.

Two years later, in 1675, war broke out between the Native Americans and the colonists. Relations between the native inhabitants and English settlers in the colonies had been deteriorating for some years. The war is known in American history as King Philip’s war. William Cahoon was among the first casualties of the war.

While Chief Massasoit of the Wampanoags had tried to maintain friendly relations with the colonists ever since the English colonial settlement in Plymouth in 1621, tensions grew over the succeeding years with the English pushing ever farther onto Indian lands. After Massasoit’s death in 1661, his sons Wamsutta and Metacom (also known as Philip or King Philip) determined to resist further encroachment. Philip was successful in organizing a confederation of his Wampanoags and most other tribes in New England. In June of 1675, three Wampanoags were executed by the English, which enraged the tribe. In retaliation, Indians attacked settlers in Swansea, one of the first incidents in what would come to be known as King Philip’s War.

On June 24, 1675, the residents of Swansea attended religious services. As they returned home they were attacked by Indians; several of the colonists were killed and others seriously wounded. The survivors, including William and Deliverance and their seven children, gathered in the home of Reverend John Miles. The wounded needed medical help. William and another man volunteered to go to the neighboring town of Rehoboth and return with a doctor, and the two men left that evening. Their mutilated bodies were found the next day. William Cahoon died at age forty-two, leaving Deliverance with young children to care for in the midst of war between the colonists and the Indian confederation.

The site of the Miles house, known as the Miles Garrison House, is located at the west end of Miles Bridge in Swansea, just south of the Swansea/Rehoboth line, and just north of where William Cahoon’s residence and brick works would have been located. The bridge crosses the Palmer River. A plaque erected at the site in 1912 lists the names of the eleven colonists who died at Swansea, including the name of “William Cahoone.”

King Philip’s War continued for about a year following the attack at Swansea. The war involved a series of Indian raids on settlements in Connecticut and Massachusetts, followed by retaliatory assaults by colonial militia on Indian villages. The natives prevailed until the spring of 1676, when with the destruction of their crops they faced the prospect of starvation. By the end of the war in August of 1676, when King Philip died, approximately 600 colonists and 3000 natives had perished. More than half of the 90 settlements in the region had been attacked; entire Indian villages were destroyed and tribes decimated. With resistance from the natives broken, English settlers eventually occupied all of southern New England.

William Cahoon experienced war and hardship and opportunity during his forty-two years, as a youth and warrior in Scotland, as a prisoner of war and indentured servant, and as a freeman in Massachusetts, until he met his untimely death in the Indian wars in New England.

A few years after the death of William Cahoon, his widow Deliverance married Caleb Lumbert of Barnstable, Cape Cod, and she and her children moved to Barnstable. Deliverance’s remarriage and relocation to Cape Cod established our Cahoon ancestors’ presence on the Cape through many succeeding generations.


Sources and further information:

Information on William Cahoon from Deborah A. Cahoon Didick, "Famous and Infamous Cahoons" (s.l.: Hazelnut Press, 1999); Lila Cahoon, "The Cahoons of America and Where to Find Them" (Cardston, Alberta: Lila Cahoon, 1991), p. 385-387; Stephen Lance Calhoun, "From Soldier to Brickmaker: The Life of William Cahoone c1633 to 22 June 1675," published in Orval O. Calhoun, "800 Years of Colquhoun, Colhoun and Cahoon Family History in Ireland, Scotland, England, United States of America, Australia and Canada" (Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1976-1991), vol. 3, p. 22-66; and from information provided by genealogist Burt Derrick of Harwich, Massachusetts.




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On February 21, 2015 at 16:17GMT Deborah Dahl wrote:

Cohoon-33 and Cahoon-44 appear to represent the same person because: Many life events appear to be the same.



C  >  Cahoon  >  William Cahoon