Geoffrey Clements II

Geoffrey Clements II

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Sir Geoffrey "Lord Mayor of London" Clements II
Born in Devonshire, Oxfordshire, Englandmap
Brother of
Husband of — married in London, Englandmap
Died in Devonshire, Oxfordshire, Englandmap
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Contents

Biography

This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

Name

Name: Sir Geoffrey Ii, Lord Mayor of London /CLEMENTS/[1][2][3][4]
Name: Sir Geoffrey Ii Lord Mayor of /CLEMENTS/[5]

Found multiple versions of NAME. Using Sir Geoffrey Ii, Lord Mayor of London /CLEMENTS/.

Birth

Birth:
Date: 1570
Place: Devonshire, Oxfordshire, England[6][7][8][9][10]

Death

Death:
Date: 1609
Place: Devonshire, Oxfordshire, England[11][12][13][14][15]

Event

Event:
Type: Arrival
Date: 1617
Place: Virginia[16][17][18]

Occupation

Occupation: shop of wools and linens
Date: 1590
Place: London, London, England[19]

Note

Note: #N46

Marriage

Husband: Sir Geoffrey Ii, Lord Mayor of London Clements
Wife: Lady Elizabeth Ann Fuller
Child: Jeremiah Clements
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Marriage:
Date: 1590
Place: London, England[20]

Sources

  • WikiTree profile Clements-671 created through the import of Ancestor's that we lost, the Decendants they left behind_2011-08-28_01 (2).ged on Sep 12, 2011 by Willette Bryant. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Willette and others.
  • Source: S1 Author: Ancestry.com Title: Public Member Trees Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006; Repository: #R1
  • Repository: R1 Name: www.ancestry.com Address: E-Mail Address: Phone Number:

Notes

Note N46Clement history
CLEMENT FAMILY HISTORY
Jeffrey Clement married Elizabeth Fuller in London, 1590. They had five children. Third son, Jeremiah, was born 1607. Jeffrey died in 1609 and his widow and four small children came to America on the good ship "George", landing at Jamestown, Virginia, June 10,1611. She married again in 1621, Colonel Ralph Hamor. (Taken from the very interesting magazine, Genealogy, edited by Wm. Montgomery Clements.Re:1, p.306. Re:2, p. 293 and Re: 13)
It is thought that Jeffrey Clement was a merchant with interest in theVirginia Trading Company. His widow may have come to America because of this interest.
"The first of the name in America is said to have been Elizabeth Clement (nee Fuller) the widow of one Jeffrey of London, England, who came withher three small children to America in 1611 and settled at Jamestown, Virginia. The children were Jeremiah, Nicholas, and Elizabeth. Jeremiah wasprobably the father, by his wife, Edy, of John, Ezekiel, Amy and Francis.This Francis was the father, by his wife, Elizabeth Meriweather, of Francis, Benjamin, Thomas, Mary and Elizabeth"; (Re: 8)
2.
Elizabeth Clement
Widow of Jeffrey Clement of London, married Jeffrey in London,1590, bore him five children (name of first two not given), among them being Jeremiah, born 1607, Nicholas and Elizabeth. Widowed in 1609,andleft with four children (this indicated that one died), she came toAmerica on the ship "George", landing at Jamestown in 1611. She married again,1621, Colonel Ralph Hamor.
Elizabeth Clement came to Jamestown in 1611, bringing with her four small children and two servants. A woman of gentile birth and breeding,the niece of Nicholas Fuller and Lady Elizabeth Layghton. (Taken from magazine Genealogy edited by Em. Montgomery Clements. Re:1, 2 & 5, p. 41, 7 p.378 and Re: 13).
3.
Jeremiah Clement
Jeremiah Clement, born in 1607 in London, England to Jeffrey and Elizabeth, came to America with his widowed mother, landing at Jamestown, 1611. He is ancestor of Samuel L. Clements, know to the world asMark Twain. He married Edy _____ in James City in 1634. Hisson, Francis, was born in Surry County; was the father of Francis Clementwho married Elizabeth Merriweather, (Magazine, Genealogy)
Jeremiah was probably father of John, Ezekiel, Amy, as well as Francis. (Re; 8)
The records in James City county have been destroyed, but in the Land Office in Richmond, in Patent Book 3 p, 274, dated 1636, Jeremiah Clement is granted 500 acres eastward of land formerly in his possession, on thenorth side of James River for the transportation of nine persons, one of whom is given as Edy, wife of Jeremiah Clement.
In Land Patent Book, Vol. 2, p. 306, we find granted unto Jeremiah Clement, son and heir of Mrs. Elizabeth Clement, deceased, 350 acres on the eastside of Upper Chippook Creek, August 26, 1633. Upper Chippook Creek line lies in what became Surry County in 1652.
Jeremiah Clement represented James City County in the House of Burgesses in 1641. He probably died before Surry was made a county..
In Surry Deed, March 17, 1657, Captain Henry Perry, who had married the "heretrix" of Jeremiah Clement of Upper Chippook Creek, conveys 350acres to Edward Oliver..
In 1667 John Clement (no 6 on the chart) owned 350 acres in Surry County. (This could have been the same 350 acres granted Jeremiah, his father.)
4.
Francis Clement
Son of Jeremiah Clement (Re: 3) states that he was the fourth son. Some authorities claim that Francis was an original immigrant. (Re: 1) married Elizabeth Merriweather. He died 1721.She bore him five children, Francis, Jr., Benjamin, Thomas, Mary and Elizabeth. (Re: 8)
In his will is mention of a son Benjamin. This Benjamin was one of the founders of Lynchburg, Virginia. He married Susannah Hill in 1731 (1727). His will, filed in the records of Campbell County, Virginia, mentions Adam, born 1739. This Adam was a farmer in Bedford County where he married Agnes Johnson, January 27, 1765. (See pages16,Vol. II, Genealogy.)
In Book 7, p. 703, Land Patent Records, Richmond, Virginia, there is granted to Francis Clement, year 1689, 450 acres of land, due for the transportation of nine persons into the colony, and the list is headed with his own name, showing him to be an immigrant (Re: 2, p. 293). He represented Surry County in the House of Burgesses in 1692 (General House of Burgesses). He served as clerk of the General Assembly, 1699 (Journal of H. B.). He was clerk of Surry County from October 1697 to July 1708. (Surry Records) and his signature reads "Fra Clement". Francis Clement married first, Elizabeth Merriweather, a sister of William and Major Nicholas Merriweather (Surry Records, Deed Book 4, p. 46); second, Lydia (?) (probably Blighton), for at Surry Court, held August 11, 1711, Francis Clement and his wife, Lydia, administer the estate of George Blighton.
Prior to 1715, Francis Clement, senior, moved over into Isle of Wight County, for in that year he deeds, for love and affection, 516 acres toson, Francis Clement, Junior, and states: "I, Fra Clement, of Isle of Wight, do appoint loving friend, Nicholas Moggett of Surry, to be my true and lawful attorney to acknowledge the deed, etc."
The deed of Francis Clement, Sr., is recorded in Isle of Wight, 1719, in Vol. 2, p. 632 of wills and deeds. He bequeaths to son, Francis Clement " My plantation, commonly called the Springs, where the said Francis now dwells, containing 616 acres. My silver tankard (obliterated). To son, Thomas, 450 acres, a gun called Harrison, etc. To son Benjamin, my plantation on the north side of Nottaway River and 450 acres adjoining, daughters Mary and Elizabeth, wife Lydia, sole executor. To friend Cap. Nathaniel Riley, my silver sword, and to his wife, a morning ring." Slaves, Sam and Nannie. he sets free as a reward for faithful services, giving each 50 acres and a cow.
___________________________________
CLEMENT FAMILY HISTORY
Jeffrey Clement married Elizabeth Fuller in London, 1590. She was a woman of gentile birth and breeding, the niece of
Nicholas Fuller and Lady Elizabeth Layghton. They had five children. Jeffrey died in1609 so his widow and four children
came to America on the good ship "George", landing at Jamestown, Virginia, June 10, 1611. (Ref., Genealogy, edited by
William Montgomery Clements. Re: 1, 2 and 5, p. 41, 7, p. 378 and Re: 13.) In 1621, Elizabeth, widow of Jeffrey, married
Colonel Ralph Hamor.
Jeremiah Clement, born in 1607, in London England, to Jeffrey and Elizabeth Clement is the ancestor of Samuel L.Clements,
known to the world as Mark Twain. Jeremiah married Edy _____ in James City County in 1634. His son, Francis, was born
in Surry County, Virginia, and later married Elizabeth Meriweather.
The records in James City County have been destroyed, but in the Land Office in Richmond, in Patent Book 3, p. 274, dated
1636, Jeremiah Clement is granted 500 acres eastward of land formerly in his possession, on the north side of James River, for
the transportation of nine persons, one of whom is given as Edy, wife of Jeremiah Clement.
In Land Patent Book, Vol. 2, p. 306, we find granted unto Jeremiah Clement, son and heir of Mrs. Elizabeth Clement,
deceased, 350 acres on the east side of Upper Chippook Creek, August 26, 1633. Upper Chippook Creek lies in what
became Surry County in 1652.
Jeremiah Clement represented James City County in the House of Burgesses in 1641. He probably died before Surry was
made a county.
In Surry deed, March 17, 1657, Captain Perry, who had married the "heretrix" of Jeremiah Clement of Upper Chippooke
Creek, conveyed 350 acres to Edward Oliver.
In 1667 John Clement owned 350 acres in Surry County. This probably was the same 350 acres granted Jeremiah, his father.
John Clement, son of Jeremiah and Edy _____, was born in16__, and married Mary _____. She bore him five children,
Samuel, William (no 11 on chart), John, Anne and Elizabeth.
In 1687 John Clement served as ensign in the Surry Militia. In 1704 he owned 387 acres in Surry County. Will, dated May
2, 1710, names children Samuel, John, Anne, Elizabeth and wife Mary. (Re:2) For some reason there is no mention of son,
William (no 11 on chart), in his will. However, Samuel (no 10 on chart) and John (no 12 on chart) both mention their brother,
William (no 11 0n chart), in their wills.
Francis Clement, son of Jeremiah states that he was the fourth son. Some authorities claim that Francis was an original
immigrant. (Re: 1) married Elizabeth Merriweather, sister of William and Major Nicholas Merriweather (Surry Records Deed
Book 4, p. 46) married second, Lydia Blighton, for at Surry Court, held August 11, 1711, Francis Clement and wife, Lydia,
administer the estate of George Blighton. He represented Surry County in the House of Burgesses in 1692. He served as
Clerk of the General Assembly, 1699. (Journal of H. B.) He was Clerk of Surry County from October 1697 to July 1708.
(Surry Records) and his signature reads, "Fra Clement".
Prior to 1715, Francis Clement, senior, moved into Isle of Wight County, for in that year he deeds, for love and affection, 516
acres to son, Francis Clement, Jr., and states: "I Fra Clement of Isle of Wight, appoint loving friend, Nicholas Moggett of
Surry, to be my true and lawful attorney to acknowledge the deed, etc.".
The deed of Francis Clement, Sr., is recorded in Isle of Wight, 1719, in Vol. 2, p. 632 of wills and deeds. He bequeaths to
son Francis Clement, "my plantation, commonly known as the Springs, where the said Francis now dwells, containing 616
acres. My silver tankard (obliterated). To son, Thomas, 450 acres, a gun called Harrison, etc. To son, Benjamin, my
plantation on the North side of Nottaway River and 450 acres adjoining, daughters Mary and Elizabeth. Wife Elizabeth, sole
executor. To friend Cap. Nathaniel Riley my silver sword and to his wife, a mourning ring". Slaves Sam and Nannie he sets
free as a reward for faithful services, giving each 50 acres and a cow.
Lydia Vaughn was widow of George Clayton Blighton. By Francis Clement they had 1. Francis Clement, Jr who made a will
8 April 1721; recorded 21 June 1721, Surry Co., Va.; 2. Benjamin Clements married Judith Parker; 3. Thomas Clements; 4.
Mary Clements; 5. Elizabeth Clements married 2ndly Ambrose Dudley. She married 1st James Camp (Kemp) by whom she
had Lucy Camp who married Rev. Samuel Harris of Halifax County, Virginia. Rev. Samuel Harris was born 12 January 1724
in Hanover Co, Va. Elizabeth, nee Clements, (Camp) Dudley's will in Prince George County, Virginia Records 1728-64-NO.
69. 1993; found in loose papers in Prince GeorgeCounty; dated 11 November 1762; proved February Court 1763; recorded
9 January1764; names her son-in-law Samuel Harris, her sole executor. Virginia Baptist Historical Library; The Virginia Baptist
Register Vol. 10, p. 435 through 466; Vol. 11, p. 498 thru 518, Halifax County, Va; Ct. Rec. Bk. 1, p. 6, Bk. 2, pp. 123,
188; Pittsylvania Co., Bk 6, p. 68; Bk 9, pg. 213; Bk 11, pg. 222.
____________________________________________
CLEMENT FAMILY HISTORY
The Camp (Kemp) intermarried into the Harris Family. The Rev. Samuel Harris married Lucy Camp, daughter of Elizabeth
Clements, the wife of James Camp whose second husband was Ambrose Dudley. Elizabeth was the sister of Benjamin
Clements who, in her will, says that he is of Southampton County, Virginia, and that he is her brother. Her father was Captain
Francis Clement of the Surry County Virginia Militia, 1692; Burgess of Surry County, Virginia, 1692-1693; Clerk of the
Assembly of Virginia, 1697-1708 (Ref.: Adventures of Purse and Person, pp. 138-140, 2nd Edition, 1964, compiled and
edited by Annie L. Jester and Martha W. Hiden F.A.S.G.) Francis Clement's Will is dated November 22, 1717, Isle of Wight
County, Virginia (Ref.: Isle of Wight Records, Vol. 2, 1661-1719, Reel 23, pp. 632, 633, Archives Division, Virginia State
Library, Richmond, Virginia). Francis Clement was first married to Elizabeth Meriwether by whom he had Francis Clement,
Jr. Francis Clement, Sr., was married second to Lydia, nee Vaughan, widow of George Blayton by whom he had the said
Benjamin Clement and Elizabeth Clement who married first, James Camp and second, Ambrose Dudley. Elizabeth (Clement)
Camp Dudley's will is on file in Prince George County, dated November 11,1762, proved February Court, 1763; not
recorded until January 9, 1764, in Prince George County, Virginia. (Records, 1728-1764, No.69-1993). In her will she
states her daughter, Lucy Camp is married to Samuel Harris, whom she designates as her sole Executor. (Ref: TheVirginia
Baptist Register, Vol. 10, pp. 467-471; Vol. 11, 1972, pp. 523-526).
"Samuel Harris himself told Morgan Edwards (early Baptist historian) in 1772, that he was born in Hanover County (Virginia)
near the Pamunkey River, or as Edwards wrote, "near Pomonky", (Edwards, op.cit., Furman Manuscripts, pp. 57-58. Ref:
The VirginiaBaptist Register, Vol. 11, 1972, p. 509.)
"Samuel Harris was born January 12, 1724, in the County of Hanover, Virginia." (Virginia Baptist Ministers by James B.
Taylor with an Introduction by J. B. Jeter, DD, in two series; Series I, p. 34, Sheldon & Co., 115 Nassau Street, N. Y., 1860;
Congressional Library, Washington, DC, Box 6248, V8T3, Series 142, 1860.)
"For instance, in his sketch of Samuel Harris, Morgan Edwards (p. 520, 521), shortly after May 2, 1772, visited Col. Samuel
Harris of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He is the only one who informs us that Samuel Harris married Lucy Camp." (Ref:
Virginia Baptist Register, Vol. 11, 1972, p. 523.)
This marriage has been proved by the research of Dr. Woodford B. Hackley.
_______________________________________
Ref: The Virginia Baptist Register, Vol. 10, p. 459: Richard Jones chosen to officiate in 1751 by the Cumberland (then
Halifax) Parish as reader at Fork Church in conjunction with Rev. Samuel Harris.
Vol. 11, p. 491: Rev. Wm. Washington baptized by Elder Richard Jones, 1745. William Washington was great grandson of
John Washington, and a grandson of Richard Washington, who married the niece of Col. John Jordan, long time Burgess from
Surry County, Virginia.
The above George Clements of Prince George County, Virginia, was son of Thomas Clements and grandson of Benjamin
Clements, whose daughter, Elizabeth Clements, by her first marriage to James Camp, was mother of Lucy Camp, wife of Rev.
Samuel Harris. Said Benjamin Clements married Judith Parker, daughter of Richard Parker. Benjamin's will, 3 April 1744,
Surry County, Virginia. Said Richard Parker, on 18 May 1692 conveyed to Richard Washington, for 2000 £ of tobacco for
80 acres lying on Blackwater & c witnessed by Elizabeth and Francis Clements.
______________________________________
Prince George County Records, 29 September 1733: William Wilson of Henrico County, Virginia, to Lydia Clements for 5 £,
100 acre plantation called "Goodwins", on Ward's Creek and one other plantation where said Lydia Clements now dwells in
Martin Brandon Parish.
Witnesses: Wm. Averill, John Mingo, Benjamin Clements, Matthew Whitfield, James Pries, James Clement. Recorded 9
October 1733.
______________________________
Loose Papers - Prince George County, Virginia Records - Deed, 9 October 1733, William Wilson to Lydia Clements 100
acres on Wards Creek
Prince George County, Virginia, Minute Book 1737-1740, Page 369: On 11 December 1739 a deed and release was made to
John Smith, Jr., from Richard Ogilby & Lydia Clements, his wife; Peter Robins & Mary, his wife; and James Camp and wife,
Elizabeth Clements. Benjamin Clements was brother of Elizabeth Clements, who was wife of James Camp and mother of Lucy
Camp, wife of Rev.Samuel Harris.
Benjamin Clements of South Hampton County, Virginia, and Lucy Camp Harris were children of Francis Clement of Surry
County. Elizabeth Cements second husband was Ambrose Dudley, Hanover County, Virginia. Capt. Francis Clements first
wife was Elizabeth Meriwether, daughter of Nicholas Meriwether
______________________________
Jeremiah Clements married 1577, Agnes Webster in County Hunts, England. (Parish Records of Chesterton Parish,
Huntingshire). His son, Jeffrey Clements, died in 1609 at Oxford, England; shareholder in the London Virginia Company,
which colonized Jamestown, Virginia. He married Lady Elizabeth Fuller, daughter of Sir Cuthbert, whose brother Nicholas
Fuller, Esq., in his will, 1620, in England says: Elizabeth Clements, daughter of my brother, Cuthbert Fuller, her late husband,
Jeffrey Clement, and her son, Nicholas Clement ... stock in the Company of Virginia ...son, Sir Nicholas Fuller, 1620. (From
wills, abstracts, Folio 26, P.C.G.at Somerset House, London). Same Folio, p. 180, will of "John Clement (batchelor)" (brother
to Jeffrey Clement) says: Father, Wm. Evans and mother, Margaret Evans (meaning step-father) money---money which I have
in the ship "George", and Clement's daughter. Prob. 17 May 1620. After her husband, Jeffrey Clement died in 1609, Mrs.
Elizabeth (Fuller) Clements, with her sons, Jeremiah, Nicholas, and Ezechaiil, and daughter Elizabeth and two white servants,
Jefferis Hull and Dorothy Greene, came to James Citie in 1611 in the ship "George," to take up her shares in the London
Virginia Company. They lived through the Indian Massacre of 1622 at James Citie, and she married second, 1623/24, Capt.
Ralph Homer, Secretary of the Colony. After her death, Gov. Harvey granted to her eldest son: Jeremiah Clements, 350 acres
at Upper Cheppoakes Creek, Surry County, Virginia, 16 August 1633 (Virginia Land Patents Book No. 1, p.118). He was a
member of the Assembly for James Citie, January 12, 1641 (The Virginia Colonial Register, W. G. and Mary N. Stanard,
page 61, Surry County, Virginia; Magazine of History and Biology, Vol. 9, p. 51, Burgess). 9 May1636, Samuel Edmunds
patented land at the mouth of Upper Chippoakes Creek, adjoining the lands of Jeremiah Clements, (Virginia Land Patent Book
No 1, p. 349). Harrisons Land was on the other side of Clements grant. See: Adventurers of Purse & Person (Order F.F.F.
Virginia, A. L. Jester, pp. 138-140, 2nd Edition.)
Captain John Clements, born 1631, of Surry County, Virginia, was Commander-in-Chief for Bacon in Bacon's Rebellion. He
testified to the boundaries of Thomas Rolph's property re: King Powahatan's gift to his daughter, Pocahontas, who married
John Rolph, etc. His son:
Captain Francis Clements, clerk of Surry County, Virginia, 1697-1708, member of the House of Burgesses, assembled 2
March 1692-93, Surry County, Virginia (Virginia Colonial Register, p. 88; W .G. & Mary N. Stanard); and clerk of the
Assembly, 1699. He was granted by Gov.Ed. Knott, 2 May 1706, 1000 acres on Great Blackwater Swamp and granted by
Gov. Alexander Spottswood, 16 June 1714, 516 acres on South side of the Nottoway River, and on Spring Swamp, Surry
County, Virginia (Virginia Land Patent Book 9, p. 725 and Book. 10, p. 184). Soon after this he removed from Surry County,
Virginia, to that part of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, which in 1748 became Southampton County, Virginia. His plantation
was near that tract of land reserved for the remnant of the Nottoway Indians. He married first, Elizabeth, nee Meriwether. He
married second Lydia, nee Vaughan, by whom he had Francis Clements.
_____________________________________________
Clement * Clements * Clemens
Complete records of this family have never been completed due to the destruction of the court records of Eastern Virginia
Counties. TheVirginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 32, published in 1924 states that the founder of the family
came to Virginia in 1611. She was Mrs.Elizabeth Clemens a woman of "gentle birth", a niece of Sir Nicholas Fuller and Lady
Elizabeth Layghton. She brought with her, three sons and a daughter. In Land Patent Book, Vol. II, page 306, in Surry
County, Jeremiah Clements, son of Mrs. Elizabeth Clements, deceased, is mentioned. In various old Virginia records Jeremiah,
Bartholamew, and Francis, Sr., are mentioned but these genealogical records are vague. No positive direct lineage is provable
until we see William Clements of King William County (Land Patent Book 17, page 164, Richmond) being granted 1227 acres
in Amelia County on the Appomattox River and Bent Run in the year 1736. This William Clement served as one of the
presiding judges of the Court of Amelia from1741-1755, when he was appointed sheriff (Amelia County Records). He died in
1760 and his will, probated in February of that year, named sons Benjamin, John, William, Francis, and daughters, Elizabeth,
Ann, and Barsheba.
Benjamin1 Clement, to whom an accurate tracing can be made, was the son of William Clement of King William County.
William's father is unknown, also his wife.
William Clement of King William County patented 1225 acres in Amelia County on the Appomattox River in 1736 (5) and
moved to that county. His will lists children: Benjamin, William, John, Francis, Elizabeth Ford Ellyson, Ann Major and
Barsheba Major.
In 1741, Benjamin Clement, son of William, of Amelia County patented land on Staunton River, Pittyslvania County. About
1725 he married Susanna Hill of King and Queen County. In 1748 he moved his family to Pittsylvania County, then
Lunenburg, and built his home, "Clement Hill". 2
1. & 2: History of Pittsylvania County, Maude Carter Clement, p. 145.
Benjamin Clement and William Lawton were Captains of Companies of Rangers for Halifax for defense against the Indians in
the French and Indian Wars, 1755.1
"Sometime ago, my having made powder was mentioned in your paper, but as I wish for no more merit (should there be any in
it) than I deserve, I inform the public that Mr. Benjamin Clement is a partner with me in making powder, and that he was the
first in the colony that I know of who attempted to make it, altho' he did not bring it to perfection. Since our partnership, we
have brought it to such perfection with salt-petre of our own making that the best riflemen approve of it; and with the little mill
that we have we can make fifty pound weight a day. Salt-petre, only, is wanting, which may very easily be made by observing
the following directions; and when it is considered how much we want powder and that salt-petre is the principal ingredient, it is
hopeful that those who have the good of their country at heart will exert themselves in making it. Without it we can have no
powder, consequently, no means of defense; but with it we shall soon have both. I am, Sir, your very humble servant,
Charles Lynch
August 5, 1775"2
The directions for making the salt-petre were to dig up the dirt floor of old meat houses - boil the dirt and strain through straw.
Benjamin Clement was now 75 years old. He died in 1780 and is buried at the foot of "Clement Hill". His estate was valued at
£27,664.4.8. Charles Clement, son of Adam and Agnes, inherited "Clement Hill". It passed to the Hurts through the marriage
of John L. Hurt to Nannie Clement, granddaughter of Charles, Sr., and daughter of Charles, Jr. and wife Lucy Hunt.3
1, 2, & 3: From Maude Clement's History of Pittsylvania County, pp. 67, 144 & 145.
Benjamin Clement's (great-great- grandfather of MarkTwain) will names his wife Susanna and children: (Will Book 2, p.115).
Sons, Adam & Isaac named Executors (Account Book I, p.86).
1. Stephen
2. Isaac - married Anne Denham of Wales. She was born 18 July 1772 and died 23 December 1856 (Records Clement
Bible). He commanded a company of Pittsylvania Militia in the Revolutionary War.(Virginia Magazine of History, Vol. 20, p.
205). Prior to that, he was a member of the County Committee on Safety. On pages 167 and 168 of Maude Carter
Clement's Historyof Pittsylvania County, she relates that the May 4, 1780, Act of the General Assembly ordered 2500
infantry men to go to the aid of South Carolina. Ninety-seven men under Capt. Isaac Clement and Lt. Benjamin Duncan went
from Pittsylvania County. At Hillsboro, N.C., they joined the 3rd Virginia Regiment under Maj. Henry Conway in Gen.
Edward Stevens' Brigade. They marched South at night until they came to Gen. Gates' forces in front of Cornwallis at
Rudgely's Mill. Mrs. Clement states that Gen. " Light Horse" Harry Lee blamed Gates for their defeat at Camden because the
troops were untrained for battle. As they retreated northward, Capt. Isaac Clement's Company of Pittsylvania Militia and
otherVirginia troops camped for the night at the edge of a frog-infested swamp. The exhausted men slept soundly until they
were awakened by a terrifyingly deafening noise. Capt.Isaac later told it many times, with great delight, that his brother Adam,
Captain of the Bedford Militia, also camped there, upon being awakened and thinking the frog noise came from Col. Tarleton's
troops, leaped to his feet, drew his sword and cried, "Gentlemen, I surrender." The children of Capt. Isaac and Ann Denham
Clement were: Hugh, Isaac, Jr.and Stephen. Capt. Issac and his sons, Hugh and Isaac, Jr. moved to Pendleton District, S.C.
where he died 23 December 1856. (Clement FamilyBible)
3. Adam, one of the founders of Lynchburg, and great grandfather of Mark Twain, married Agnes Johnson of
Louisa County, Virginia. Agnes' ancestry can be traced back to Scotland through the Johnson and the Clark
families. Adam was Sheriff of Campbell County 1784, 1792, and 1805 and also commanded a company
of Bedford Militia as related in the comments concerning his brother Isaac. He was also the great grandfather
of Mark Twain. The children of Adam and Agnes Johnson Clement are listed in the Douglas Summers
Brown's Lynchburg's Pioneer Quakers. They are:
1.
2..Adam, Jr. - War of 1812 (CC Chronicle p. 379).
3. Alexander - Served as Commonwealth Attorney, Campbell County from 1825 until he moved to Tennessee.
4. Samuel - married Pamela Goggin and had (a) John Marshall Clemens married Jane Lampton; moved to
Florida and then to Missouri. At Mt. Olive Cemetery is Flat Stone on which is lettered, "Passed on, John M.
Clemens, born in Campbell County, Virginia, August 11, 1798; died in Hannibal, Missouri, March 14, 1847".
Among their children:(a) Mark Twain
5. William Johnson
6. Benjamin
7. George Washington (Dr.) of "Turkey Cock" married Sarah Turner. He died 1867. Their son Henry C.
Clement, Sr.,married Harriet Morrison who had:
(1) Col. Harry C. Clement, Jr., married Jane Rose of Indiana
(2) Caroline
(3) Bushrod Morrison married Margaret Lee of S.C.
(4) Mary Royall
(5) Nathaniel Elliott married Maude Carter, daughter of James & Nannie Pigg
Carter on June 24, 1902.
(6) James Turner - Judge of 7th Judicial Court.
(7) Stephen Preston - Tobacconist of China. Married Margaret Clary.
(8) Samuel A. (U.S. Navy) married Agnes Taliaferro
Ref: History of Pittsylvania County
Children of Benjamin and Susanna Clement (continued):
4. James married Kate who was the second wife of Dr. John Cabell.
5. Benjamin
6. John
7. Rachel married Captain Joshua Abston
8. Elizabeth married Isaac Butterworth
9. Susanna married William Evans
Stephen Clement, son of Isaac and Annie Denham Clement was born 18 July 1772. He married Susanna Palmer, daughter of
Jeffrey Palmer of Halifax County, Virginia. She was born 14 January 1799 and died 26 September 1850. When his father
and his brothers moved to Pendleton District, S. C., about 1798, he remained and inherited his father's estate,"Cherry Grove,"
near Straightstone. His will, proved in 1856, names, among other children, Anne Denham Clement, wife of Rawley Thompson.
(Clement Bible and History of Pittsylvania County, p. 140.)
Stephen Clement and Susanna Palmer Clement's children are:
1. Abraham, born 12 October 1800; married September 1829, Martha G.Callaway. Abraham died 17 January
1863. Martha died 1881.
2. Annie Denham, born 17 September 1802; married 24 January 1827, Raleigh (Rawley) Stott Thompson.
3. Rachel S., born 13 July 1809; married 14 April 1836, Benjamin Clements. (They were cousins.) They reared
Mary Ann Susan Anderson, daughter of her sister Elizabeth G. Clement Anderson and John Robert Anderson.
Although they did not adopt her, she inherited their property in Campbell County near Rustburg. Rachel and
Benjamin moved to Campbell County around 1838. They had the "Brick House" built of brick made on the
place. Mary Ann Susan Anderson married Samuel James Thompson. At her death her property was willed to
her children. (See Thompson, Anderson)
4.. Elizabeth G., born 9 Oct. 1811, married John Robert Anderson 19 March1833, She died 16 August 1874.
The Clement line joins the Thompson line when Anne Denham became the second wife of Raleigh Stott Thompson.
The Clement line joins the Anderson line with the marriage of Elizabeth G. to John Robert Anderson.
The Anderson line joins the Thompson line with the marriages of the following Anderson children of Thomas and Polly Haley
Anderson to the Thompson children of George Washington Thompson:
Banister Anderson to Elizabeth Thompson
Jane Anderson to Raleigh (Rawley) Stott Thompson
Churchill Anderson to Rebecca Thompson
Annie Denham Clement, daughter of Stephen and Susanna Palmer Clement, became the second wife of Raleigh Stott
Thompson on 24 January 1827. (Raleigh had previously married Jane Anderson, daughter of Thomas and Polly Haley
Anderson.) Their son Samuel James Thompson married Mary Ann Susan Anderson, daughter of John Robert Anderson and
Elizabeth Clement (daughter of Stephen Clement and Susanna Palmer).
______________________________
Children of Samuel James Thompson (1831-1891) and Mary Ann Susan Anderson Thompson (1840-1919) were:
Raleigh Stott Thompson m. Hessie Barricks
Samuel Anderson Thompson m. Mary ElizabethAnderson
George W. Thompson unmarried
Annie D. Thompson unmarried
Emma Thompson m. Richard C. Tweedy
Rachel B. Thompson m. Crawford Tweedy (Uncle of Richard)
John Robert Thompson m. Pink Blair
Benjamin Clement Thompson m. Elizabeth Mae Tweedy (sister of Richard)
Children of Samuel Anderson Thompson and Mary Elizabeth Anderson Thompson:
Two infants - died in infancy
Joseph Steven Thompson m. Mildred Coleman
Samuel James Thompson m. Martha Laura Watkins
Children of Samuel James Thompson and Martha Laura Watkins Thompson:
Elizabeth Watkins Thompson
Samuel James Thompson, Jr.
Stephen Leo Thompson
Robert Anderson Thompson
____________________________________________
Relationship of Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) to Clement, Anderson and Thompson
William Clement1
Benjamin Clement
Isaac Clement3 Brothers Adam Clement3
Stephen Clement4 First cousins Samuel Clement4
Annie Denham Clement5 Elizabeth G. Clement5 John Marshall Clemens5
m. Raleigh Thompson m. John M. Anderson
Samuel James Thompson6 Stephen Thos.Anderson 6 Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens6
Samuel Anderson Thompson7 Mary E. Anderson 7
Samuel James Thompson8 Samuel James Thompson8
Samuel James Thompson, Jr.9
Samuel James Thompson, III10
____________________________________________
FULLER FAMILY HISTORY
Elizabeth Fuller, daughter of Sir Cuthbert Fuller, married first, Sir Jeffrey Clements of London, England, in 1590. He died in
1609 so in 1623 she married secondly, Col. Ralph Homor, who succeeded James Rolfe as Secretary of the London-Virginia
Company.
Her son, Capt. Francis Clements, was Captain of the Surry County, Virginia Militia and her grandson, Capt. John Clements
(son of Jeremiah), born 1631, was a Commander-in-Chief during Bacon's Rebellion.
Her husband, Capt. Ralph Homor, returned to England and published in1615, a "True Discourse of the Present State of
Virginia", returned toVirginia as Vice Admiral of Argall. At his death he left most of his Virginia property to his stepson,
Jeremiah Clements as shown by records.
They were all in the second Indian Massacre at Jamestown in 1622.
After the death of Elizabeth Homor, Gov. Harvey granted to her eldest son, Jeremiah Clements, 350 acres at Upper
Chippoakes Creek, Surry County, Virginia, 16 August 1657. (Land Patents Book 1, p. 115) He was a member of the
Assembly for James Citie, January 12, 1641 (Virginia Historical Magazine, Vol. 9, p. 51, Burgess).
His son, Capt. John Clement, born 16_1, of Surry County was Commander-in-Chief during Bacon's Rebellion, and in the old
records are given the boundaries of the Thomas Rolph property, and it spoke of how King Powhatan had given the land to his
daughter, Pocahontas, who married John Rolph, etc.
Mrs. Jeffrey Clements, nee Lady Elizabeth Fuller, following the death of her husband at Oxford, England, went to Jamestown,
Virginia, in 1611, taking with her her sons Jeremiah, Nicholas, Ezechaill and her daughter together with two white servants.
Upon the death of John Clement, her husband, Jeffrey Clement's bachelor brother, she was left by him stock in the Virginia
Company and money he had invested in the ship "The George". They lived through the Indian Massacre of 1622 at James
Citie, and she married 2nd 1621, Ralph Hamor, Secretary of the Colony.
After her death, Gov. Harvey, granted to her eldest son, Jeremiah Clements, 350 acres at Upper Chippoakes Creek, Surry
County, Virginia, 16 August 1657. (Land Patents 1, p. 116) Jeremiah was member of the Assembly for James Citie, Jan. 12,
1641. (Virginia Historical Magazine, Vol. 9, p 51, Burgess.)
Capt. John Clement, born 16_1, of Surry County was Commander-in-Chief during Bacon's Rebellion, and last Spring, at Old
Surry County Court House, was found an ancient record, in which he testified to the boundaries of the Thomas Rolph property,
and it spoke of how King Powhatan had given the land to his daughter, Pocahontas, who married John Rolph.
Capt. Francis Clement was Clerk of Surry County 3 February 1697-1708, Member of the House of Burgesses 1693, and
Clerk of the Assembly 1699. He married first, Elizabeth Merriwether, daughter of Nicholas. Francis married secondly, 4 May
1703, Lydia, widow of Bleighton, supposed to have been a Vaughn. On 2 May 1706, Gov. Edd Knott granted to Capt.
Francis Clements, 1000 acres land on Great Blackwater Swamp, and 15 June 1714, Gov. Alexander Spotswood granted unto
Captain Francis Clements, 516 acres on the south side of the Nottoway River and on Spring Swamp, Surry County. (Land
Patents 9, p.725, and 10, p. 184)
____________________________________
Note: p. 138-139, Adventures of Purse & Person - Nicholas Clement (brother of Jeremiah Clement) was paid 1600 pounds
of tobacco by Lt. Waters as due him out of the estate of Capt. Wilcockes.
Note: Historical Southern Families, Vol. 5, p. 128 - William Overton, born 13 December 1638 in England, married
Elizabeth Waters; parents of Temperance Overton, born 2 March 1679, died 19 February 1716, "Cedar Hill," Hanover
County, Virginia. She married William Harris, born 1699, died before 1733 a cousin of Thomas Harris, whose will is dated
1729, Henrico County, Virginia. He is said to have been a relative of Rev.(William) Samuel Harris, born 12 January 1724 in
Hanover County, Virginia, and died in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, 1799; married Lucy Camp, daughter of James Camp and
Elizabeth Clements, sister of Benjamin Clements of Southampton County, Virginia. (Ref. Harris Records, p 19, by Mrs. Cecil
T. Hays (Mary) Calloway Hays, 1953.)
The Rev. Wm.(?) Samuel Harris married Lucy Camp (daughter of Elizabeth, nee Clements, and her first husband, James
Camp) (2nd husband Ambrose Dudley) who were the parents, among others, of Elizabeth Camp Harris, who married 25
June1795, John Pryor Perkins, born ca 1760 at Perkins Ferry, Halifax County,Virginia. (Ref: Marriages of Pittsylvania
County, Virginia, 1767-1805, p. 25, by Catherine L. Knorr;
Descendants of Nicholas Perkins of Virginia, pp. 56, 57, 61, 124, 126 on no. 3324-1, by Wm. K. Hall, Pub. Edw. Bros.,
Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1957;
The will of Rev. Samuel Harris, {Col. F. E. Swar} dated 3 June 1799; Probated 21 October 1799, Will Book 11, p. 222,
Pittsylvania County, Virginia.
John Pryor Perkins and his wife, Elizabeth (Harris) Perkins filed suit against the executors of Rev. Samuel Harris's estate 16
December 1799 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. (Court Records Book 9, p. 213.) This suit ran for 20 years. (Pittsylvania
County Court & Records may divulge important data re: land grants Williamson County, Tennessee.)
Eliza C. (Harris) Perkins, Executrix. Book 1, pp. 162-167, Williamson County, Tennessee.
Eliza C. Harris allotment of dower dated 27 September 1820, presented to the October Court, 1820. Book 3, p. 210,
Williamson County, Tennessee.
Eliza C. (Harris) Perkins will, dated 16 December 1848; codicils 24 November 1849; 2 September 1851. Probated October
Court, Book 1, p.300, 1851, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. She named, among others, her grandson, James P. Perkins (great
grandfather oc. Cdr. Robert Wallace Parker. For descent from Jas. P. Perkins, see p. 287, Descendants of Nicholas
Perkins of Virginia. (Hall)
Descendants of Jeremiah Clement
Generation No. 1
1. Jeremiah1 Clement. He married Agnes Webster 1577 in County Hunts, England.
Children of Jeremiah Clement and Agnes Webster are:
2. i. JEFFREY2 CLEMENT, d. 1609, Oxford, England.
ii. JOHN CLEMENT.
Generation No. 2
2. Jeffrey2 Clement (Jeremiah1) died 1609 in Oxford, England. He married Lady Elizabeth Fuller 1590 in England, daughter of Cuthbert Fuller.
Elizabeth immigrated to Jamestown, Virginia, 10 June 1611, aboard the ship "George." She married (2) Colonel Ralph Homor, 1621. She died
Bef. 1633 in Virginia.
Children of Jeffrey Clement and Elizabeth Fuller are:
i. NICHOLAS3 CLEMENT.
ii. EZECHIAL CLEMENT.
3. iii. JEREMIAH CLEMENT, b. 1607, England; d.1652, Virginia.
iv. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
Generation No. 3
3. Jeremiah3 Clement (Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1607 in England, and died 1652 in Virginia. He married Edy (unknown) 1634 in James Citie.
Edy married (2) Capt. Henry Perry Bef. 17 March 1657.
Children of Jeremiah Clement and Edy (unknown) are:
4 i. CAPT. JOHN4 CLEMENT, b. 1631,Virginia.
ii. EZEKIEL CLEMENT.
5. iii. CAPT. FRANCIS CLEMENT, b. Surry County, Virginia; d. 1721.
iv. AMY CLEMENT.
Generation No. 4
4. Capt. John4 Clement (Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1631 in Virginia. He married Mary (unknown).
Children of John Clement and Mary (unknown) are:
i. SAMUEL5 CLEMENT.
6. ii. WILLIAM CLEMENT, b. 1670; d. 1760.
7. iii. JOHN CLEMENT.
iv. ANNE CLEMENT.
v. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
5. Capt. Francis4 Clement (Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born in Surry County, Virginia, and died 1721. He married (1) Elizabeth
Meriweather, daughter of Nicholas Meriweather and Elizabeth (unknown). He married (2) Lydia Vaughan Abt. 1711 in Virginia. Lydia was the
widow of George Blighton. After the death of Francis she married (3) Richard Ogelby.
Children of Francis Clement and Elizabeth Meriweather (and/or Lydia Vaughan) are:
i. FRANCIS5 CLEMENT, JR..
ii. THOMAS CLEMENT.
iii. MARY CLEMENT.
8. iv. BENJAMIN5 CLEMENT.
9. v. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
Generation No. 5
6. William5 Clement (John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1670, and died 1760. He married Anne Taylor.
Children of William Clement and Anne Taylor are:
10. i. BENJAMIN6 CLEMENT, b. 1700; d. 1780.
11. ii. WILLIAM CLEMENT.
iii. JOHN CLEMENT.
iv. FRANCIS CLEMENT.
v. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
vi. BERSHEBA CLEMENT.
vii. ANNE CLEMENT.
7. John5 Clement (John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1)
Children of John Clement are:
i. JANE6 CLEMENT.
ii. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
iii. ANN CLEMENT.
iv. JOHN CLEMENT.
v. SAMUEL CLEMENT.
vi. BABARY CLEMENT.
vii. MARY ANN CLEMENT.
viii. AGNESS CLEMENT.
ix. LYDIA CLEMENT.
x. BENJAMIN CLEMENT.
xi. FRANCIS CLEMENT.
8. Benjamin5 Clement (Francis4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) He married Judith Parker, daughter of Richard Parker and Mary (unknown).
Child of Benjamin Clement and Judith Parker is:
i. BENJAMIN6 CLEMENT, JR.
9. Elizabeth5 Clement (Francis4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) She married (1) James Camp. She married (2) Ambrose Dudley.
Child of Elizabeth Clement and James Camp is:
i. LUCY6 CAMP, m. SAMUEL HARRIS; b. 12 January 1723/24, Hanover County, Virginia.
Generation No. 6
10. Benjamin6 Clement (William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1700, and died 1780. He married Susannah Hill 1727.
Children of Benjamin Clement and Susannah Hill are:
12. i. ISAAC7 CLEMENT, b. 1727; d. 1816.
13. ii. ADAM CLEMENT, b. 1739; d. 1813.
iii. BENJAMIN CLEMENT.
iv. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
v. JAMES CLEMENT.
vii. JURIAH CLEMENT.
viii. RACHEL CLEMENT.
ix. SUSANNAH CLEMENT.
x. STEPHEN CLEMENT.
11. William6 Clement (William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1)
Children of William Clement are:
i. LUCY7 CLEMENT.
ii. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
iii. SAMUEL CLEMENT.
iv. WILLIAM CLEMENT.
v. HENRY CLEMENT.
Generation No. 7
12. Isaac7 Clement (Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1727, and died 1816. He married Ann Denham 1765.
She was born 1743, and died 1804.
Children of Isaac Clement and Ann Denham are:
i. HUGH8 CLEMENT.
14. ii. STEPHEN CLEMENT, b. 1772; d. 1856.
iii. ISAAC CLEMENT.
iv. BENJAMIN CLEMENT.
v. ADAM CLEMENT.
vi. DANIEL CLEMENT.
vii. DAUGHTERS CLEMENT.
13. Adam7 Clement (Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1739, and died 1813. He married Agnes Johnson 1765.
She was born 1746.
Children of Adam Clement and Agnes Johnson are:
15. i. SAMUEL8 CLEMENS, d. 1805.
ii. JOHNSON CLEMENT, m. MISS SCALES.
iii. BENJAMIN CLEMENT.
16. iv. ADAM CLEMENT, JR., b. 1781; d. 1858.
v. JURIAH CLEMENT, m. THEOPHILUS LACY.
vi. CHARLES CLEMENT, m. NANCY HAMILTON.
vii. GEORGE W. CLEMENT, d. 1867; m.(1) STELLA SMITH, 1811; m. (2) SALLY TURNER COOK.
viii. WILLIAM CLEMENT.
ix. ROBERT ALEXANDER CLEMENT.
x. SUSANNE CLEMENT, m. CONSTANTINE PERKENS.
xi. AGNES CLEMENT.
xii. SALLY CLEMENT, m. TUCKER MOORE.
Generation No. 8
14. Stephen8 Clement (Isaac7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1772, and died 1856. He married Susannah
Palmer 1792. She was born 1774, and died 1830.
Children of Stephen Clement and Susannah Palmer are:
i. ASRIM9 CLEMENT, m. JUDITH F. CRIGLER.
ii. ANN CLEMENT, m. R. S. THOMPSON.
iii. MARY CLEMENT, m. BILLIE DEWS.
iv. RACHEL CLEMENT, m. BEN CLEMENT.
v. SUSAN CLEMENT.
vi. JOHN CLEMENT.
vii. MARTHA CLEMENT.
viii. LAFAYETTE CLEMENT, m. PHOEBE CLARK WILLIAMS.
17. ix. ELIZABETH CLEMENT.
15. Samuel Clemens8 (Adam7 Clement, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) died 1805. He married Pemela Goggin 1793.
Child of Samuel Clemens and Pemela Goggin is:
18. i. JOHN MARSHALL9 CLEMENS, b. 1798; d. 1847.
16. Adam8 Clement, Jr. (Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1781, and died 1858. He married Nancy
Alexander 1810. She was born 1784, and died 1854.
Children of Adam Clement and Nancy Alexander are:
i. ROBERT A.9 CLEMENT, b. 1812; d. 1872; m. MARY TERRY.
ii. WILLIAM A. CLEMENT, b. 1813; d.1876; m. (1) LOUISA J. HUNTER, 1836, m. (2) MRS. Mary Perkins
iii. JOHN N. CLEMENT, m. SUSAN THOMPSON.
19 iv. CHARLES B. J. CLEMENT, b. 1815; d. 1880.
v. GEORGE W. CLEMENT, m. ISABELLA CLEMENT.
i. ADAM CLEMENT, b. 1826; d. 1916; m. (1) MARTHA COCKE; m. (2) ANN COCKE.
vii. NANCY A. CLEMENT, m. GEORGE W.CLEMENT, JR..
viii. JULIETTE C. CLEMENT, m. CHARLES SLAUGHTER.
ix. MARY CLEMENT, m. (UNKNOWN) JENNINGS.
Generation No. 9
17. Elizabeth9 Clement (Stephen8, Isaac7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) She married J. Robert (unknown).
Child of Elizabeth Clement and J. Robert (unknown) is:
i. MARY10 (UNKNOWN).
18. John Marshall9 Clemens (Samuel8, Adam7 Clement, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1798, and died
1847. He married Jane Lampton.
Child of John Clemens and Jane Lampton is:
i. SAMUEL L.10 CLEMENS, b. 1835; d.1910; m. OLIVIA LONGDON, 1870; b. 1847; d. 1904.
Samuel L. Clemens is also known as Mark Twain.
19. Charles B. J.9 Clement (Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1815, and died 1880. He married
Catherine Thompson 1857. She was born 1833, and died 1866.
Children of Charles Clement and Catherine Thompson are:
i. JOHN10 CLEMENT.
20. ii. ROBERT A. CLEMENT, b. 1860; d. 1952.
21. iii. CHARLES CLEMENT, b. 1863; d. 1947.
Generation No. 10
20. Robert A.10 Clement (Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1860, and died
1952. He married Ada Rosser 1883. She was born 1872, and died 1952.
Children of Robert Clement and Ada Rosser are:
22. i. CHARLES C.11 CLEMENT, b. 1889.
23. ii. WILLIAM R. CLEMENT, b. 1892.
iii. EVA CATHERINE CLEMENT, b. 1895; d. 1959; m. CARL DELLINGER, 1920; b. 1893; d.
1929.
21. Charles10 Clement (Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1863, and died 1947.
He married (1) Claire England 1894. She was born 1872, and died 1929. He married (2) (Unknown) Armstrong 1929.
Children of Charles Clement and Claire England are:
24. i. CHARLES M.11 CLEMENT, b.1895.
25. ii. ROGER CLEMENT, b. 1897.
26. iii. ROLAND CLEMENT, b. 1902.
iv. KATHLEEN CLEMENT, m. HENRY C. KUTZ.
Generation No. 11
22. Charles C.11 Clement (Robert A.10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1889.
He married Nelly Crump 1915. She was born 1890.
Child of Charles Clement and Nelly Crump is:
i. CHARLES C.12 CLEMENT, JR., b. 1917; d. 1931.
23. William R.11 Clement (Robert A.10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1892.
He married Marguerite Scott 1917. She was born 1894, and died 1923.
Children of William Clement and Marguerite Scott are:
27. i. WILLIAM S.12 CLEMENT, b. 1918.
ii. HENRIETTA CLEMENT, b. 1920.
iii. RITA CLEMENT, b. 1921; m. J. DUDLEY.
24. Charles M.11 Clement (Charles10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1895.
He married Marion Talbot 1922. She was born 1900.
Child of Charles Clement and Marion Talbot is:
i. MARION12 CLEMENT, b. 1923; m. E.G. ADAIR, JR.; b. 1923.
25. Roger11 Clement (Charles10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1897. He
married Juanita Ritnour 1922. She was born 1898.
Children of Roger Clement and Juanita Ritnour are:
i. RUTH12 CLEMENT, b. 1923; m. R. BARLOW, 1946.
ii. CLARA CLEMENT, b. 1925; m. WILLIAM E. NELSON, JR., 1950.
28. iii. JOHN R. CLEMENT, b. 1928.
26. Roland11 Clement (Charles10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born 1902. He
married Mary Bywaters 1923. She was born 1903.
Children of Roland Clement and Mary Bywaters are:
29. i. CHARLES F.12 CLEMENT, b.1924.
ii. ROLAND CLEMENT, JR., b. 1930.
iii. WILLIAM M. CLEMENT, b. 1933.
Generation No. 12
27. William S.12 Clement (William R.11, Robert A.10, Charles B.J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1)
was born 1918. He married Ruth Dietz 1943. She was born 1923.
Children of William Clement and Ruth Dietz are:
i. JUNE13 CLEMENT, b. 1951.
ii. LEONE CLEMENT, b. 1953.
28. John R.12 Clement (Roger11, Charles10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was born
1928. He married Jaqueline Breedlove 1950.
Children of John Clement and Jaqueline Breedlove are:
i. DIANE13 CLEMENT, b. 1951.
ii. ROBERT E. CLEMENT, b. 1954.
iii. G?? CLEMENT, b. 1956
iv. SHEILA CLEMENT, b. 1961.
29. Charles F.12 Clement (Roland11, Charles10, Charles B. J.9, Adam8, Adam7, Benjamin6, William5, John4, Jeremiah3, Jeffrey2, Jeremiah1) was
born 1924. He married Sa??? Curtis 1947.
Children of Charles Clement and Sa??? Curtis are:
i. SO??E13 CLEMENT, b. 1949.
ii. MARY CLEMENT, b. 1950.
iii. ROBERT E. CLEMENT, b. 1952.
iv. (UNKNOWN) CLEMENT, b. 1955.
The London-Virginia Company
1500-1600s , Virginia
London Company
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Virginia Company of London Seal
The London Company (also called the Charter of the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I of England on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. It was not founded as a joint stock company, but became one under the 1609 charter. It was one of two such companies, along with the Plymouth Company, that was granted an identical charter as part of the Virginia Company. The London Company was responsible for establishing the Jamestown Settlement, the first permanent English settlement in the present United States in 1607, and in the process of sending additional supplies, inadvertently settled the Somers Isles (present day Bermuda), the oldest-remaining English colony, in 1609.
The territory granted to the London Company included the coast of North America from 34th parallel (Cape Fear) north to the 41st parallel (in Long Island Sound), but being part of the Virginia Company and Colony, the London Company owned a large portion of Atlantic and Inland Canada. The company was permitted by its charter to establish a 100-square-mile (260 km2) settlement within this area. The portion of the company's territory north of the 38th parallel was shared with the Plymouth Company, with the stipulation that neither company found a colony within 100 miles (161 km) of each other.
On May 24, 1607, the London Company established the Jamestown Settlement on the James River about 40 miles (64 km) upstream from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay at Cape Henry. Later in 1607, the Plymouth Company established its Popham Colony in present day Maine, but it was abandoned after about a year. By 1609, the Plymouth Company had dissolved. As a result, the charter for the London Company was adjusted with a new grant that extended from "sea to sea" of the previously-shared area between the 34th and 40th parallel. It was amended in 1612 to include the new territory of Bermuda.
The London Company struggled financially for a number of years, with results improving after sweeter strains of tobacco than the native variety were cultivated and successfully exported from Virginia as a cash crop beginning in 1612. In 1624, the company lost its charter, and Virginia became a royal colony.
Contents[hide]
1 History
2 Indian relationships
3 Conversion to royal colony
4 See also
5 References
6 Further reading
7 External links
[edit] History
"The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles", by Capt. John Smith
The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. The overlapping area (yellow) was granted to both companies on the stipulation that neither found a settlement within 100 miles (160 km) of each other. The location of the Jamestown Settlement is shown by "J"; other early settlements, Québec, Port-Royal, Popham, and Saint Augustine, are also shown
The 1609 grant to the Virginia Company of London "from sea to sea" is shown demarcated in red. The later grant to the Plymouth Council of New England is shown in green.
The business of the company was the settlement of the Virginia colony using, as the labor force, voluntary transportees under the customary indenture system whereby in exchange for seven years of labor for the company, the company provided passage, food, protection and land ownership.
In December 1606, the Virginia Company's three ships, containing 144 men and boys (40 died during the voyage[citation needed]), set sail from Blackwall, London. After an unusually long voyage of 144 days, they made landfall on April 26, 1607 at the southern edge of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, which they named Cape Henry. At the bay, they were attacked by Native Americans.That pushed them North. On May 14, 1607, these first settlers selected the site of Jamestown Island as the place to build their fort.
In addition to survival, the early colonists had another pressing mission: to make a profit for the owners of the Virginia Company. Although the settlers were disappointed that gold did not wash up on the beach and gems did not grow in the trees, they realized there was great potential for wealth of other kinds in their new home. Early industries, such as glass manufacture, pitch and tar production and beer and wine making took advantage of natural resources and the land's fertility. From the outset it was thought that the abundance of timber would be the primary leg of the economy, as Britain's forests had long been felled. The seemingly inexhaustible supply of cheap American timber was to be the primary enabler of England's (and then Britain's) rise to maritime (merchant and naval) supremacy. However, the settlers could not devote as much time as the Virginia Company would have liked to their financial responsibilities. They were too busy trying to survive.
Within the three-sided fort erected on the banks of the James, the settlers quickly discovered that they were, first and foremost, employees of the Virginia Company of London, following instructions of the men appointed by the Company to rule them. In exchange, the laborers were armed and received clothes and food from the common store. After seven years, they were to receive land of their own. The gentlemen, who provided their own armor and weapons, were to be paid in land, dividends or additional shares of stock.
Initially, the colonists were governed by a president and seven-member council selected by the King. Leadership problems quickly erupted and Jamestown's first two leaders coped with varying degrees of success with sickness, Indian assaults, poor food and water supplies and class strife.
When Captain John Smith became Virginia's third president, he proved the strong leader that the colony needed. Industry flourished and relations with Chief Powhatan's people improved. In 1609, the Virginia Company received its Second Charter, which allowed the Company to choose its new governor from amongst its shareholders. Investment boomed as the Company launched an intensive recruitment campaign. Over 600 colonists set sail for Virginia between March 1608 and March 1609.
Unfortunately for these new settlers, Sir Thomas Gates, Virginia's deputy governor, bound for the colony aboard the Sea Venture, was shipwrecked in Bermuda, along with the Admiral of the Company, Sir George Somers, Captain Newport, and 147 other settlers and seamen. When Gates arrived to take up his new post in 1610, with most of the survivors of the Sea Venture (on two new ships built in Bermuda, the Deliverance and the Patience) he found only 60 of the original 214 colonists had survived the infamous "Starving Time" of 1609-1610[1], and most of these were dying or ill. Despite the abundance of food they had brought from Bermuda (which had necessitated the building of two ships), it was clear the colony did not have the means for survival. The survivors of Jamestown were taken aboard the Deliverance and the Patience, and the colony was abandoned. It was intended to return everyone to England, but the fortuitous arrival of another relief fleet, bearing Governor Lord De la Warre, granted Jamestown a reprieve. All the settlers were put ashore again , and Sir George Somers returned to Bermuda aboard the Patience to obtain more food (Somers died there, and his nephew, Matthew Somers, the captain of the Patience, took the vessel to Lyme Regis, instead, to claim his inheritance).
When news of Virginia's woeful state reached London, the result was predictable: financial catastrophe for the Company. Many new subscribers reneged payment on their shares, and the Company became entangled in dozens of court cases. On top of these losses, the Company was forced to incur further debt when it sent hundreds more colonists to Virginia.
There was little to counter this crushing debt. No gold had been found in Virginia; trading commodities produced by exploitation of the raw materials found in the New World were minimal. Attempts at producing glass, pitch, tar and potash had been barely profitable and, regrettably, such commodities could be had far more cheaply on the other side of the Atlantic.
Increasingly bad publicity, political infighting and financial woes led the Virginia Company to organize a massive advertising campaign. The Company plastered street corners with tempting broadsheets, published persuasive articles, and even convinced the clergy to preach of the virtues of supporting colonization. Before the Company was dissolved, it would publish twenty-seven books and pamphlets promoting the Virginia venture.
To make shares more marketable, the Virginia Company changed its sales pitch. Instead of promising instant returns and vast profits for investors, the Company exploited patriotic sentiment and national pride. A stockholder was assured that his purchase of shares would help build the might of England, to make her the power she deserved to be. The heathen natives would be converted to the proper form of Christianity, the Church of England. People out of work could find employment in the New World. The standard of living would increase across the nation. How could any good, patriotic Englishman resist?
The English rose to the bait. The gentry wished to win favor by proving their loyalty to the crown. The growing middle class also saw stock purchasing as a way to better itself. But the news was not all good. Although the population of Jamestown rose, high settler mortality kept profits unstable. By 1612, the Company's debts had soared to over £1000.
A third charter provided a short-term resolution to the Virginia Company's problems. The Company was permitted to run a lottery as a fundraising venture. Other attractive features of the charter allowed Virginia's assembly to act as the colony's legislature and also added 300 leagues of ocean to the colony's holdings, which would include Bermuda (sometimes known as Virgineola) as part of Virginia. But the colony was still on shaky ground until John Rolfe's successful experiment with tobacco as a cash crop provided a way to recoup financially.
Unfortunately, by 1616, the Virginia Company suffered further adversity. The original settlers were owed their land and stock shares; initial investors at home were owed their dividends. The Company was forced to renege on its cash promises, instead distributing 50 acre (200,000 m²) lots in payment. The next year, the Company instituted the headright system, a way to bring more settlers to Virginia. Investors and residents were able to acquire land in paying the passage of new settlers. In most cases, these newcomers spent a period of time in servitude on the investor's land. Edwin Sandys, a leading force in the Virginia Company, strongly supported the headright system, for his goal was a permanent colony which would enlarge British territory, relieve the nation's overpopulation, and expand the market for English goods. Sir Thomas Smith, as the Company's Treasurer, had a different dream: the Virginia Company's mission was to trade and to make a profit.
Saint George's town, in the Islands of Bermuda, or The Somers Isles, was founded by the Virginia Company in 1612, following the wrecking of the Company's flagship, the Sea Venture, in Bermuda in 1609 during the Third Supply to Jamestown. A second company, the Somers Isles Company, was formed by the same shareholders, and managed Bermuda independently from 1615 until 1684.
In the end, it was Sandys' vision which prevailed. When he became Treasurer of the Company in 1619, he moved forward to populate the colony and earn a protective status for the tobacco crop which had become the cash crop of Virginia. At the same time, he urged colonists to diversify their plantings and thus become less reliant on only one staple. The colonists ignored this advice, to their later dismay.
In 1619, the Company issued a grant to one John Wincob, which was originally to be used by the English Separatist Pilgrims for settling in the New World. (It was abandoned by the Pilgrims when they instead decided to use a grant issued by the Company to their financial backers. Since their crossing on the Mayflower landed them in what is now New England, beyond the lands controlled by the Company, this grant was also effectively abandoned.)[2]
In 1621, the Company was in trouble (oh no); unpaid dividends and increased use of lotteries had made future investors wary. The Company debt was now over £9000. Worried Virginians were hardly reassured by the advice of pragmatic Treasurer Sandys, who warned that the Company "cannot wish you to rely on anything but yourselves." In March 1622, the Company's and the colony's situation went from dire to disastrous when the Powhatan Indians staged an uprising which wiped out a quarter of the European population of Virginia. When a fourth charter, severely reducing the Company's ability to make decisions in the governing of Virginia, was proposed by the Crown, subscribers rejected it. King James I forthwith changed the status of Virginia in 1624. Virginia was now a royal colony to be administered by a governor appointed by the King. The Virginia Assembly finally received royal approval, in 1627, and this form of government, with governor and assembly, would oversee the colony of Virginia until 1776, excepting only the years of the English Commonwealth.
Bermuda had been separated, in 1614, when the Crown briefly took over its administration. In 1615, the shareholders of the Virginia Company created a new company, the Somers Isles Company, which continued to operate Bermuda, subsequently, also known officially as The Somers Isles (for the Admiral of the Virginia Company, Sir George Somers) until it, too, was dissolved in 1684.
[edit] Indian relationships
The instructions issued to Sir Thomas Gates, on November 20, called for a forcible conversion of Native Americans to Anglicanism and subordination to the colonial administration. The records of the company record a discussion during one of their first meetings about publishing a justification of their business enterprise and methods to "give adventurers, a clearness and satisfaction, for the justice of the action, and so encourage them". Others opposed this, arguing that "there is much a confession in every apology" and called for "quietness and no doubting" not wanting to create a public debate where Catholics and neutrals might attack them. Whereas Catholic arguments would be in support of Spanish legal claims to the New World under the Treaty of Tordesillas, it was feared that the neutral "pen-adversaries" might "cast scruples into our conscience" by criticising the lawfulness of the plantation. It was decided to forego such a publication of a justification.
However, in 1608, Sir Edward Coke, in his capacity as Lord Chief Justice, offered a ruling in Calvin's Case which went beyond the issue at hand: whether a Scotsman could seek justice at an English Court. Coke distinguished between aliens from nations at war with England and friendly aliens, those from nations in league with England. Friendly aliens could have recourse to English courts. But he also ruled that with "all infidels" (i.e. those from non-Christian nations) there could be no peace, and a state of perpetual hostility would exist between them and Christians.
In 1609, the company issued instructions to kidnap Native American children so as to indoctrinate them with English values and religion. These instructions also sanctioned attacking the Iniocasoockes, the cultural leaders of the local Powhatans. However, it was only when Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, arrived, in 1610, that the Company was able to commence a war against the Powhatan with the First Anglo-Powhatan War. De La Warr was replaced by Sir Thomas Dale, who continued the war. It was during this period that Pocahontas married John Rolfe.
The military offensive was accompanied by a propaganda war: Alderman Robert Johnson published Nova Britannia, in 1609, which compared Native Americans to wild animals--"heardes of deere in a forest". While it portrayed the Powhatans as peace loving, it nevertheless threatened to deal with any who resisted conversion to Anglicanism as enemies of 'their' country. (Johnson was the son-in-law of Sir Thomas Smith, leader of one of the court factions within the Company in London.)
In 1622, the Second Anglo-Powhatan War erupted. Its origins are disputed. English apologists for the company say that Opchanacanough initiated the war. Robert Williams, a contemporary Native American Law Professor, argues that Opchanacanough had secured concessions from Governor Yeardley which the company would not accept. Thus, Opchanacanough's attack, on March 22, 1622, may have been a pre-emptive attempt to defeat the colony before reinforcements arrived. In about a day, 350 out of 1,240 colonists were killed, and some outlying settlements were wiped out. The Virginia Company quickly published an account of this attack which was steeped in Calvinist theology--the massacre was the work of providence in that it gave a justification for the complete genocide of the Powhatans, and the building of settlements on their former towns. New orders called for a "perpetual war without peace or truce" "to root out from being any longer a people, so cursed a nation, ungrateful to all benefitte, and incapable of all goodnesses."
[edit] Conversion to royal colony
In 1624, the Virginia Company lost its charter, and Virginia became a royal colony.
Virginia Company
Geoffrey Clements, of Oxford, England, helped organize and charter the "Virginia London Company" at Jamestown, Virginia.
Just before sailing for Virginia, he died in 1609 at Oxford. His widow, Elizabeth Fuller Clements, with four children: Nicholas, Ezchial, Elizabeth and Jeremiah "Jeremey", and two white servants, Jefferis Hull and Dorothy Greene, came to Jamestown on the ship "George" on 10 JUNE 1611.
Geoffrey Clements & Elizabeth Fuller
This was found here: http://genforum.com/clements/messages/2041.html
GEOFFREY CLEMENTS CHaRTERED THE VIRGINIA-LONDON COMPANY IN 1607
IN LONDON. HOWEVER, HE DIED IN OXFORD IN 1609, NEVER HAVING
SAILED TO THE NEW WORLD COLONY OF VIRGINIA. HIS WIDOW ELIZABETH
AND FOUR OF THEIR CHILDREN CAME TO AMERICA IN THE SHIP "GEORGE"
LANDING AT JAMESTOWN IN 1617. IN 1623, ELIZABETH REMARRIED TO
CAPTAIN RALPH HAMOR (HAMAR)
THE WIDOW ELIZABETH CLEMENTS ARRRIVED AT JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA
ABOARD THE SHIP "GEORGE" IN 1617. WITH HER CAME FOUR CHILDREN,
EZEKIEL, NICHOLAS,JEREMIAH, AND ELIZABETH. THE WIDOW ELIZABETH
REMARRIED IN 1623 TO CAPT. RALPH HAMOR (HAMAR).
"ADVENTURES OF PURSE AND PERSON" VIRGINIA, PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF
FIRST FAMILIES OF VIRGINIA, THIRD EDITION.
MRS. ELIZABETH (FULLER) CLEMENTS CAME TO VIRGINIA WITH HER
FAMILY IN THE "GEORGE", 1617. AND AS MRS. HAMOR WAS LISTED,
1623/24, AT JAMES CITY WITH HER SECOND HUSBAND AND TWO OF HER
CHILDREN BY HER FIRST MARRIAGE TO GEORGGREY CLEMENTS (JEREMIAH
AND ELIZABETH). THE FAMILY WAS ALSO LISTED AT JAMES CITY INT THE
MUSTER OF 1624/25.
SHE WAS THE DAUGHTER OF CUTHBERT FULLER (BAPTIZED 4 SEPT.1542),
A SON OF NICHOLAS FULLER, MERCHANT OF LONDON. HER UNCLE,
NICHOLAS FULLER OF CHAMBERHOUSE, BERKSHIRE, WHO WAS A MEMEBER OF
THE VIRGINIA COMPANY, LEFT A WILL, 19 FEB 1619/20-1 MAR 1619/20,
WHICH MENTIONS ELIZABETH CLEMENTS, DAUGHTER OF HIS BROTHER
CUTHBERT FULLER, HER LATE HUSBAND JEFFERY CLEMENTS AND HER SON
NICHOLAS CLEMENTS. HER FIRST COUSIN, JOHN CLEMENTS, SON OF JOHN
AND MARGERY CLEMENTS, OF STEPNEY, MIDDLESEX, IN HIS WILL,
PROBATED 17 MAY 1620, LEFT TO HIS UNCLE CLEMENTS DUAGHER
(ELIZABETH) HIS INTEREST IN THE SAILING SHIP "GEORGE"
HER HUSBAND, GEOFFREY (JEFFERY) CLEMENTS, APPARENTLY DIED IN
ENGLAND. FOLLOWING HER ARRIVAL IN VIRGINIA, ELIZABETH (FULLER)
CLEMENTS MARRIED AGAIN TO CAPT. RALPH HAMOR, MEMBER OF THE
VIRGINIA COMPANY, WHO CAME TO VIRGINIA IN 1609; WAS SECRETARY OF
THE COLONY 1611-1614; RETURNED TO ENGLAND WHERE HE WROTE " A
TRUE DISCOURSE OF THE PRESENT ESTATE OF VIRGINIA" PUBLISHED
1615; CAME TO VIRGINIA AGAIN IN 1617, AS VICE-ADMIRAL TO SIR
SAMUEL ARGALL. CAPT. HAMOR WAS A MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL,
1621-1626, AND DIED BEFORE 11 OCTOBER 1626, WHEN MRS. ELIZABETH
HAMOR WAS GRANTED ADMINISTRATION OF HIS ESTATE, HAVING BEEN
NAMED THE SOLE EXECUTRIX OF HIS WILL. BY 8 FEBRUARY 1627/28,
SHE HAD MARRIED AGAIN TO CAPT. TOBIAS FELGATE, A MARINER, WHO
WAS CAPTAIN OF THE "DEFIANCE"SHE PETITIONED THE COURT ON THAT
DATE TO RELIEVE HER OF THE RESPONSIBILITY OF FURTHER
ADMINISTERING THE ESTATE OF CAPT. RALPH HAMOR, DECEASED, AS SHE
EXPECTED TO GO TO ENGLAND SHORTLY. SHE DIED, PROBABLY IN
ENGLAND, BEEFORE 30 MARCH 1630, WHEN TOBIAS FELGATE MARIED SARAH
PRICE.
ON 26 AUGUST 1633, JEREMIAH CLEMENTS, SON AND HEIRE APPARANT FO
ELIZABETH CLEMENTS, DECEASED, PATENTED 350 ACRES UPON THE
EASTERLIE SIDE OF UPPER CHIPPOACKES CREEK DUE UNTO HIM IN RIGHT
OF THE SAID ELIZABETH CLEMETNS, HIS MOTHER, OF THE ADVENHIRE OF
SEAVEN PERSONS...HERSELFE...JEREMIAH CLEMENTS, NICHOLAS
CLEMENTS, EXECHIELL CLEMENTS, HER SONNS; ELIZABETH CLEMENTS, HER
DAUGHTER; DOROTHY GREENE AND JEFFERIE HULL, HER SERVANTS WHOE
ALL CAME OVER IN THE "GEORGE" IN 1617
"ADVENTURERS OF PURSE AND PERSON" PAGES 197-198
1623 CENSUS-JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA
"A LIST OF THE NAMES OF THOSE LIVING IN VIRGINIA"
FEBRUARY 16 1623
WILLIAM CLEMENTS P.170
JEREME CLEMENTS P. 174
ELIZABETH CLEMENTS P. 174
CAPT. RALPH HAMOR P. 174
MRS. HAMOR P. 174
THE MUSTER ROLL OF CAPT. RALPH HAMOR:
CAPT. RALPH HAMOR
MS. ELIZABETH HAMOR
JEREMY CLEMENTS
ELIZABETH CLEMENTS
Jeffrey Clement 1570 - 1690
Jeffrey Clement married Elizabeth Fuller in London, 1590. They had five children. Third son, Jeremiah, was born 1607. Jeffrey died in 1609 and his widow and four small children came to America on the good ship "George", landing at Jamestown, Virginia, June 10,1611. She married again in 1621, Colonel Ralph Hamor. (Taken from the very interesting magazine, Genealogy, edited by Wm. Montgomery Clements.Re:1, p.306. Re:2, p. 293 and Re: 13)
It is thought that Jeffrey Clement was a merchant with interest in theVirginia Trading Company. His widow may have come to America because of this interest.
have come to America because of this interest.
" The first of the name in America is said to have been Elizabeth Clement (nee Fuller) the widow of one Jeffrey of London, England, who came with her three small children to America in 1611 and settled at Jamestown, Virginia. The children were Jeremiah, Nicholas, and Elizabeth.
This Francis was the father, by his wife, Elizabeth Meriweather, of Francis, Benjamin, Thomas, Mary and Elizabeth"; (Re: 8)
rmarrs8added this on 14 Apr 2011
keen2hsoriginally submitted this to K. Camomile on 2 Nov 2008
  1. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  2. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Jeremiah Clements
  3. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  4. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey Lord Mayor of London Clements
  5. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II Lord Mayor of Clements
  6. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Jeremiah Clements
  7. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II Lord Mayor of Clements
  8. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  9. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  10. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey Lord Mayor of London Clements
  11. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  12. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Jeremiah Clements
  13. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II Lord Mayor of Clements
  14. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  15. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey Lord Mayor of London Clements
  16. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II Lord Mayor of Clements
  17. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  18. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements
  19. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey Lord Mayor of London Clements
  20. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Sir Geoffrey II, Lord Mayor of London Clements









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 Lord Mayor of London

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