Herleva (Falaise) Mortain

Herleva (Falaise) Mortain

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Herlève (Herleva) "Arlette, Harlette" Mortain formerly Falaise aka de Falaise, de Mortain
Born about in Calvados, Normandy, Francemap [uncertain]
Daughter of and [mother unknown]
Wife of — married about [location unknown]
Died about in Mortain, Normandy, Francemap
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Categories: Royal Mistresses | 11th Century.


Contents

Herleva


  • n. Herlava; Arlette (c.1003- c.1050)[1][2]
  • p. Fulbert de Falaise and Doda[3]
  • Robert, Duke of Normandy. Issue: 1
  • m. Herluin de Conteville. Issue: 3

Biography


Bree Ogle | Mar 2014 WikiTree --The earliest accounts of Herleva come from Orderic Vitalis (1075 – c. 1142).[4] They were not written down until 80 years after she met Robert the Magnificent. It was only through Wace and Benoit in the 12th century, and later 17th century writings, that she became known as a the daughter of tanner.[5]


Scholarship discounts this based on examination of the original source, the context of the public heckling of Duke William, and the Latin and French words later chroniclers had trouble translating.[5]


According to van Houts (1986), Fulbert was probably a mortician. He is described as, "a person who laid out corpses," and "might have embalmed bodies." As Chamberlain of the ducal court, this was one of Fulbert's duties.[5]


♥ Danesche Manere ♥


Herleve married Robert II, Duke of Normandy according to the "Danish Way."[6] "A legitimate wife according to old Norman traditions,"[6] she eventually had William the Conqueror. At the same time, up-and-coming reformists like pope Gregory VII (Hildebrand of Sovana) hoped to ban these customs and establish authoritarian rule. As a "concubine" through this lens, a "frilla" like Herleve is a glance at the long process of the Christianization of Europe, and the outing of indigenous culture.[7][8]


Still struggling for power and legitimacy, the seat of Rome had barely cleaned up its own house, before it got caught between the Roman aristocracy, and the slaughter of the Saracens and unstoppable Norman "barbarians." Unable to maintain its own security, the papacy cut a deal with the devil, and asked for the backing of the Norman military. It worked, but Rome paid a fateful price before it was able to achieve absolute rule.[8]


So at this juncture, the lack of a wedding sanctioned by the Roman church was no threat to the rank or inheritance of England's future Norman king.[9] And by the time the Conqueror was on the throne, the papacy was lucky to have any influence on him at all.[10] Incidentally, William was born around c.1028 in Falaise, Normandy.[11]


Herluin de Conteville


It is assumed that after Robert died in 1035, Herleve married Herluin de Conteville. They had three children:

  1. Eudes/Odo, Bishop of Bayeux (d. Jan 1097).
  2. Robert de Mortain, (b. after 1040 - d. 8 Dec 1090).
  3. dau m. Guillaume de la Ferté-Macé[12][citation needed]


✝ Abbey Notre Dame de Grestain ✝


At some point, Herlave's second husband supposedly had leprosy.[13] This is said to have inspired the couple to found the Abbey Notre-Dame de Grestain in 1050,[13] but other sources state Herleva had no part in it.[14] It's assumed Herlave is buried there or Mortain, Haute-Normandie.[15][16]


Links


Footnotes

  1. place of her birth is unknown. Some say the family was from Chaumont in the diocese of Liège but moved to Falaise, Calvados, Basse Normandie. Other state they were from Huy.[citation needed]
  2. Suggested Reading
    Abbott, Jacob. William the Conqueror (1903), p. 41
    "Dux Robertus, nato dicto Guillelmo, in isto eodem anno matrem pueri, quam defloraverat, duxit in uxorem."
    Chronicle of St-Maxentius (quoted Freeman 1870:611).
    Crouch, D. (2002). The Normans- The History of a Dynasty. pp 52–53, 58. Hambledon.
    Douglas, D.C. (1964). William the Conqueror. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. pp. 15,381-382.
    Freeman, E. A. (1867). The History of the Norman Conquest. pp. 530, 615.
    "When the said William had been born, in that same year Duke Robert took as his wife the boy's mother, whom he had deflowered." (Freeman, 1870, pp.615).
    McLynn, F. (1999). 1066: The Year of the Three Battles. pp. 21–23.
    Palgrave, F. (1864). The History of Normandy and of England. pp.145
  3. Royals and Nobles: A Genealogist's Tool. pp.45. iUniverse, 2002. Google Books
  4. Wikipedia: Orderic Vitalis: 'Orderic Vitalis (Ordericus) (1075 – c. 1142) was an English chronicler and Benedictine monk who wrote one of the great contemporary chronicles of 11th- and 12th-century Normandy and Anglo-Norman England.' As such, bias idealizing the Catholic Church may have been injected for the benefit of his faith.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2
    The Origins of Herleva, Mother of William the Conqueror. Elisabeth M. C. van Houts. The English Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 399 (Apr. 1986), pp. 399-404. Oxford University Press. JSTOR. Retrieved 26 Mar 2014.
  6. 6.0 6.1
    Arlette. Abbey Notre-Dame de Grestain
  7. Abbey Notre-Dame de Grestain: The family of Arlette.
  8. 8.0 8.1
    Norwich, John Julius (2011). A History of the Papacy: Absolute Monarchs. NY: Random House. eBook.
  9. Danish Way
  10. Wikipedia:Pope Gregory VII
  11. "William the Conqueror," (n.d.). Bio. Web. Accessed 08 Mar 2014.
  12. One GEDCOM file asserts she had another daughter with Robert named Adelaide of Normandy (1029-1090).
  13. 13.0 13.1
    Wikipedia: Grestain Abbey
  14. Wikipedia: Herleva
  15. Ogle, B. (2014, March 26). Herlave Falaise Mortain: Biography. WikiTree. Web.
  16. Bree Ogle (Mar 2014). Herleva and Robert II the Magnificient: A look at the “Danish Marriage.” family.oglemedia.com. Weblog. © Creative Commons 4.0

Edited for Jan 2014 Style Guide . Gedcoms in Changes.

badges This person was a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in Europe. If you are interested in this profile, see our European Royals and Aristocrats 742-1499 Project.






Memories: 1

On December 4, 2011 Roger Wehr wrote:

According to one legend, still recounted by tour guides at Falaise, it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy saw Herleva from the roof of his castle tower. The walkway on the roof still looks down on the dyeing trenches cut into stone in the courtyard below, which can be seen to this day from the tower ramparts above. The traditional way of dyeing leather or garments was for individuals to trample barefoot on the garments which were awash in the dyeing liquid in these trenches. Herleva, legend goes, seeing the Duke on his ramparts above, raised her skirts perhaps a bit more than necessary in order to attract the Duke's eye. The latter was immediately smitten and ordered her brought in (as was customary for any woman that caught the Duke's eye) through the back door. Herleva refused, saying she would only enter the Duke's castle on horseback through the front gate, and not as an ordinary commoner. The Duke, filled with lust, could only agree. In a few days, Herleva, dressed in the finest her father could provide, and sitting on a white horse, rode proudly through the front gate, her head held high. This gave Herleva a semi-official status as the Duke's mistress.[



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DNA
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Herleva de Falaise
Herleva de Falaise

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Shell Tile
Shell Tile

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Collaboration

On October 2, 2014 at 23:23GMT Bree Ogle wrote:

Bio fixed. Template placed at the end for scannable content, aesthetics, and to separate current data from any future merges.


On June 17, 2014 at 10:16GMT Rhian Geleick wrote:

This profile contains a word for word copy of wikipedia text which should be removed and replaced with just a link to the wikipedia entry.

See guidlines for details.


On May 15, 2014 at 08:50GMT David Rentschler wrote:

Falaise-51 and De Falaise-128 are not ready to be merged because: dates and relative names not lining up.


On February 6, 2012 at 19:13GMT Roger Travis wrote:

Hi; This profile should have white privacy. Please change it as soon as convenient, so we can carry out the expedited merges outlined here:

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Historically-significant_ancestors


On February 6, 2012 at 18:45GMT Roger Travis wrote:

Hi; This profile should have white privacy. Please change it as soon as convenient, so we can carry out the expedited merges outlined here:

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Historically-significant_ancestors


On February 6, 2012 at 18:42GMT Roger Travis wrote:

Hi; This profile should have white privacy. Please change it as soon as convenient, so we can carry out the expedited merges outlined here:

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Historically-significant_ancestors


On February 6, 2012 at 12:11GMT Roger Travis wrote:

Hi; This profile should have white privacy. Please change it as soon as convenient, so we can carry out the expedited merges outlined here:

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Historically-significant_ancestors




F  >  Falaise  |  M  >  Mortain  >  Herleva Mortain