Eva (MacMurrough) Diarmait

Eva (MacMurrough) Diarmait

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Countess Aoife Ní (Eva) "4th Countess of Pembroke" Diarmait formerly MacMurrough aka MacMurchada, de Clare
Born about in Lancaster, Lancashire, , Englandmap
Wife of — married in Waterford, Irelandmap
Died in Waterford, County Waterford, Munster, Ireland.map
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Contents

Biography

Title

Title: Countess Ireland, MacDermot, Countess of Pembroke

Alias

Alias: Aoife Ní Diarmait / Eva of Leinster

Aoife MacMurrough (1145-1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl ofPembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage.

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognized a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare, and within several generations her descendants included much of the nobility of northwestern Europe, including Robert the Bruce.

A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."

Aoife MacMurrough (1145-1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).[1]

Marriage

On the 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage.[clarification needed]

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare, and within several generations her descendants included much of the nobility of northwestern Europe, including Robert the Bruce and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall who was elected King of the Romans in 1257.[2]

Aoife is the ancestor of many Kings of England by a number of lines of descent, such as that of her granddaughter Eva Marshal, whose daughter Maude married Roger de Mortimer. They are ancestors of the Kings of England from Edward IV onwards (with the exception of Henry VII). Another line of descent is that of a daughter of Maude, Katherine Mortimer, married Thomas de Beauchamp 11th Earl of Warwick, and they were ancestors of the Earls of Warwick and also of the Edward IV and most subsequent Kings of England.

Through further lines she is the ancestor of the Scottish Kings Robert the Bruce (and his descendants) and John Balliol, and of Irish magnates such as the Earls of Kildare, Ormond and Desmond.

Note

Extract from Heart of Exile - The marriage of Strongbow (Richard de Clare) and Eva lived for centuries after in the Irish mind as a horrible alliance.

Name Birth Death Notes

Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 1172 1240 m. Aug 1189, Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, Lord Marshal, son of John Fitz Gilbert, Marshal (Marechal) of England, and Sibylla of Salisbury.
Gilbert de Striguil (Chepstow), 3rd Earl of Pembroke 1173 1185 Inherited title from father but died as a minor. The title then went to his sister's husband on marriage.
Joan de Clare 1175  ? m. Godfrey Gamage, son of William De Gamages and Elizabeth De Miners.
Children of Aoife MacMurrough and Richard de Clare (Strongbow)

Alias

Alias: Eva /MacMurrough/

Name

Name: Eva (Aoife) /MCMURROUGH/
Name: Eva (Aoife) /de CLARE/
Name: Aoife "Red Eva" /ni Diarmait/

[1]

Name: Eva /MacMURROUGH/

Sources

  1. http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6835128&pid=-1039468275

Acknowledgements

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Marriage of Eva (Aoife) and Richard de Clare
Marriage of Eva (Aoife) and Richard de Clare

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