Dugal McQueen

Dugal McQueen

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Dugal McQueen
Born in On Findhorn River, Inverness-shire, , Scotlandmap
Son of and [mother unknown]
Husband of — married in Maryland, United Statesmap
Died in Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United Statesmap
This page has been accessed 754 times.

Contents

Biography

Dugal MacQueen was born in 1690 at Moy, Invernesshire, Scotland and raised in the Highlands of Scotland. He was thought to have lived in Strathdearn at Corryborough on the Findhorn River near Inverness. Dugal and the Highlanders believed that James of the Royal House of Stuart should be the King of Great Britain, so they started the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715. On November 14, 1715 Dugal was captured at the Battle of Preston by the English, tried at Carlisle and sentenced to transportation.

Dugall McQueen, married Grace MacLean (born 1700). Dugal MCQUEEN died about 1747 in Carroll County Maryland.

On August 20, 1716 Dugal arrived at Baltimore, Maryland on the Friendship of Belfast commanded by Michael Mankin and sold into seven years indentured servitude to William Holland, Esq. His seven years of servitude should have been completed in 1723.

Death: Abt 1747 in Carroll County, Maryland Formed 1837 From Baltimore And Frederick Counties 1


[[1]]

Name

Name: Dugal /McQueen/
Source: #S-2084837787
Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 150.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1385236&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Arrival date: 1716Arrival place: Maryland
APID: 7486::1385236
Source: #S-2084837787
Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 231.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1385237&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Arrival date: 1716Arrival place: Maryland
APID: 7486::1385237
Source: #S-2084837787
Page: Place: Maryland or Virginia; Year: 1716; Page Number: 170.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1432730&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Arrival date: 1716Arrival place: Maryland or Virginia
APID: 7486::1432730
Source: #S-2083942156
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=flhg-tomarylandfromoverseas&h=111378&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Residence date: Residence place: Maryland, USA
APID: 49382::111378
Source: #S-2083943777
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=flhg-settlersmaryland2&h=102094&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Residence date: Residence place: Maryland, USA
APID: 49058::102094


Residence

Residence:
Place: Maryland, USA
Source: #S-2083943777
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=flhg-settlersmaryland2&h=102094&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Residence date: Residence place: Maryland, USA
APID: 49058::102094
Residence:
Place: Maryland, USA
Source: #S-2083942156
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=flhg-tomarylandfromoverseas&h=111378&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Residence date: Residence place: Maryland, USA
APID: 49382::111378


Event

Event:
Type: Arrival
Date: 1716
Place: Maryland or Virginia
Source: #S-2084837787
Page: Place: Maryland or Virginia; Year: 1716; Page Number: 170.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1432730&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Arrival date: 1716Arrival place: Maryland or Virginia
APID: 7486::1432730
Event:
Type: Arrival
Date: 1716
Place: Maryland
Source: #S-2084837787
Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 231.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1385237&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Arrival date: 1716Arrival place: Maryland
APID: 7486::1385237
Event:
Type: Arrival
Date: 1716
Place: Maryland
Source: #S-2084837787
Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 150.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1385236&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Arrival date: 1716Arrival place: Maryland
APID: 7486::1385236


SOURCE

[[[2]]

Name: Dugall /McQueen/[1][2]



Source: #S-899753593
Page: Ancestry Family Trees
Note:
Data:
Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=7221440&pid=774387084



Note

Note: Immigration
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=ad007fd4-1ca1-4dbd-9058-5f0a02a299b2&tid=7221440&pid=774387084
Source S-2083942156
Repository: #R-899753595
Title: To Maryland from Overseas
Author: Ancestry.com
Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - Newman, Harry Wright. To Maryland from Overseas. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2002.Original data: Newman, Harry Wright. To Maryland from Overseas. Ba
Note:
APID: 49382::0


No REPO record found with id R-899753595.


Source S-2083943777
Repository: #R-899753595
Title: Settlers of Maryland, 1679-1783. Consolidated Edition
Author: Ancestry.com
Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - Coldham, Peter Wilson. Settlers of Maryland, 1679-1783. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2002.Original data: Coldham, Peter Wilson. Settlers of Marylan
Note:
APID: 49058::0
Source S-2084837787
Repository: #R-899753595
Title: Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
Author: Gale Research
Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.Original data - Filby, P. William, ed.. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2009.Original data: Filby, P. William, ed.. Passeng
Note:
APID: 7486::0
Source S-899753593
Repository: #R-899753595
Title: Ancestry Family Trees
Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.
Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.


Event

Event:
Type: Arrival
Date: 1716
Place: Maryland[3][4]

Object

Object:
File: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=827c2fe3-4e55-4d94-aecc-f5e49daa77b1&tid=52421242&pid=755
Format: jpg
Title: Dugal McQueen (Macquain) Will
Object:
File: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=ad27147a-5181-4392-bf4b-4f8001aca87e&tid=52421242&pid=755
Format: htm
Title: Biography
Object:
File: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=c95c37da-3573-41ff-9c4a-7b4d0e0f978d&tid=52421242&pid=755
Format: htm
Title: Dugal McQueen


  1. Source: #S-1557517702 Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 31 APID: 1,7486::1385634
  2. Source: #S-1557517702 Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 150 APID: 1,7486::1385236
  3. Source: #S-1557517702 Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 31 APID: 1,7486::1385634
  4. Source: #S-1557517702 Page: Place: Maryland; Year: 1716; Page Number: 150 APID: 1,7486::1385236


In 1732 Dugal was a taxpayer in the Upper 100 of the Cliff, Calvert County, Maryland. On September 2, 1740 he received a land deed from the county court of Charles County, Maryland for seventy_two acres called Cranberry Plains located in Baltimore, County, now Carroll County near Westminster, Maryland. On March 26, 1746 Dugal signed his will in Baltimore County and it was filed in 1746. A copy can be found at the Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland, will book 25, pages 10 and 11.

The name MacQueen or Macsweyns is said to originate from several sources. The Celtic version is also given as "Macsween" or "son of Sweyn". Other possible sources include from the Gaelic Suibhne meaning "going well", from the Norse Sweyn, or from MacCuinn, "son of Conn". The MacQueens appear to be of Hebridean and West Highland origin, and were associated with Clan Donald early on. The McQueens of Moy are said to be related to Alan McDonald, chief of the clan McDonalds, who died about 1419. In 1410 his daughter Mora McDonald of Moidart married Malcom Beg Mackintosh, 10th chief of Mckintos. As was the custom, she took with her for guards certain kinsmen identified as McQueen. These Macqueen clansmen later settled in Argyll, forming a sept of Clan Chattan (Clan Catten, Clans of the Cat). Clan Chattan, a confederation of about 16 clans, were joined together in the 1500s for mutual protection. Leader of Clan Chattan was always of MacKintosh family. The clans were located in Lochaber, Strathairn, and Bodenoch, Scotland. Our branch of the clan McQueen settled in Strathdearn and acquired the lands of Corryborough. They were originally known as Clan Revan, named after Revan Macqueen, who fought under Mackintosh at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. Revan Macqueen was an ancestor to the Macqueens of Corrybrough (Lairds of Corriborough) who settled in Strathdearn. About 1600 the Clan was granted land in their own right around Moy in Inverness, which is still a McQueen stronghold, . In 1609 John McQueen in Corrybrough signed the Clan Chattan Band as chief of the McQueens. The Clan lands appear to have been lost in the late 18th century, when the chief, John Fraser died in 1881. The fortunes of the family may have failed at that point, perhaps forcing forfeiture of the lands in exchange for debts owed. The title passed to Fraser's brother's son, who was the last known chief of the clan. When he emigrated to New Zealand, it appears that the Macqueens were scattered throughout Scotland, across the Atlantic, and elsewhere into the English-speaking world. Macqueens also held the lands of Garafad, on the Isle of Skye in the Hebrides for many generations. However, if you examine the records of the 1616 & 1645, whilst some McQueens from Skye & Raasay did fight with Clan Donald, most were from Inverness district fighting with the McIntosh and McPherson Clans. Most of those who were transported after the Battle of Preston would have been under James McQueen of Corrybrough who was attached to McIntosh of Borlum's Regiment. Inverness, Morayshire and Nairn are the logical place to look for the Scottish roots of most McQueens. The records were poorly kept in those counties and some of the records have been destroyed. This history helps explain why it is unclear to which clan MacQueen actually belongs, and why MacQueen is not truly a clan unto itself. [ "Scottish Clan and Family Encyclopedia" by George Way of Plean and Romilly Squire, Glasgow: HarperCollins Publishers, 1994; Donna Hechler, Metes and Bounds, p 7, citing Frank Adam, The Clans, Septs, and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands (Scotland, Johnston & Bacon 1970) p. 271-272; Sir Robert Iaian Moncrieffe, The Highland Clans (London: Branall House) p. 134-136; "Clan MacQueen" from www.tartans.com] Dugal MacQueen was born and raised in the Highlands of Scotland. He was thought to have lived in Strathdearn at Corryborough on the Findhorn River near Inverness. He participated in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715. The rebels were the supporters of the exiled James II of England and his heirs. There were many such adherents among the Roman Catholics of Scotland, some in Ireland, and a dissident group within the Church of England. During the rebellion of 1715 the rebel forces entered Preston on November 9 and after proclaiming as their king the chevalier of St. George, remained there for several days during which the government forces advanced upon them. The Town was assaulted and on November 14 the rebel general Thomas Forster surrendered his army to the King's forces On November 14, 1715 Dugal was captured at the Battle of Preston by the English, tried at Carlisle and sentenced to transportation. On August 20, 1716 Dugal arrived at Baltimore, Maryland on the Friendship of Belfast commanded by Michael Mankin and was one of three sold into seven years indentured servitude to William Holland, Esq. His seven years of servitude should have been completed in 1723. They must have gotten along pretty good during Dugal's servitude. Dugal named some of his sons the same as William Holland's sons: Francis, William and Thomas.

Notes on the Jacobite Rebellion, Preston Capture, Transportation, and Indenture:

Indictment: James McQueen, gentlemen subject of George now King of Great Britain, France, etc., as false traitor, intending to subvert the good government of this kingdom to depose the King from his royal state and dignity, and to put him to death, and to exalt the person who, in the lifetime of James the Second, pretended to be Price of Wales, and after the decease of James the Second, took upon hinmself the title of King of England, by the name of James the Third, to the crown and government of the Kingdom, did Oct 19 2 George I at Penrith in the County of Cumberland with a great multitude of traitors and rebels, to the number of 1000 persons, in warlike array, with banners displayed, drums, etc. traitorously assemble themselves in arms and wage war against the King. Public Record Office, London (1716-1717) SP35/4,KB8/66 [Alexander McQueen Quattlebaum, Clergymen and Chiefs, a genealogy of the McQueen and McFarlane families, 1990 (Family History Library, Salt Lake City) p. 6,7 ]

All those tried under this indictment were found guilty and most were transported to the plantation, viz colonies of America, sentenced to seven years indentured servitude. Among the persons transported to the American Colonies in 1716 were 637 Scottish rebels captured at Preston, Lancashire on Nov. 14, 1715. Those who refused to be voluntarily indentured were forced into that condition upon arrival in the colonies. According to a receipt given by the commissary general of the rebel prisoners, 639 prisoners were transported. Ship Friendship from Liverpool to Maryland and Virginia May 24, 1716 with 80 prisoners: There were four McQueens on the ship. They were sold at Annapolis. Hector to Aaron Rawlings, David to Robert Gundy, Alexander to Daniel Sherwood, Dugal to William Holland who lived in Calvert Co. just below Annapolis.[Natl Genealogical Society Quarterly 64:1 March 1976 pp. 27-34]

Also listed were those prisoners who were sent to South Carolina. A list of prisoners shipped on board "Wakefield", Captian Thomas Beak commanding, for South Carolina from Liverpool on 21 April 1716 includes: Alexander McQueen, Alexander McQueen, Alexander McQueen, David McQueen, Duncan McQueen, John McQueen. Thus it is apparent that the original McQueens of South Carolina who landed at Charles Towne in 1716 were from the Moy branch of the family. John McQueen and others of the family, including Alexander McQueen and Don Juan McQueen, were prominent in the affairs of South Carolina during and after the Revolutionary War. Cites Don Juan McQueen by Eugenia Price, Philadelphia and New York: J.P. Lippencott, 1974. [also Transportation and sale of McQueens at Maryland. Hester Dorsey Richardson, Side-Lights on Maryland History, Vol 1, Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Co. 1967, 213-215; J. Thomas Scharf, History of Maryland Vol I Tradition Press 1967, pp 385-389]

p. 211-212 Proclamation issued by Governor John Hart in the year August 28, 1716: Whereas his most sacred Mahjesty (George I) out of abundant clemency has caused eighty of the rebels (most of them Scotsman lately taken at Preston in Lancashire) to be transported from Great Britain into this province in the ship, Frienship, of Belfast, Michael Mankin Commander, and signified to me his royall pleasure by one of his principal secretaries of state that the said rebells to the number aforesaid, should be sold to the assigns of the merchants, who shall purchase them for the full term of seven years and no lesser time. And that I shall cause the said rebells to enter into indentures to perform such service or otherwise grant the respective purchasers proper certificates to be recorded the better enable to detain them, lest they should at any time attempt to make their escape not being bound. It appearing to be his Majesty's pleasure, the aforesaid rebells should continue in the province for and during the whole term and space of sevean years aforesaid. And whereas the said rebells notwithstanding his majesty's clemency and pleasure signifed as aforesaid, have obstinately refused to enter into any such indentures; that the greatest part of them have already been sold, and the rest will in all probability be disposed of with such proper certificates as by his Majesty directed in order to enable to retake any who may at any time hereafter attempt to make their escape." The sheriffs, constables, magistrates, officers, and inhabitants were notified to apprehend any such fugitves "who may attempt to go out of this province to some other plantation or province where they may not be known, and consequently have the greater opportunity to return to Great Britain in order to pursue their wicked and rebellious practices and designs against his Majesty's and the Protestant succession, I do hereby, with the advice of his Lordship's councill, command the aforesaid officers, etc. to use the utmost endeavors to prevent the same by all possible didligence, etc." This proclamation was was ordered to be published in full at courthouses, churches, capesl and other most publick and frequented places in their respective counties and by fixing attested copies thereoif at all such places whereof they are not fail at their perils."

p. 212 In the British museum there is letter sent by one of these fearless rebels to his father after he had been sold in Maryland. In this he states, "The people here speak as they do in Inverness."

On William Holland: Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759 by Robert W. Barnes, Genealogical Publishing Co. p. 273 Francis Holland, a puritan from Virginia, settled in lower Anne ARundel County in the early puritan days. His son Col William Holland, together with Richard Harrison and Samuel Chew, purchased the landed estates of the Abington family in Calvert County about 1695. Col. Holland also purchased the 1100 acre plantaion of James Thompson called St. James situated in the upper county about midway between the branches of Hunting Creek and Fishing Creek. Col. Wm. Holland died in 1732 and left his plantation bought of John Abington to this son Wiliam Holland. He left St. James and parts of Aleanders Hope and Lordships Favor which he had bought of John and Aaron Cobreth to his son Thomas Holland. Both branches of the Holland family continued to live in Calvert County throughout the 18th century. Thomas Holland died about 1742 and by his will left his lands to his son Thomas Holland, Jr. The Hollands seldon held public office but were among the wealthier familes of Calvert County. Wm Holand, probably a great-grandson of Col Wm. Holland is listed in the census of 1800 as the owner of 22 slaves, a substantial holding. He lived ont he cliffs of the Patuxent River on his ancestral estates.

===========

May 27, 1725 debts paid by Dugal and Hector McQueen to estate of Robert Eade, deceased, Anne Arundel County. [Skinners Abstracts of the Prerogative Court, p. 189] July 25, 1735 debt paid by Bugail MacQueen to estate of William Holland, Esq., Anne Arundel County. [Skinners Abstracts] 1739 money owed by Dugal McQueen to estate of Col. John Smith, deceased of Calvert County. [Skinners Abstracts] Aug 1, 1741 Reamy's Records of St. Paul's Parish. Francis Macquain son of Dugal and Grace Macquain was born in St. Paul's Parrish, Baltimore County.

Dugal McQueen on the 1732-33 tax list in the Upper Hundred of the Cliffs, Calvert Co., Md. [Hechler, Metes & Bounds, p. 6; History of Calvert Co., Md., Stein, 1960]Calvert County, one of the older political sub- divisions of the state, was first settled about 1642. The county was organized in 1654 and assumed much of its present shape when Prince Georges County was split off in 1695-96. Numerous records exist for the colonial period, most being in published form, with many of the original materials in the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis. Most post-colonial records were lost when the court house burned in 1882. A minor percentage of those earlier records have been recreated in some form after that fire, and records since that date are in the court house, Prince Frederick 20678.

March 1, 1739/40 Patent for Cranberry Plains near Craberry Glade. Patented Sept 2, 1740. 72 acres EI 5-506 LG # B, Folio 183. Patent refers to Dugal as being of Prince George's County. This land was then in Baltimore Co., then Frederick County, and now Carroll County near Westminster. Hechler, Metes & Bounds, p. 6. Land was surrounded on three sides by Brown's Glade owned by George and Mary Brown. Their son John Brown married one of Dugal's daughters.

On March 26, 1746 Dugal signed his will in Baltimore County and it was proved March 4, 1746/47. A copy can be found at the Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland, will book 25, pages 10 and 11. March 26, 1746 - wife Grace MacQuaine. son-in-law John Brown, sons William, Francis, Thomas are mentioned. William and Francis to receive lands which he now lives on. William to receive his "Fear Nothing coat and my new jacket". Thomas to have all rest of clothing except his white coat which he gives to his son-in-law John Brown. Signed by his mark.

p. 441 William McQueen, son of Dugal, was in Balto. Co. by March 1761 when he surveyed 35 1/2a McQueen;s Choice; by 1796 he was in Washington Co., Pa. (207; 231-WG#VV:460) p. 441 Francis McQueen son of Dugal was born in St. Paul's Parrish, Baltimore Co. (133-66) p. 441 Thomas McQueen son of Dugal was in Baltimore Co. by Jan 22 1760 when he patented 29 acres Foxes Thicket (207)

Children of Dugal McQueen and Grace Brown are: +Thomas McQueen I, b. Abt. 1730, Baltimore Co., MD, d. 13 Nov 1763, Great Cove, Fulton Co., PA.

NOTES








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On May 31, 2014 at 13:43GMT Michelle McQueen wrote:

McQueen-105 and McQueen-511 appear to represent the same person because: Same person



M  >  McQueen  >  Dugal McQueen