Ælfgifu (Northumbria) of Mercia

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Ælfgifu "Elgiva, Aelfgifu, Edith" of Mercia formerly Northumbria aka of Northumbria
Born about in Wessex, Englandmap
Wife of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Wife of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Died [date unknown] in Mercia, Englandmap
Last profile change on 16 April 2014
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Contents

Important Notice

This profile is the result of multiple ongoing merges between entries of many family trees. Interested parties are encouraged to edit together the various text blocks into a rational whole. As an historic figure, the privacy should be open or public at all times, if it is not please ask a manager to correct it.

Family Troubles

Elgiva (Aelfgifu, etc.) of England is the mother of Edith of Mercia, born about 1020. She is not the mother of Edith the Fair (aka Edith Swan Neck), born about 1030. Both were mated to Harold of England - with the Edith of Mercia (daughter of Elgiva) lawfully wed in a marriage of convenience and Edith Swan Neck a common law wife who loved him (and who identified his corpse after the battle of Hastings).

Please do not merge the entries of the 2 Ediths.

Biography

Father: , AEthelred II the Unready, King of England, b. ABT 968 Mother: , Elfreda (AElfgifu), b. CIR 963 Married to , Uchtred of Northumbria, Earl of Northumbria

Child 1: , Ealdgyth


Birth:
Date: 1003
Place: Wessex, , , England[1][2][3][4]
Death:
Date: 1098
Place: Mercia, England[5][6][7][8]
Note: #N202
Ancestral File Number: 8XQ8-94
Name: Aelfgifu /England/
Source: #S-1707889694
Note:
Birth:
Date: 0997
Place: Wessex, England
Source: #S-1707889694
Note:
Death:
Date: 1028
Place: Mercia, England
Source: #S-1707889694
Note:
Name: Alfgifu /(elfgifu\\elgiva)/

Taking (elfgifu as the last name from (elfgifu\\elgiva). The last name (elfgifu couldn't be parsed, so used UNKNOWN instead.

Note: ref: Wikipedia (http://www. wikipedia.org) (25 Apr 10) -
Ælfgifu married ealdorman Uhtred of Northumbria.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ælfgifu (fl. c. 985-1002) was presumably a daughter of Thored, earl of southern Northumbria, and the first wife of King Æthelred (r. 978-1016), by whom she bore many offspring, including Edmund Ironside.
Her name and paternity do not surface in the sources until sometime after the Conquest. The first to offer any information at all, Sulcard of Westminster (fl. 1080s), merely describes her as being “of very noble English stock” (ex nobilioribus Anglis), without naming her,[1] while in in the early 12th century, William of Malmesbury has nothing to report. All primary evidence comes from two Anglo-Norman historians. John of Worcester, in a chronicle which is thought to rely on earlier material compiled c. 1100, tells that Æthelred's first wife was Ælfgifu, daughter of the nobleman Æthelberht (comes Agelberhtus) and the mother of Edmund, Æthelstan, Eadwig and Eadgyth.[2 ] Writing in the 1150s, Ailred of Rievaulx had reason to identify Æthelred's first wife as a daughter of earl (comes) Thored and the mother of Edmund, though he supplies no name.[3] Ailred had been seneschal at the court of King David I of Scotland (r. 1124-53), whose mother Margaret descended from King Æthelred and his first wife. Although his testimony is late, his proximity to the royal family may have given him access to genuine information.[4 ]
These two accounts are irreconcilable at the point of ascribing two different fathers to Æthelred's first wife (in both cases, Edmund's mother). One way out of it would be to assume the existence of two different wives before the arrival of Queen Emma, Æthelred's Norman wife, although this interpretation presents difficulties of its own, especially as the sources envisage a single woman.[5] Historians generally favour the view that John of Worcester was in error about the father's name, as Æthelberht's very existence is under suspicion:[6 ] if Latin comes is to be interpreted as a gloss on the office of ealdorman, only two doubtful references to one or two duces (ealdormen) of this name can be put forward that would fit the description.[7 ] All in all, the combined evidence suggests that Æthelred's first wife was Ælfgifu, the daughter of Earl Thored. This magnate is likely to have been the Thored who was a son of Gunnar and earl of (southern) Northumbria.[8 ]
[edit]Marria ge and offspring
Based largely on the careers of her sons, Ælfgifu's marriage has been dated approximately to the (mid-)980s.[9 ] Considering Thored's authority as earl of York and apparently, the tenure of that office without royal appointment, the union would have signified an important step for the West-Saxon royal family by which it secured a foothold in the north.[10] Such a politically weighty union would help explain the close connections maintained by Ælfgifu's eldest sons Edmund and Æthelstan with noble families based in the northern Danelaw.[11 ]
The marriage produced six sons, all of whom were named after Æthelred's predecessors, and an indefinite number of daughters. The eldest sons Æthelstan, Ecgberht, Eadred and Edmund first attest charters in 993, while the younger sons Eadwig and Edgar first make an appearance in them in 997 and 1001 respectively.[12 ] Some of these sons seem to have spent part of their childhood in fosterage elsewhere, possibly with Æthelred's mother Ælfthryth. [13]
The only ætheling to become king was Edmund Ironside, whose brief reign came to an end when Cnut won a series of victories and so conquered England (1016). Æthelred gave three of his daughters in marriage to ealdormen, presumably in order to secure the loyalties of his nobles and so to consolidate a defence system against Viking attacks.[14 ]
[edi t]sons
Æ thelstan (born before 993, d. 1014)
Ecgberht (born before 993, d. 1005)
Edmund (II) Ironside (born before 993, d. 1016)
Eadred (d. 1012 x 1015)
Eadwig (born before 997, exiled and killed 1017)
Edgar (born before 1001, d. 1012 x 1015)
[edit] daughters
Eadgyth (born before 993), married Eadric Streona, ealdorman of Mercia.[15 ]
Ælfgifu, married ealdorman Uhtred of Northumbria.[16 ]
(possibly) Wulfhild, who married Ulfcytel (Snillingr) (d. 1016), apparently ealdorman of East Anglia.[17 ]
possibly an unnamed daughter who married the Æthelstan who was killed fighting the Danes at the Battle of Ringmere in 1010. He is called Æthelred's aðum, meaning either son-in-law or brother-in-law.[ 18] Ann Williams, however, argues that the latter meaning is the appropriate one and refers to Æthelstan as being Ælfgifu's brother.[19 ]
possibly unnamed daughter, who became abbess of Wherwell.[20 ]
[edit] Life and death
Æ lfgifu seems to have kept a low profile in her husband's political life, to judge by her total absence from royal diplomas. She did, however, make at least some impression on the contemporary record. In a will issued between 975/980 and 987, the thegn Beorhtric and his wife bequeathed to their “lady” (hlæfdige) an armlet worth 30 gold mancuses and a stallion, calling upon her authority to oversee that the arrangements set out by will were implemented.[21 ] In a will of later date (AD 990 x 1001), in which she is addressed as “my lady” (mire hlæfdian), the noblewoman Æthelgifu promised a bequest of 30 mancuses of gold.[22] Just as little is known of Ælfgifu's life, so the precise date and circumstances of her death cannot be recovered.[23 ] In any event, she appears to have died by 1002, when Æthelred took to wife Emma, daughter of Count Richard of Rouen, who received or adopted her predecessor's Anglo-Saxon name, Ælfgifu.
[edit]Notes
^ Sulcard of Winchester, Prologus de construccione Westmonasterii, ed. Scholz, pp. 74, 89; Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 169 note.30.
^ John of Worcester, Chronicon ex Chronicis (West-Saxon regnal list at the end of Chronicle).
^ '[…] cum jam de filia Torethi nobilissimi comitis filium suscepisset Edmundum.' Ailred of Rievaulx, Genealogia regum Anglorum.
^ Keynes, “Æthelred.”
^ This possibility is raised, for instance, by Stafford, Queen Emma, p. 66 and 66 note 3. It is also considered, but subsequently rejected by Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 25.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 25; Keynes, “Æthelred”; Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ His name is only attested for an ealdorman (dux) on the witness lists for two spurious royal charters relating to grants in Tavistock and Exeter. S 838 (AD 981) and S 954 (AD 1019). The latter subscription may be an error for Æthelweard; see Williams, Æthelready the Unready. p. 169 note 29.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24-5.
^ Keynes, “Æthelred”; Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 25.
^ S 876 (AD 993), S 891 (AD 997), S 899 (AD 1001).
^ Keynes, “Æthelred”
^ Stafford, “The Reign of Æthelred II.” 34-5.
^ John of Worcester, Chronicon, AD 1009.
^ De Obsessione Dunelmi § 2; Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24.
^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (MS E) 1048; Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ S 1511 (975 or 980 x 987).
^ S 1497 (c. AD 990x 1001).
^ It has been suggested that she died at giving birth. Trow, Cnut: Emperor of the North, p. 54.
[edit]Sourc es[edit] Primary sources
John of Worcester, Chronicon ex Chronicis, ed. Benjamin Thorpe, Florentii Wigorniensis monachi chronicon ex chronicis. 2 vols. London, 1848-9; tr. J. Stevenson, Church Historians of England. 8 vols.: vol. 2.1. London, 1855. 171-372.
Ailred of Rievaulx, De genealogia regum Anglorum ("On the Genealogy of the English Kings"), ed. R. Twysden, De genealogia regum Anglorum. Rerum Anglicarum scriptores 10. London, 1652. 1.347-70. Patrologia Latina 195 (711-38) edition available from Documenta Catholica; tr. M. L. Dutton and J. P. Freeland, Aelred of Rievaulx, The Historical Works. Kalamazoo, 2005.
William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum Anglorum, ed. and tr. R.A.B. Mynors, R. M. Thomson and M. Winterbottom, William of Malmesbury. Gesta Regum Anglorum. The History of the English Kings. OMT. 2 vols: vol 1. Oxford, 1998.
Sulcard of Westminster, Prologus de construccione Westmonasterii, ed. B.W. Scholz, “Sulcard of Westminster. Prologus de construccione Westmonasterii.” Traditio 20 (1964): 59-91.
Anglo-Saxon charters
S 1511 (possibly AD 980 x 987)
S 1497 (c. AD 990 x 1001)
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, ed. D. Dumville and S. Keynes, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. A Collaborative Edition. 8 vols. Cambridge, 1983; tr. Michael J. Swanton, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles. 2nd ed. London, 2000.
[edit] Secondary sources
Fryde, E. et al. Handbook of British Chronology. 3d ed. Cambridge, 1996.
Keynes, Simon. “Æthelred II (c.966x8-1016).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press, 200.4 Accessed 1 Sept 2007.
Stafford, Pauline. "The Reign of Æthelred II. A Study in the Limitations on Royal Policy and Action." In Ethelred the Unready. Papers from the Millenary Conference, ed. D. Hill. BAR British series 59. Oxford, 1978. 15-46.
Stafford, Pauline. Queen Emma and Queen Edith: Queenship and Women’s Power in Eleventh-Century England. Oxford, 1997.
Trow, M.J. Cnut: Emperor of the North. Sutton, 2005.
Williams, Ann. Æthelred the Unready: The Ill-Counselled King. London, 2003.
Preceded by
ÆlfthrythQueen Consort of England
980s - 1002Succeeded by
Emma of Normandy
Categories: 10th-century English people | 11th-century English people | Anglo-Saxon royal consorts
Ælfgifu of York
, Wikipedia
Ælfgifu of York
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Æ lfgifu (fl. c. 985-1002) was presumably a daughter of Thored, earl of southern Northumbria, and the first wife of King Æthelred (r. 978-1016), by whom she bore many offspring, including Edmund Ironside.
Contents [hide]
1 Identity and background
2 Marriage and offspring
2.1 sons
2.2 d aughters
3 Life and death
4 Notes
5 Sources
5.1 Primary sources
5.2 Secondary sources
[edit] Identity and background
Her name and paternity do not surface in the sources until sometime after the Conquest. The first to offer any information at all, Sulcard of Westminster (fl. 1080s), merely describes her as being “of very noble English stock” (ex nobilioribus Anglis), without naming her,[1] while in in the early 12th century, William of Malmesbury has nothing to report. All primary evidence comes from two Anglo-Norman historians. John of Worcester, in a chronicle which is thought to rely on earlier material compiled c. 1100, tells that Æthelred's first wife was Ælfgifu, daughter of the nobleman Æthelberht (comes Agelberhtus) and the mother of Edmund, Æthelstan, Eadwig and Eadgyth.[2 ] Writing in the 1150s, Ailred of Rievaulx had reason to identify Æthelred's first wife as a daughter of earl (comes) Thored and the mother of Edmund, though he supplies no name.[3] Ailred had been seneschal at the court of King David I of Scotland (r. 1124-53), whose mother Margaret descended from King Æthelred and his first wife. Although his testimony is late, his proximity to the royal family may have given him access to genuine information.[4 ]
These two accounts are irreconcilable at the point of ascribing two different fathers to Æthelred's first wife (in both cases, Edmund's mother). One way out of it would be to assume the existence of two different wives before the arrival of Queen Emma, Æthelred's Norman wife, although this interpretation presents difficulties of its own, especially as the sources envisage a single woman.[5] Historians generally favour the view that John of Worcester was in error about the father's name, as Æthelberht's very existence is under suspicion:[6 ] if Latin comes is to be interpreted as a gloss on the office of ealdorman, only two doubtful references to one or two duces (ealdormen) of this name can be put forward that would fit the description.[7 ] All in all, the combined evidence suggests that Æthelred's first wife was Ælfgifu, the daughter of Earl Thored. This magnate is likely to have been the Thored who was a son of Gunnar and earl of (southern) Northumbria.[8 ]
[edit]Marria ge and offspring
Based largely on the careers of her sons, Ælfgifu's marriage has been dated approximately to the (mid-)980s.[9 ] Considering Thored's authority as earl of York and apparently, the tenure of that office without royal appointment, the union would have signified an important step for the West-Saxon royal family by which it secured a foothold in the north.[10] Such a politically weighty union would help explain the close connections maintained by Ælfgifu's eldest sons Edmund and Æthelstan with noble families based in the northern Danelaw.[11 ]
The marriage produced six sons, all of whom were named after Æthelred's predecessors, and an indefinite number of daughters. The eldest sons Æthelstan, Ecgberht, Eadred and Edmund first attest charters in 993, while the younger sons Eadwig and Edgar first make an appearance in them in 997 and 1001 respectively.[12 ] Some of these sons seem to have spent part of their childhood in fosterage elsewhere, possibly with Æthelred's mother Ælfthryth. [13]
The only ætheling to become king was Edmund Ironside, whose brief reign came to an end when Cnut won a series of victories and so conquered England (1016). Æthelred gave three of his daughters in marriage to ealdormen, presumably in order to secure the loyalties of his nobles and so to consolidate a defence system against Viking attacks.[14 ]
[edi t]sons
Æ thelstan (born before 993, d. 1014)
Ecgberht (born before 993, d. 1005)
Edmund (II) Ironside (born before 993, d. 1016)
Eadred (d. 1012 x 1015)
Eadwig (born before 997, exiled and killed 1017)
Edgar (born before 1001, d. 1012 x 1015)
[edit] daughters
Eadgyth (born before 993), married Eadric Streona, ealdorman of Mercia.[15 ]
Ælfgifu, married ealdorman Uhtred of Northumbria.[16 ]
(possibly) Wulfhild, who married Ulfcytel (Snillingr) (d. 1016), apparently ealdorman of East Anglia.[17 ]
possibly an unnamed daughter who married the Æthelstan who was killed fighting the Danes at the Battle of Ringmere in 1010. He is called Æthelred's aðum, meaning either son-in-law or brother-in-law.[ 18] Ann Williams, however, argues that the latter meaning is the appropriate one and refers to Æthelstan as being Ælfgifu's brother.[19 ]
possibly unnamed daughter, who became abbess of Wherwell.[20 ]
[edit] Life and death
Æ lfgifu seems to have kept a low profile in her husband's political life, to judge by her total absence from royal diplomas. She did, however, make at least some impression on the contemporary record. In a will issued between 975/980 and 987, the thegn Beorhtric and his wife bequeathed to their “lady” (hlæfdige) an armlet worth 30 gold mancuses and a stallion, calling upon her authority to oversee that the arrangements set out by will were implemented.[21 ] In a will of later date (AD 990 x 1001), in which she is addressed as “my lady” (mire hlæfdian), the noblewoman Æthelgifu promised a bequest of 30 mancuses of gold.[22] Just as little is known of Ælfgifu's life, so the precise date and circumstances of her death cannot be recovered.[23 ] In any event, she appears to have died by 1002, when Æthelred took to wife Emma, daughter of Count Richard of Rouen, who received or adopted her predecessor's Anglo-Saxon name, Ælfgifu.
[edit]Notes
^ Sulcard of Winchester, Prologus de construccione Westmonasterii, ed. Scholz, pp. 74, 89; Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 169 note.30.
^ John of Worcester, Chronicon ex Chronicis (West-Saxon regnal list at the end of Chronicle).
^ '[…] cum jam de filia Torethi nobilissimi comitis filium suscepisset Edmundum.' Ailred of Rievaulx, Genealogia regum Anglorum.
^ Keynes, “Æthelred.”
^ This possibility is raised, for instance, by Stafford, Queen Emma, p. 66 and 66 note 3. It is also considered, but subsequently rejected by Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 25.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 25; Keynes, “Æthelred”; Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ His name is only attested for an ealdorman (dux) on the witness lists for two spurious royal charters relating to grants in Tavistock and Exeter. S 838 (AD 981) and S 954 (AD 1019). The latter subscription may be an error for Æthelweard; see Williams, Æthelready the Unready. p. 169 note 29.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24-5.
^ Keynes, “Æthelred”; Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 25.
^ S 876 (AD 993), S 891 (AD 997), S 899 (AD 1001).
^ Keynes, “Æthelred”
^ Stafford, “The Reign of Æthelred II.” 34-5.
^ John of Worcester, Chronicon, AD 1009.
^ De Obsessione Dunelmi § 2; Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ Williams, Æthelred the Unready, p. 24.
^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (MS E) 1048; Handbook of British Chronology, p. 27.
^ S 1511 (975 or 980 x 987).
^ S 1497 (c. AD 990x 1001).
^ It has been suggested that she died at giving birth. Trow, Cnut: Emperor of the North, p. 54.
[edit]Sourc es[edit] Primary sources
John of Worcester, Chronicon ex Chronicis, ed. Benjamin Thorpe, Florentii Wigorniensis monachi chronicon ex chronicis. 2 vols. London, 1848-9; tr. J. Stevenson, Church Historians of England. 8 vols.: vol. 2.1. London, 1855. 171-372.
Ailred of Rievaulx, De genealogia regum Anglorum ("On the Genealogy of the English Kings"), ed. R. Twysden, De genealogia regum Anglorum. Rerum Anglicarum scriptores 10. London, 1652. 1.347-70. Patrologia Latina 195 (711-38) edition available from Documenta Catholica; tr. M. L. Dutton and J. P. Freeland, Aelred of Rievaulx, The Historical Works. Kalamazoo, 2005.
William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum Anglorum, ed. and tr. R.A.B. Mynors, R. M. Thomson and M. Winterbottom, William of Malmesbury. Gesta Regum Anglorum. The History of the English Kings. OMT. 2 vols: vol 1. Oxford, 1998.
Sulcard of Westminster, Prologus de construccione Westmonasterii, ed. B.W. Scholz, “Sulcard of Westminster. Prologus de construccione Westmonasterii.” Traditio 20 (1964): 59-91.
Anglo-Saxon charters
S 1511 (possibly AD 980 x 987)
S 1497 (c. AD 990 x 1001)
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, ed. D. Dumville and S. Keynes, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. A Collaborative Edition. 8 vols. Cambridge, 1983; tr. Michael J. Swanton, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles. 2nd ed. London, 2000.
[edit] Secondary sources
Fryde, E. et al. Handbook of British Chronology. 3d ed. Cambridge, 1996.
Keynes, Simon. “Æthelred II (c.966x8-1016).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press, 200.4 Accessed 1 Sept 2007.
Stafford, Pauline. "The Reign of Æthelred II. A Study in the Limitations on Royal Policy and Action." In Ethelred the Unready. Papers from the Millenary Conference, ed. D. Hill. BAR British series 59. Oxford, 1978. 15-46.
Stafford, Pauline. Queen Emma and Queen Edith: Queenship and Women’s Power in Eleventh-Century England. Oxford, 1997.
Trow, M.J. Cnut: Emperor of the North. Sutton, 2005.
Williams, Ann. Æthelred the Unready: The Ill-Counselled King. London, 2003.
Preceded by
ÆlfthrythQueen Consort of England
980s - 1002Succeeded by
Emma of Normandy
Categories: 10th-century English people | 11th-century English people | Anglo-Saxon royal consorts
Aelfgifu...Mother of many
Aelfgifu's life shows one fact of women's existence in the tenth century: little is known of her besides her name. The first wife of Ethelred "the Unready" (from Unraed meaning "bad or evil counsel"), her parentage is disputed and she disappears from the record early in his long conflict with the Danes which resulted in the overthrow of Ethelred for Sweyn in 1013, and his subsequent brief return to control 1014-1016.
While the facts aren't known for certain, Aelfgifu is usually credited as the mother of Aethelred's six sons and as many as five daughters, one of whom was the abbess at Wherwell. Aelfgifu was thus probably the mother of Ethelred's son Edmund II Ironside, who ruled briefly until Sweyn's son, Canute, defeated him in battle.
Edmund was allowed by the treaty to rule in Wessex and Canute ruled the rest of England, but Edmund died in the same year, 1016, and Canute consolidated his power, marrying Ethelred's second wife and widow, Emma. Emma was the mother of Ethelred's sons Edward and Alfred and daughter Godgifu. These three fled to Normandy where Emma's brother ruled as Duke.
Another Aelfgifu is mentioned as the first wife of Canute I, mother of Canute's sons Sweyn and Harold Harefoot.

Marriage

Husband: Aelfgar Earl Demercia
Wife: Princess Elfgifu 'Aelfgifu Elgiva' England And Wessex
Child: Countess Lucia Demercia
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Marriage:
Date: 23 JUL 1033
Place: Mercia, England[9]


Sources

  1. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Countess Lucia DeMercia 2
  2. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Aelfgar "Alfgar" III "The Saxon" Earl DeMercia
  3. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Queen Elfgifu " Elgiva" of England of Wessex
  4. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Elfgifu Aelfgifu Elgiva, Princess of England and Wessex
  5. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Aelfgar "Alfgar" III "The Saxon" Earl DeMercia
  6. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Countess Lucia DeMercia 2
  7. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Queen Elfgifu " Elgiva" of England of Wessex
  8. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Elfgifu Aelfgifu Elgiva, Princess of England and Wessex
  9. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Aelfgar "Alfgar" III "The Saxon" Earl DeMercia

See also:



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Memories

On January 31, 2012 Paul Lee wrote:

Ælfgifu, or Elgiva, was the third wife of Uchtred of Northumbria

daughter of Æthelred II Unræd, King of England & his first wife Ælflæd

Two children, both daughters, both born 1016 or earlier:

1. Ealdgyth (Ælfgifa) who married Maldred MacCrínán

2. (nameless) mother of Siward and Ealdred

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#AelfgifuMUhtredNorthumbria

m thirdly ([1009/16]) ÆLFGIFU, daughter of ÆTHELRED II King of England & his first wife Ælflæd ---. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records the third marriage of "Cospatric's son…Ucthred" (although from the context "Cospatric" appears to be an error for "Waltheof") and "king Ethelred…his…daughter Elfgiva"[333]. She is named as daughter of King Æthelred by Roger of Hoveden, when he records her marriage[334]. Her marriage date is estimated on the assumption that it is unlikely that she would have been married before her older sister Eadgyth.

Earl Uhtred & his third wife had [two children]:

4. EALDGYTH [Ælfgifu] (1016 or before-). Simeon of Durham names "Algiva daughter of earl Uchtred [and] of Algiva daughter of king Agelred" when recording that her father arranged her marriage to "Maldred the son of Crinan"[367], although her father was long since dead when she married. She is named as daughter of Uhtred and Elgiva by Roger of Hoveden, who also names her husband and his father[368]. m ([before 1040]) MALDRED Lord of Allerdale, Regent of Strathclyde, son of CRINAN "the Thane" Mormaer of Atholl [Scotland] & his wife Bethoc of Scotland Lady of Atholl (-[killed in battle 1045]).

5. [daughter (1016 or before-). Her parentage has not been confirmed by primary sources. However, her husband is named as the father of Siward and Ealdred by Orderic Vitalis[369], the brothers being described as "pronepotes" of King Edward "the Confessor". Assuming this relationship is correctly translated as great-nephew, their father would have been either the king's nephew or married to the king's niece. If Æthelgar had been the king's blood relation, it is likely that he would have been referred to in other contemporary sources which appears not to have been the case. It is therefore more probable that it was Æthelgar's wife who was related to the king, a relationship through Ælfgifu daughter of King Æthelred II being the most likely possibility given the lack of information on descendants of any of the other daughters of King Æthelred.] m ÆTHELGAR (-before 1066). It is assumed that he had recently predeceased his sons in early 1067 when they "made peace with [King] William"[370]. If Æthelgar had been alive at the time, he would presumably have "made peace" himself and noted as such by Orderic Vitalis. If he had been long dead, it is unlikely that he would have been specifically named as father of the two brothers. Æthelgar & his wife had two children:

a) SIWARD (-after 1067). He and his brother were described as "pronepotes" of King Edward ["the Confessor"] by Orderic Vitalis, being among the men who "made peace with [King] William" in [early 1067][371]. There is no further indication about their precise relationship to the king. Presumably they were grandsons of one of his half-sisters. The name Ealdred suggests a connection with the family of the Earls of Northumbria, while Siward suggests a Danish connection.

b) EALDRED (-after 1067). He and his brother were described as "pronepotes" of King Edward ["the Confessor"] by Orderic Vitalis, being among the men who "made peace with [King] William" in [early 1067][372].

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#EaldgythNorthumbriaMMaldredAllerdale


•Ælfgifu Princess of England

born about 0997 Wessex, England

father:

•Æthelred II "The Redeless" King of England

born 0968

died 23 April 1016 London, England

mother:

•Ælfgifu (Aelflaed) Queen of England

born Abt 0968 Of, Wessex, England

married Abt 0985 Of Wessex, England

siblings:

•Edmund II "Ironside" King of England born about 0988 Wessex, England

died 30 November 1016 London, Middlesex, England buried Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England

Æthelstan Prince of England born about 0986 Wessex, England died 1016 England

Egbert Prince of England born about 0987 Wessex, England died about 1005 England

Edred Prince of England born about 0990 Wessex, England

Edwig Prince of England born about 0991 Wessex, England died 1017 England

Edward Prince of England born about 0992 Wessex, England

Edgar Prince of England born about 0994 Wessex, England

Edith Princess of England born about 0995 Wessex, England

Wulfhild Princess of England born about 0998 Wessex, England

Miss Princess of England born about 1000 Wessex, England

Miss Ethelred of England born about 1001 Wherewell, Hampshire, England

spouse (1st):

•Ughtred Ealdorman of Northumbria

born about 0971 Northumbria, England

died 1016?

children (from 1st marriage):

•Ealdgyth (Aglithia) Princess of Northumberland

born about 1020? Northumberland, England

spouse (2nd):

•Ælfgar III Earl of Mercia

born about 1002 Mercia, England

died 1059 Mercia, England

buried Coventry, Warwickshire, England

children (from 2nd marriage):

Burhheard of Mercia born about 1030 Mercia, England

•Lucia of Mercia born about 1040 Mercia, England died England buried Spalding, Lincoln, England

•Ealdgyth Queen of England born about 1034 Mercia, England

died after 1086

Leverunia born <1034 Mercia, England>

Edwin Earl of Mercia born about 1028 Mercia, England died after 1070 England

Morcar Earl of Northumbria born about 1030 Mercia, England died after 1070 England

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:

LDS

http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/w/o/o/Carolyn-E-Wood/GENE2-0039.html

2696944766. Morcar, died Unknown. He was the son of 5393889532. Eargrim. He married 2696944767. Ealdgyth (Edith).

2696944767. Ealdgyth (Edith), died Unknown. She was the daughter of 5393889535. AElfthryth of Tamworth. l -------------------- Ælfgifu of Wessex married Uhtred "the Bold", Earl of Northumbria, son of Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria, before 1015.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p62.htm#i7943 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )




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