Athanaric (Of The Visigoths) Visigoths

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Atanarico II (Athanaric) "Aþanareiks II Balthes" Visigoths formerly Of The Visigoths
Born in Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spainmap
Brother of
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married in ,,,Spainmap
Died in Istanbul, Turkeymap
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Contents

Biography

This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

Name

Name: .king Athanaric /OF THE VISIGOTHS/[1][2]

Birth

Birth:
Date: 318
Place: Toledo, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain[3][4]
Birth:
Date: 318
Place: Toledo, Visigothic Empire, Spain[5]
Birth:
Date: 324
Place: Spain[6]

Found multiple copies of BIRT DATE. Using 318

Death

Death:
Date: 25 JAN 395
Place: Istanbul, Turkey[7][8]
Death:
Date: 25 JAN 380
Place: Byzantium, Istanbul, Turkey[9]
Death:
Date: 25 JAN 395
Place: Byzantium, Istanbul, Turkey[10]
Death:
Date: 395[11]

Found multiple copies of DEAT DATE. Using 25 JAN 395Array

Note

Note: #N306

Sources

  • WikiTree profile Of The Visigoths-24 created through the import of Ancestor's that we lost, the Decendants they left behind_2011-08-28_01 (2).ged on Sep 12, 2011 by Willette Bryant. See the The Visigoths-24 Changes page for the details of edits by Willette and others.
  • Source: S1 Author: Ancestry.com Title: Public Member Trees Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006; Repository: #R1
  • Repository: R1 Name: www.ancestry.com Address: E-Mail Address: Phone Number:

Notes

Note N306Athanaric, King of the West Goths
Athanaric From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Learn more about using Wikipedia for research •
Jump to: navigation, search
Athanaricus[1] (died 381) was king of several branches of the Thervings for at least two decades in the fourth century. Ironically, his Gothic name, Athanareiks, means "king for the year".
A rival of Fritigern, another Therving war chief, Athanaric made his first appearance in recorded history in 369, when he engaged in battle with the Eastern Roman Emperor Valens and ultimately negotiated a favorable peace for his people.
During his reign, the Thervings were divided by religious issues. Many of them had converted to Arian Christianity during the third and fourth centuries, but Athanaric continued to follow the old Germanic pagan religion. Fritigern, his rival, was an Arian and had the favor of Valens, who shared his religious beliefs.[citation needed]
Contents [hide]
1 Athanaric against Fritigern?
2 Athanaric in Caucaland
3 Athanaric in the Roman Empire
4 References
//
[edit] Athanaric against Fritigern?
Socrates Scholasticus, Sozomen, and Zosimus refer to conflicts between Fritigern and Athanaric.[2][3][4] Ammianus Marcellinus and Philostorgius do not record such conflicts.
According to Socrates, Fritigern and Athanaric were rival leaders of the (Therving) Goths. As this rivalry grew into warfare, Athanaric gained the advantage, and Fritigern asked for Roman aid. The Emperor Valens and the Thracian field army intervened, Valens and Fritigern defeated Athanaric, and Fritigern converted to Christianity, following the same teachings as Valens followed.[5] Sozomen follows Socrates' account.[6]
According to Zosimus, Athanaric (Athomaricus) was the king of the Goths (Scythians). Sometime after their victory at Adrianople, and after the accession of Theodosius, Fritigern, Alatheus, and Saphrax moved north of the Danube and defeated Athanaric, before returning south of the Danube.[7]
[edit] Athanaric in Caucaland
In 376, Valens permitted Fritigern's people to cross the Danube River and settle on Roman soil to avoid the Huns, who had recently conquered the Greuthungs and were now pressing the Thervings then living in Dacia. Athanaric's people were left to their fate, but many of them found their own way across the river, as well.[citation needed]
[edit] Athanaric in the Roman Empire
By 379, one year after Fritigern's great victory over the Romans at the Battle of Adrianople in 378, he had won over most of the Thervings to his leadership. But he died a year later, and Athanaric became king of the entire Therving people.[8]
Shortly before his death in 381, he became the first foreign king to visit the new Roman capital of Constantinople. He negotiated a peace with the new emperor, Theodosius I, that made some Thervings foederati, or official allies of Rome allowed to settle on Roman soil as a state within a state.[9]
A few weeks later, Athanaric died, but the treaty he had brokered stood until Theodosius' death in 395.
[edit] References
^ Latinized form, probably from Gothic Aþanareiks ("year-king").
^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 4, chapter 33.
^ Sozomen, Church History, book 6, chapter 37.
^ Zosimus, Historia Nova, book 4.
^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 4, chapter 33.
^ Sozomen, Church History, book 6, chapter 37.
^ Zosimus, Historia Nova, book 4.
^ Jordanes. History of the Goths in Geary, Patrick J. Readings in Medieval History. (Orchard Park: Broadview Press, 2003) p. 95
^ Joranes. History of the Goths p. 95
Regnal titles Preceded by
unknown King of the Visigoths
365 - 381 Vacant
Title next held by
Alaric I
Athanaric
VISIGOTHS - ATHANARIC
Athanaric, Athanaricus (died 381) was king of several branches of the Thervings for at least two decades in the fourth century. Ironically, his Gothic name, Athanareiks, means "king for the year".
A rival of Fritigern, another Therving war chief, Athanaric made his first appearance in recorded history in 369, when he engaged in battle with the Eastern Roman Emperor Valens and ultimately negotiated a favorable peace for his people.
During his reign, the Thervings were divided by religious issues. Many of them had converted to Arian Christianity during the third and fourth centuries, but Athanaric continued to follow the old Germanic pagan religion. Fritigern, his rival, was an Arian and had the favor of Valens, who shared his religious beliefs.
Athanaric and Fritigern
Socrates Scholasticus, Sozomen, and Zosimus refer to conflicts between Fritigern and Athanaric. Ammianus Marcellinus and Philostorgius do not record such conflicts.
According to Socrates, Fritigern and Athanaric were rival leaders of the (Therving) Goths. As this rivalry grew into warfare, Athanaric gained the advantage, and Fritigern asked for Roman aid. The Emperor Valens and the Thracian field army intervened, Valens and Fritigern defeated Athanaric, and Fritigern converted to Christianity, following the same teachings as Valens followed. Sozomen follows Socrates' account.
According to Zosimus, Athanaric (Athomaricus) was the king of the Goths (Scythians). Sometime after their victory at Adrianople, and after the accession of Theodosius, Fritigern, Alatheus, and Saphrax moved north of the Danube and defeated Athanaric, before returning south of the Danube.
Athanaric in Caucaland
In 376, Valens permitted Fritigern's people to cross the Danube River and settle on Roman soil to avoid the Huns, who had recently conquered the Greuthungs and were now pressing the Thervings then living in Dacia. Athanaric's people were left to their fate, but many of them found their own way across the river, as well.
Athanaric in the Roman Empire
By 379, one year after Fritigern's great victory over the Romans at the Battle of Adrianople in 378, he had won over most of the Thervings to his leadership. But he died a year later, and Athanaric became king of the entire Therving people.[citation needed]
Shortly before his death in 381, he became the first foreign king to visit the new Roman capital of Constantinople. He negotiated a peace with the new emperor, Theodosius I, that made some Thervings foederati, or official allies of Rome allowed to settle on Roman soil as a state within a state.
A few weeks later, Athanaric died, but the treaty he had brokered stood until Theodosius' death in 395.
Preceded by: none
King of the Visigoths
<365-381Title next held by
Alaric I (from 395)
TOP
References:
Latinized form, probably from Gothic Aþanareiks ("year-king").
^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 4, chapter 33.
Tid Bits
Athanaric
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Athanaricus[1] (died 381) was king of several branches of the Thervings for at least two decades in the fourth century. His Gothic name, Athanareiks, means "king and athans "edel" s. *athal;athal "edel" s. *othal; s. germ."EDEL-KING" ".
A rival of Fritigern, another Therving war chief, Athanaric made his first appearance in recorded history in 369, when he engaged in battle with the Eastern Roman Emperor Valens and ultimately negotiated a favorable peace for his people.
During his reign, the Thervings were divided by religious issues. Many of them had converted to Arian Christianity during the third and fourth centuries, but Athanaric continued to follow the old Germanic pagan religion. Fritigern, his rival, was an Arian and had the favor of Valens, who shared his religious beliefs.[citation needed]
Contents[hide]
1 Athanaric against Fritigern?
2 Athanaric in Caucaland
3 Athanaric in the Roman Empire
4 References
[edit] Athanaric against Fritigern?
Socrates Scholasticus, Sozomen, and Zosimus refer to conflicts between Fritigern and Athanaric.[2][3] [4] Ammianus Marcellinus and Philostorgius do not record such conflicts.
According to Socrates, Fritigern and Athanaric were rival leaders of the (Therving) Goths. As this rivalry grew into warfare, Athanaric gained the advantage, and Fritigern asked for Roman aid. The Emperor Valens and the Thracian field army intervened, Valens and Fritigern defeated Athanaric, and Fritigern converted to Christianity, following the same teachings as Valens followed.[5] Sozomen follows Socrates' account.[6]
According to Zosimus, Athanaric (Athomaricus) was the king of the Goths (Scythians). Sometime after their victory at Adrianople, and after the accession of Theodosius, Fritigern, Alatheus, and Saphrax moved north of the Danube and defeated Athanaric, before returning south of the Danube.[7]
[edit] Athanaric in Caucaland
In 376, Valens permitted Fritigern's people to cross the Danube River and settle on Roman soil to avoid the Huns, who had recently conquered the Greuthungs and were now pressing the Thervings then living in Dacia. Athanaric's people were left to their fate, but many of them found their own way across the river, as well.[citation needed]
[edit] Athanaric in the Roman Empire
By 379, one year after Fritigern's great victory over the Romans at the Battle of Adrianople in 378, he had won over most of the Thervings to his leadership. But he died a year later, and Athanaric became king of the entire Therving people.[8]
Shortly before his death in 381, he became the first foreign king to visit the new Roman capital of Constantinople. He negotiated a peace with the new emperor, Theodosius I, that made some Thervings foederati, or official allies of Rome allowed to settle on Roman soil as a state within a state.[9]
A few weeks later, Athanaric died, but the treaty he had brokered stood until Theodosius' death in 395.
  1. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for .King Athanaric of The Visigoths
  2. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  3. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  4. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for .King Athanaric of The Visigoths
  5. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  6. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  7. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  8. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for .King Athanaric of The Visigoths
  9. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  10. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  11. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths



Biography

He was the most powerful of the three "judges" leading the three groups of Visigoths at the end of their time in Dacia. He fiercely persecuted the christians in Dacia (364-376). Because of that he engaged in a civil war against his rival "judge" Fritigern. Eventually he was defeated by the huns after which he fled to the Transylvanian mountains. In 381 he was received in Constantinople by the roman emperor Theodosius I with royal honours. However, he died two weeks later. Meaning of Athanaric: "powerful ruler". -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athanaric --------------------[12]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for .King Athanaric of The Visigoths
  2. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  3. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  4. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for .King Athanaric of The Visigoths
  5. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  6. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  7. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  8. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for .King Athanaric of The Visigoths
  9. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  10. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  11. Source: #S1 Page: Database online. Data: Text: Record for Alaric I Balthas Of Visigoths
  12. Entered by Stephen Bridges.

Acknowledgments

Thanks to Stephen Bridges for starting this profile. Click the Changes tab for the details of contributions by Stephen and others.


This person was created on 12 September 2010 through the import of 104-B.ged.


This person was created on 19 April 2011 through the import of Stout - Trask - Cowan .ged.



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