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John Perry

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John Perry
Born about [location unknown]
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [location unknown]
Died [date unknown] [location unknown]
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Contents

Biography

This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

Name

Name: John /Perry/
Source:
Page: Birth year: 1746; Birth city: ; Birth state: PA.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepool&h=4576273&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Birth date: 1746Birth place: PADeath date: 1 March 1824Death place: PA
APID: 1,4725::4576273[1][2][3]

Birth

Birth:
Date: 1746
Place: Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA
Source:
Page: Birth year: 1746; Birth city: ; Birth state: PA.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepool&h=4576273&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Birth date: 1746Birth place: PADeath date: 1 March 1824Death place: PA
APID: 1,4725::4576273[4][5]

Death

Death:
Date: 1 Mar 1824
Place: Potosi, Washington, Missouri, United States
Source:
Page: Birth year: 1746; Birth city: ; Birth state: PA.
Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepool&h=4576273&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
Note:
Data:
Text: Birth date: 1746Birth place: PADeath date: 1 March 1824Death place: PA
APID: 1,4725::4576273[6][7]
Death:
Date: 1 Mar 1824
Place: Louisiana, United States[8]

Found multiple copies of DEAT DATE. Using 1 Mar 1824Array

Property

Property: received a grant for 1,000 acres; He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250
Date: 1777
Place: Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure[9]
Property: land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt; purached from Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts
Date: 2 April 1770
Place: West-Moreland County, PA, USA[10]
Property: 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. "District of Manchac" In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel.
Date: 1775
Place: Bayou Castang, Louisiana. US[11]

Event

Event: he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory
Type: Departure
Date: 1774
Place: Pennsylvania, United States[12]

Residence

Residence:
Date: 1775-1783
Place: Franklin, Pennsylvania, USA[13]

Note

Note: Pittsburgh Post Office Letter
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=c23dcecd-e919-4baa-9a2c-2ef3ba4ea9af&tid=25077127&pid=58
Note: His Life
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=e65186b3-3100-485c-b6c6-380f7e2fa76b&tid=25077127&pid=58
Note: land
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=22dbde52-a2d5-45e8-a047-4f9d82cf6a8d&tid=25077127&pid=58
Note: John's Life (Facts and Fiction)
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=7da65091-01ac-4230-9419-68d550e72e5b&tid=25077127&pid=58
Note: Deed
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=c029267b-7720-4527-b929-8dc9011ad75c&tid=25077127&pid=58
Note: Annis Watson Perry
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=45b4ed33-61bf-4116-8a78-e137213a762d&tid=25077127&pid=58
Note: Saw Mill
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=fc275cbc-f675-4b2f-b483-ec361e4fdb05&tid=25077127&pid=58

Marriage

Husband: John Perry
Wife: Violette Moore
Child: Mary Perry
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Isabella Perry
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Samuel Perry
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: William Moor(e) Perry
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Marriage:
Date: ABT 1778
Place: Franklin County, Pennsylvania[14][15][16]

Sources

  • WikiTree profile Perry-1668 created through the import of PERRY Family Tree 9-29-11.ged on Sep 29, 2011 by Lisa Perry. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Lisa and others.
  • Source: S-2075918444 Repository: #R-2141469169 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Trees Note: Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=25077127&pid=58
  • Repository: R-2141469169 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Note:
  • Source: S-2079074900 Repository: #R-2141469169 Title: American Revolutionary soldiers of Franklin County, Pennnsylvania [sic] Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Fendrick, Virginia Shannon.. American Revolutionary soldiers of Franklin County, Pennnsylvania [sic]. Chambersburg, Pa.: Historical Works Committee of the Franklin County Cha Note: APID: 1,14528::0
  • Source: S-2086554916 Title: FamilyTreeMaker online Author: Marsha George Richeson Publication: genealogy.com Note:
  1. Source: #S-2079074900 Page: Soldiers of Franklin Co. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genealogy-glh16377336&h=171&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Residence date: 1775-1783Residence place: Franklin, Pennsylvania, USAMarriage Date: 31 Aug 1781 APID: 1,14528::171
  2. Source: #S-2086554916 Page: Descendants of Samuel Perry Data: Date: Updated September 5, 2000 Note: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/i/c/Marsha-G-Richeson/GENE2-0003.html Note: Data: Text: 4. JOHN2 PERRY (SAMUEL1) was born 1746 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died March 01, 1824 in Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. He married VIOLETTE MOORE Abt. 1778 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Notes for JOHN PERRY:John Perry was the eldest son of Samuel and Annis Watson Perry and was born before they left Ireland. He made the sea voyage to America with his family and grew to adulthood on the family homestead in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, about one mile from Mercerburg. NOTE: I was terribly puzzled by the records we possess claiming John Perry was the oldest son and born in Ireland and his gravestone and family records claiming he was born in 1745,6 or 7. These "facts" just did not match up with other dates and information about the family. I knew either John Sr.'s birth date was wrong or he was older than 78 when he died, or he could not have been the eldest and born in Ireland. However, no other Perry family genealogist ever questioned these conflicts in dates and information! My questions and conflicts were answered when I "linked up" with a descendant of William Perry, Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, over the Internet. She provided me with birthdates of Samuel and Annis Perry's children. John was not the oldest, Oliver was. John was the fifth child and born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1746. This birthdate, birth order, and place of birth resolves the conflict. FURTHER NOTE: Alas, the trading of information revealed that Lynn Thomas, Joe Hebert, and Bonnie Rives are not descended from Samuel and Annis Watson Perry. However, their research into this Perry family still indicates that John was not the eldest son and was born in Lancaster County, PA. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE INFORMATION: "Perry Memo" prepared by James M. Brown of Toledo, Ohio, (son of Hiram J. L. Brown and Rosanna Perry Brown) for his grand-nephew, Henry Austin Perry of Freeport, Texas, (great-grandson of James Perry). The original James M. Brown memorandum ws loaned to C. T. Elliott, Plainfield, N.J., on January 10, 1941, by Mrs. John S. Caldwell, Freeport, Texas, daughter of Henry Austin Perry. Mr. Elliott spent considerable time and expense researching this Memo and correcting errors and updating it. He completed his Update on January 20, 1942. He left the family homestead near Mercerburg and moved to Sewickley, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in milling and merchandising. Sewickley is a little west and north of Pittsburgh in what is now Allegheny County on the Mongongahela River. His goods were transported over the mountains on packhorses, following Indian trails. He returned to Franklin County to marry Violette Moore and brought her to his western home. He was also joined by his brother James and they continued together in the milling and merchandising business. The LISTING OF INHABITANTS 1783 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania shows John Perry living in Hempfield Township. His brother William is also shown living in Hempfield Twp. David is shown living in Tyrone Twp., James in Rostraver Twp., and Samuel possibly in Huntington Twp. On April 2, 1770 John Perry bought land in what was later to become Westmoreland County from Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. According to the record from "Old Westmoreland: the History and Genealogy of Westmoreland County, PA, Vol VII, No 2, p. 17," the land was an improvement and 360 acre tract in the forks of the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers. In 1772, John sold this land to his brother, Samuel, and his widowed mother, Annis Watson Perry. Samuel and his wife Mary and Annis sold this land in 1779. At that time John and David, as well as William Moore owned adjoining land to this tract. They were among the pioneers of the Mongongahela Valley. They manufactured and shipped the first cargo of flour by the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. It consisted of 900 barrels and required three boats for its transportation. After a long and tedious journey, they reached Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but their entire cargo was seized by the Spanish authorities and confiscated. They were, however, allowed one barrel with which to make the way of themselves and crew to their homes. That barrel sold readily for $20 and they had that amount to help get them home. They finally reached home broken in fortune but not in spirit. They turned over all their property to their creditors and started anew. Their creditors, however, gave each of them a valuable tract of land. John Perry later moved to Turtle Creek, just east of Pittsburgh. Turtle Creek empties into the Mongongahela River. Later still he began the journey to Missouri with his family. John Perry Sr. served in the Revolutiony War. In 1778, he became Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Battalion of the Westmoreland County Militia. (See Penn. Archives, Series 6, Vol. 2, page 309.) Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, sent me the following information" From LANCASTER DIARY 1776 compiled by Walter F. AyarsIII for the Greater Lancaster CHapter of the Lancaster County Bicentennial Committee, 1976, p. 51, "August 15, Thursday .......Another company mustered today was Captain Robert Campbell's militia of the Porter battalion. His Second Lt. was James Walker; the Privates were ....John Perry." Why he decided to emigrate to Missouri remains a mystery. He was already getting on in years in 1800 and one would think he would be through making big moves. He was obviously a courageous man and an adventuring one, however, and perhaps he took after his Grandfather Watson who undertook an ocean voyage to find a new home when he was 104 years old! He might have wanted to find more land and new opportunites for his children. The Governor of the Louisiana Territory, Baron Carondelet, had a generous policy of land donation to settlers. More generous than that of the British because he hoped to form a barrier of settlers against the British Canadians. John and his family may have been tired of packing goods across the mountains and perhaps some of those goods were whiskey. After whiskey started being taxed by the United States Government, he might have decided to move to new territory where there was little government. Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania was the hotbed of the Whiskey Rebellion in the late 1700's. There is nothing to indicate the Perrys took part in the Rebellion, but there is every reason to believe they resented the tax on whiskey when rich Eastern planters paid no tax at all on their goods. In addition, Missouri was Spanish Territory with little government and no taxes! The old family stories always said the Perrys were merchants. The one story told over and over was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. They drank the whiskey and sold the beans - - and they were in business." I'm sure, however, they sold at least part of the whiskey! The Perrys might also have been drawn to Missouri because they heard all the speculation of rich lead deposits and possibly silver and gold. That is what attracted Moses Austin to Mine A Breton in the late 1700's. Perhaps all these reasons drew them to Missouri. The Perrys were movers and doers. Ready and willing to take risks to improve their fortunes. As one historian put it "Freedom in America included the freedom to go." And the Perrys went. The pull of new country and new opportunities pulled them like a magnet and they couldn't resist it. Whatever the reasons, John and Violette Moore Perry and their children, along with their son-in-law, John P. McGuire and possibly their grand daughter, Rachel McGuire, set off across the Cumberland Gap. Along the famous Cumberland Road they went through Louisville, Kentucky and Vincennes, Indiana to St. Louis. They may have stopped in Vincennes for a while. Mrs. Eleanor Bauer's letter to Sam Richeson states that she thought John lived there for a while. Mary Perry, called Polly, married William Small in Vincennes. In addition, Mr. Albert Love's Family Tree of the Dunklins says Rachel McGuire came to Missouri from Pennsylvania via Vincennes. Regardless, they all proceeded to St. Louis at some point in the late 1790's, except William & Polly Small. Historians in printed sources today still differ as to the dates when the Perrys first bought or received land grants in Missouri. Family tradition says that they came in 1795. Historian dates vary from 1800 to 1806. Paul Richeson's search of early land claims didn't clarify it any further. However, family tradition and early Missouri territorial records indicate that the Perrys came at the time of the Austins or soon after when Missouri was still a Spanish Territory. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1804, Missouri became a part of the "Territory of Louisiana." Mine A Breton was part of one of the original Spanish governing districts, the District of St. Genevieve, which became a "county" of the "Territory of Louisiana." It is at this point the first official records of the Perrys in Missouri occur. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE: THE PERRYS OF POTOSI "A Time To Triumph" prepared and given as a speech by Paul R. Richeson, Potosi, Missouri, for the Perry Family Reunion, Brazoria, Texas, June 18, 1977. In 1804, John Perry Sr. was appointed assessor of "Big River, The Mines, Belleview and the Murphy Settlement" by the St. Genevieve Court of Quarter Sessions. In 1805, John Perry Sr. was a Judge of the Court of Quarter Sessions. These early appointments to these positions of responsibilty suggest John Perry Sr. had been a well-known and respected citizen in the territory for at least some time before these dates. This would date his arrival back into the Spanish period. In 1806 the record of John Perry Sr. buying the Spanish grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, appears. The grant included six acres of ground and a "cabin" which became the Perry-Dunklin-McGready house, as well as the site of the Richeson house and the Perry-Dunklin-McGready Family Cemetery. "When Washington County was first settled, it had been the hunting grounds of the Shawnee, Delaware, Osage, and Kickapoo Indian tribes. ..............The original village of Mine-a-Breton (now part of Potosi through which the creek flows) gradually came into existence before the close of the century and the several lots of the same consisted of what are known as "Spanish Grants," which were concessions of land made by the Spanish Government to individual settlers. Adjoining the village, grants were also made to individuals for large tracts, one of which, consisting of 639 acres, was obtained by Basil Valle, who built a cabin between the years of 1792-1795 and cleared six acres in 1796. This tract lies south of and includes a portion of the old village of Mine-a-Breton. It was sold by Valle to John Perry who settled upon it and was one of the most prominent of the early settlers." SOURCE: THE HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, JEFFERSON, WASHINGTON, CRAWFORD, AND GASCONADE COUNTIES OF MISSOURI, published by Goodspeed, 1880. Here John Perry and his family settled and set up business with their "barrel of beans and barrel of whiskey." The "Valle cabin" became the home, store, and probably tavern. of John Sr. and his son Samuel. Next door, between home and cemetery site, another Perry store was later built and operated by John Sr.'s two younger sons, William Moore Perry and John Jr. Perry. Mine a Breton was a boom town on the frontier and the Perry's mercantile and trading posts and taverns prospered. They were the merchant men who kept the supplies for the booming mining settlements and for the frontier beyond. They also entered some mining claims of their own. They dug lead themselves and bartered for lead and furs, etc. at their stores. They shipped the lead and furs down the Mississippi to sell and then they bought goods. They brought the goods back to sell at their stores and they invested their profits in more mining lands, etc and bought more goods. It wasn't always easy, however. There was always the risk of a river disaster in which the boat and cargo would sink and possibly lives would be lost as well. River pirates were also a constant threat. The Perrys and Mine a Breton prospered and the Perry sons became civic and political leaders in this new frontier. John Perry Sr. and Violette were near the end of their lives. Violette died in 1815. John Sr. was still active enough, however, to attempt a river trip to New Orleans in 1812 and survive the sinking of the boat and the loss of all the cargo. The Fourth of July celebrations were the major social occasions on the frontier with ceremonial speaking and toast-drinking. In 1813 Col. John Perry was the vice-president of the ceremonials in Potosi where 18 toasts were drunk. In 1816 he was president of the celebration and 20 toasts were drunk. Col. Perry was evidently one of the last surviving Revolutionary War veterans in the area and in his declining years. A major toast of the day paid tribute to him and the other "surviving heroes of the Revolution." As far as religion goes, all family stories indicate that the Perrys were Presbyterians. Most of the Scotch Irish were Presbyterians and they left Northern Ireland in such large numbers in the 1700s because of religious persecution and being thrown off the land. From the Missouri Gazette, October 12, 1816, comes the following article: "September 10, 1816, a number of respectable inhabitants of the county (Washington Co., MO) met for the purpose of forming a Bible Society. Rev. Solomon Giddings was chosen as the temporary chairman and Andrew Scott, scribe of the permanent organization. COL. JOHN PERRY was chosen President; Robert M. Stevenson, Vice President; Andrew Scott, Secretary; and Robert C. Bruffey, Treasurer. In addition Directors named were Wm. Sloan, JOHN PERRY JR., George McGahan, ISRAEL MCGREADY, JOHN MCILVAIN, JOHN BRICKEY, Joseph McCormac. From the "History of the Bellevue Presbyterian Church," organized August 3, 1816, comes the following quotation regarding the above Bible Society: "Besides the three Bellevue Presbyterian Church elders, Mr. Perry, Sr. and Mr. McGready were known Presbyterians." Finally, in 1824 John Perry Sr. died and was buried in the family cemetery. His stone is a flat granite slab 6 ft. 2 inches by 3 feet laid over the grave and resting on brick 'pillows." On it is found the following inscription: JOHN PERRY Died March 1st, 1824 In The 78th Year Of His Age His will was admitted for probate on May 10, 1824 and is in the Probate Court records of Washington County. A copy of his will is in the Perry Family Book. Records of Washington County show his will was dated November 23, 1819. More About JOHN PERRY:Fact 1: Left homestead near Mercerburg & went westFact 2: Settled at Sewickley, Westmoreland Co, PAFact 3: Engaged in milling & merchandisingFact 4: Returned to Franklin Co. & married Violette MoorFact 5: He & James pioneers of Monongahela Valley.Fact 6: Shipped 1st cargo of flour by Ohio & MississippiFact 7: 1778, Rivers to New Orleans. Lt. Col in Rev. War.Fact 8: Moved to location on Turtle Cr, West. Co., PAFact 9: Abt. 1800, Moved to MO with familyFact 10: 1804, Appt. assessor of Big River, The Mines, BellevueFact 11: 1805, & Murphy Settlement. Appt. judge of qrt.sessionsFact 12: 1806, Bought Spanish land grant of Basil Valle & cabinFact 13: 1824, Died Potosi & buried in family cemeteryNotes for VIOLETTE MOORE:All we know about Violette is that she is buried in the old Perry Family Cemetey in the corner lot of the old Perry house on Jefferson Street (Bearfoot). Tombstone Inscription: VIOLETTE PERRY Died October 25, 1815 In The 58th Year of Her Age She is buried next to her husband, John. Children of JOHN PERRY and VIOLETTE MOORE are: 10. i. MARY3 PERRY, b. Abt. 1779. 11. ii. ISABELLA PERRY, b. Abt. 1780, Pennsylvania; d. Abt. 1808. 12. iii. SAMUEL PERRY, b. January 25, 1783, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. December 12, 1830, Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. iv. WILLIAM MOOR(E) PERRY, b. 1784, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. September 17, 1825, Washington County, Missouri.
  3. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  4. Source: #S-2086554916 Page: Descendants of Samuel Perry Data: Date: Updated September 5, 2000 Note: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/i/c/Marsha-G-Richeson/GENE2-0003.html Note: Data: Text: 4. JOHN2 PERRY (SAMUEL1) was born 1746 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died March 01, 1824 in Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. He married VIOLETTE MOORE Abt. 1778 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Notes for JOHN PERRY:John Perry was the eldest son of Samuel and Annis Watson Perry and was born before they left Ireland. He made the sea voyage to America with his family and grew to adulthood on the family homestead in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, about one mile from Mercerburg. NOTE: I was terribly puzzled by the records we possess claiming John Perry was the oldest son and born in Ireland and his gravestone and family records claiming he was born in 1745,6 or 7. These "facts" just did not match up with other dates and information about the family. I knew either John Sr.'s birth date was wrong or he was older than 78 when he died, or he could not have been the eldest and born in Ireland. However, no other Perry family genealogist ever questioned these conflicts in dates and information! My questions and conflicts were answered when I "linked up" with a descendant of William Perry, Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, over the Internet. She provided me with birthdates of Samuel and Annis Perry's children. John was not the oldest, Oliver was. John was the fifth child and born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1746. This birthdate, birth order, and place of birth resolves the conflict. FURTHER NOTE: Alas, the trading of information revealed that Lynn Thomas, Joe Hebert, and Bonnie Rives are not descended from Samuel and Annis Watson Perry. However, their research into this Perry family still indicates that John was not the eldest son and was born in Lancaster County, PA. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE INFORMATION: "Perry Memo" prepared by James M. Brown of Toledo, Ohio, (son of Hiram J. L. Brown and Rosanna Perry Brown) for his grand-nephew, Henry Austin Perry of Freeport, Texas, (great-grandson of James Perry). The original James M. Brown memorandum ws loaned to C. T. Elliott, Plainfield, N.J., on January 10, 1941, by Mrs. John S. Caldwell, Freeport, Texas, daughter of Henry Austin Perry. Mr. Elliott spent considerable time and expense researching this Memo and correcting errors and updating it. He completed his Update on January 20, 1942. He left the family homestead near Mercerburg and moved to Sewickley, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in milling and merchandising. Sewickley is a little west and north of Pittsburgh in what is now Allegheny County on the Mongongahela River. His goods were transported over the mountains on packhorses, following Indian trails. He returned to Franklin County to marry Violette Moore and brought her to his western home. He was also joined by his brother James and they continued together in the milling and merchandising business. The LISTING OF INHABITANTS 1783 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania shows John Perry living in Hempfield Township. His brother William is also shown living in Hempfield Twp. David is shown living in Tyrone Twp., James in Rostraver Twp., and Samuel possibly in Huntington Twp. On April 2, 1770 John Perry bought land in what was later to become Westmoreland County from Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. According to the record from "Old Westmoreland: the History and Genealogy of Westmoreland County, PA, Vol VII, No 2, p. 17," the land was an improvement and 360 acre tract in the forks of the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers. In 1772, John sold this land to his brother, Samuel, and his widowed mother, Annis Watson Perry. Samuel and his wife Mary and Annis sold this land in 1779. At that time John and David, as well as William Moore owned adjoining land to this tract. They were among the pioneers of the Mongongahela Valley. They manufactured and shipped the first cargo of flour by the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. It consisted of 900 barrels and required three boats for its transportation. After a long and tedious journey, they reached Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but their entire cargo was seized by the Spanish authorities and confiscated. They were, however, allowed one barrel with which to make the way of themselves and crew to their homes. That barrel sold readily for $20 and they had that amount to help get them home. They finally reached home broken in fortune but not in spirit. They turned over all their property to their creditors and started anew. Their creditors, however, gave each of them a valuable tract of land. John Perry later moved to Turtle Creek, just east of Pittsburgh. Turtle Creek empties into the Mongongahela River. Later still he began the journey to Missouri with his family. John Perry Sr. served in the Revolutiony War. In 1778, he became Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Battalion of the Westmoreland County Militia. (See Penn. Archives, Series 6, Vol. 2, page 309.) Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, sent me the following information" From LANCASTER DIARY 1776 compiled by Walter F. AyarsIII for the Greater Lancaster CHapter of the Lancaster County Bicentennial Committee, 1976, p. 51, "August 15, Thursday .......Another company mustered today was Captain Robert Campbell's militia of the Porter battalion. His Second Lt. was James Walker; the Privates were ....John Perry." Why he decided to emigrate to Missouri remains a mystery. He was already getting on in years in 1800 and one would think he would be through making big moves. He was obviously a courageous man and an adventuring one, however, and perhaps he took after his Grandfather Watson who undertook an ocean voyage to find a new home when he was 104 years old! He might have wanted to find more land and new opportunites for his children. The Governor of the Louisiana Territory, Baron Carondelet, had a generous policy of land donation to settlers. More generous than that of the British because he hoped to form a barrier of settlers against the British Canadians. John and his family may have been tired of packing goods across the mountains and perhaps some of those goods were whiskey. After whiskey started being taxed by the United States Government, he might have decided to move to new territory where there was little government. Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania was the hotbed of the Whiskey Rebellion in the late 1700's. There is nothing to indicate the Perrys took part in the Rebellion, but there is every reason to believe they resented the tax on whiskey when rich Eastern planters paid no tax at all on their goods. In addition, Missouri was Spanish Territory with little government and no taxes! The old family stories always said the Perrys were merchants. The one story told over and over was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. They drank the whiskey and sold the beans - - and they were in business." I'm sure, however, they sold at least part of the whiskey! The Perrys might also have been drawn to Missouri because they heard all the speculation of rich lead deposits and possibly silver and gold. That is what attracted Moses Austin to Mine A Breton in the late 1700's. Perhaps all these reasons drew them to Missouri. The Perrys were movers and doers. Ready and willing to take risks to improve their fortunes. As one historian put it "Freedom in America included the freedom to go." And the Perrys went. The pull of new country and new opportunities pulled them like a magnet and they couldn't resist it. Whatever the reasons, John and Violette Moore Perry and their children, along with their son-in-law, John P. McGuire and possibly their grand daughter, Rachel McGuire, set off across the Cumberland Gap. Along the famous Cumberland Road they went through Louisville, Kentucky and Vincennes, Indiana to St. Louis. They may have stopped in Vincennes for a while. Mrs. Eleanor Bauer's letter to Sam Richeson states that she thought John lived there for a while. Mary Perry, called Polly, married William Small in Vincennes. In addition, Mr. Albert Love's Family Tree of the Dunklins says Rachel McGuire came to Missouri from Pennsylvania via Vincennes. Regardless, they all proceeded to St. Louis at some point in the late 1790's, except William & Polly Small. Historians in printed sources today still differ as to the dates when the Perrys first bought or received land grants in Missouri. Family tradition says that they came in 1795. Historian dates vary from 1800 to 1806. Paul Richeson's search of early land claims didn't clarify it any further. However, family tradition and early Missouri territorial records indicate that the Perrys came at the time of the Austins or soon after when Missouri was still a Spanish Territory. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1804, Missouri became a part of the "Territory of Louisiana." Mine A Breton was part of one of the original Spanish governing districts, the District of St. Genevieve, which became a "county" of the "Territory of Louisiana." It is at this point the first official records of the Perrys in Missouri occur. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE: THE PERRYS OF POTOSI "A Time To Triumph" prepared and given as a speech by Paul R. Richeson, Potosi, Missouri, for the Perry Family Reunion, Brazoria, Texas, June 18, 1977. In 1804, John Perry Sr. was appointed assessor of "Big River, The Mines, Belleview and the Murphy Settlement" by the St. Genevieve Court of Quarter Sessions. In 1805, John Perry Sr. was a Judge of the Court of Quarter Sessions. These early appointments to these positions of responsibilty suggest John Perry Sr. had been a well-known and respected citizen in the territory for at least some time before these dates. This would date his arrival back into the Spanish period. In 1806 the record of John Perry Sr. buying the Spanish grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, appears. The grant included six acres of ground and a "cabin" which became the Perry-Dunklin-McGready house, as well as the site of the Richeson house and the Perry-Dunklin-McGready Family Cemetery. "When Washington County was first settled, it had been the hunting grounds of the Shawnee, Delaware, Osage, and Kickapoo Indian tribes. ..............The original village of Mine-a-Breton (now part of Potosi through which the creek flows) gradually came into existence before the close of the century and the several lots of the same consisted of what are known as "Spanish Grants," which were concessions of land made by the Spanish Government to individual settlers. Adjoining the village, grants were also made to individuals for large tracts, one of which, consisting of 639 acres, was obtained by Basil Valle, who built a cabin between the years of 1792-1795 and cleared six acres in 1796. This tract lies south of and includes a portion of the old village of Mine-a-Breton. It was sold by Valle to John Perry who settled upon it and was one of the most prominent of the early settlers." SOURCE: THE HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, JEFFERSON, WASHINGTON, CRAWFORD, AND GASCONADE COUNTIES OF MISSOURI, published by Goodspeed, 1880. Here John Perry and his family settled and set up business with their "barrel of beans and barrel of whiskey." The "Valle cabin" became the home, store, and probably tavern. of John Sr. and his son Samuel. Next door, between home and cemetery site, another Perry store was later built and operated by John Sr.'s two younger sons, William Moore Perry and John Jr. Perry. Mine a Breton was a boom town on the frontier and the Perry's mercantile and trading posts and taverns prospered. They were the merchant men who kept the supplies for the booming mining settlements and for the frontier beyond. They also entered some mining claims of their own. They dug lead themselves and bartered for lead and furs, etc. at their stores. They shipped the lead and furs down the Mississippi to sell and then they bought goods. They brought the goods back to sell at their stores and they invested their profits in more mining lands, etc and bought more goods. It wasn't always easy, however. There was always the risk of a river disaster in which the boat and cargo would sink and possibly lives would be lost as well. River pirates were also a constant threat. The Perrys and Mine a Breton prospered and the Perry sons became civic and political leaders in this new frontier. John Perry Sr. and Violette were near the end of their lives. Violette died in 1815. John Sr. was still active enough, however, to attempt a river trip to New Orleans in 1812 and survive the sinking of the boat and the loss of all the cargo. The Fourth of July celebrations were the major social occasions on the frontier with ceremonial speaking and toast-drinking. In 1813 Col. John Perry was the vice-president of the ceremonials in Potosi where 18 toasts were drunk. In 1816 he was president of the celebration and 20 toasts were drunk. Col. Perry was evidently one of the last surviving Revolutionary War veterans in the area and in his declining years. A major toast of the day paid tribute to him and the other "surviving heroes of the Revolution." As far as religion goes, all family stories indicate that the Perrys were Presbyterians. Most of the Scotch Irish were Presbyterians and they left Northern Ireland in such large numbers in the 1700s because of religious persecution and being thrown off the land. From the Missouri Gazette, October 12, 1816, comes the following article: "September 10, 1816, a number of respectable inhabitants of the county (Washington Co., MO) met for the purpose of forming a Bible Society. Rev. Solomon Giddings was chosen as the temporary chairman and Andrew Scott, scribe of the permanent organization. COL. JOHN PERRY was chosen President; Robert M. Stevenson, Vice President; Andrew Scott, Secretary; and Robert C. Bruffey, Treasurer. In addition Directors named were Wm. Sloan, JOHN PERRY JR., George McGahan, ISRAEL MCGREADY, JOHN MCILVAIN, JOHN BRICKEY, Joseph McCormac. From the "History of the Bellevue Presbyterian Church," organized August 3, 1816, comes the following quotation regarding the above Bible Society: "Besides the three Bellevue Presbyterian Church elders, Mr. Perry, Sr. and Mr. McGready were known Presbyterians." Finally, in 1824 John Perry Sr. died and was buried in the family cemetery. His stone is a flat granite slab 6 ft. 2 inches by 3 feet laid over the grave and resting on brick 'pillows." On it is found the following inscription: JOHN PERRY Died March 1st, 1824 In The 78th Year Of His Age His will was admitted for probate on May 10, 1824 and is in the Probate Court records of Washington County. A copy of his will is in the Perry Family Book. Records of Washington County show his will was dated November 23, 1819. More About JOHN PERRY:Fact 1: Left homestead near Mercerburg & went westFact 2: Settled at Sewickley, Westmoreland Co, PAFact 3: Engaged in milling & merchandisingFact 4: Returned to Franklin Co. & married Violette MoorFact 5: He & James pioneers of Monongahela Valley.Fact 6: Shipped 1st cargo of flour by Ohio & MississippiFact 7: 1778, Rivers to New Orleans. Lt. Col in Rev. War.Fact 8: Moved to location on Turtle Cr, West. Co., PAFact 9: Abt. 1800, Moved to MO with familyFact 10: 1804, Appt. assessor of Big River, The Mines, BellevueFact 11: 1805, & Murphy Settlement. Appt. judge of qrt.sessionsFact 12: 1806, Bought Spanish land grant of Basil Valle & cabinFact 13: 1824, Died Potosi & buried in family cemeteryNotes for VIOLETTE MOORE:All we know about Violette is that she is buried in the old Perry Family Cemetey in the corner lot of the old Perry house on Jefferson Street (Bearfoot). Tombstone Inscription: VIOLETTE PERRY Died October 25, 1815 In The 58th Year of Her Age She is buried next to her husband, John. Children of JOHN PERRY and VIOLETTE MOORE are: 10. i. MARY3 PERRY, b. Abt. 1779. 11. ii. ISABELLA PERRY, b. Abt. 1780, Pennsylvania; d. Abt. 1808. 12. iii. SAMUEL PERRY, b. January 25, 1783, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. December 12, 1830, Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. iv. WILLIAM MOOR(E) PERRY, b. 1784, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. September 17, 1825, Washington County, Missouri.
  5. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  6. Source: #S-2086554916 Page: Descendants of Samuel Perry Data: Date: Updated September 5, 2000 Note: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/i/c/Marsha-G-Richeson/GENE2-0003.html Note: Data: Text: 4. JOHN2 PERRY (SAMUEL1) was born 1746 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died March 01, 1824 in Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. He married VIOLETTE MOORE Abt. 1778 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Notes for JOHN PERRY:John Perry was the eldest son of Samuel and Annis Watson Perry and was born before they left Ireland. He made the sea voyage to America with his family and grew to adulthood on the family homestead in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, about one mile from Mercerburg. NOTE: I was terribly puzzled by the records we possess claiming John Perry was the oldest son and born in Ireland and his gravestone and family records claiming he was born in 1745,6 or 7. These "facts" just did not match up with other dates and information about the family. I knew either John Sr.'s birth date was wrong or he was older than 78 when he died, or he could not have been the eldest and born in Ireland. However, no other Perry family genealogist ever questioned these conflicts in dates and information! My questions and conflicts were answered when I "linked up" with a descendant of William Perry, Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, over the Internet. She provided me with birthdates of Samuel and Annis Perry's children. John was not the oldest, Oliver was. John was the fifth child and born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1746. This birthdate, birth order, and place of birth resolves the conflict. FURTHER NOTE: Alas, the trading of information revealed that Lynn Thomas, Joe Hebert, and Bonnie Rives are not descended from Samuel and Annis Watson Perry. However, their research into this Perry family still indicates that John was not the eldest son and was born in Lancaster County, PA. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE INFORMATION: "Perry Memo" prepared by James M. Brown of Toledo, Ohio, (son of Hiram J. L. Brown and Rosanna Perry Brown) for his grand-nephew, Henry Austin Perry of Freeport, Texas, (great-grandson of James Perry). The original James M. Brown memorandum ws loaned to C. T. Elliott, Plainfield, N.J., on January 10, 1941, by Mrs. John S. Caldwell, Freeport, Texas, daughter of Henry Austin Perry. Mr. Elliott spent considerable time and expense researching this Memo and correcting errors and updating it. He completed his Update on January 20, 1942. He left the family homestead near Mercerburg and moved to Sewickley, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in milling and merchandising. Sewickley is a little west and north of Pittsburgh in what is now Allegheny County on the Mongongahela River. His goods were transported over the mountains on packhorses, following Indian trails. He returned to Franklin County to marry Violette Moore and brought her to his western home. He was also joined by his brother James and they continued together in the milling and merchandising business. The LISTING OF INHABITANTS 1783 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania shows John Perry living in Hempfield Township. His brother William is also shown living in Hempfield Twp. David is shown living in Tyrone Twp., James in Rostraver Twp., and Samuel possibly in Huntington Twp. On April 2, 1770 John Perry bought land in what was later to become Westmoreland County from Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. According to the record from "Old Westmoreland: the History and Genealogy of Westmoreland County, PA, Vol VII, No 2, p. 17," the land was an improvement and 360 acre tract in the forks of the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers. In 1772, John sold this land to his brother, Samuel, and his widowed mother, Annis Watson Perry. Samuel and his wife Mary and Annis sold this land in 1779. At that time John and David, as well as William Moore owned adjoining land to this tract. They were among the pioneers of the Mongongahela Valley. They manufactured and shipped the first cargo of flour by the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. It consisted of 900 barrels and required three boats for its transportation. After a long and tedious journey, they reached Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but their entire cargo was seized by the Spanish authorities and confiscated. They were, however, allowed one barrel with which to make the way of themselves and crew to their homes. That barrel sold readily for $20 and they had that amount to help get them home. They finally reached home broken in fortune but not in spirit. They turned over all their property to their creditors and started anew. Their creditors, however, gave each of them a valuable tract of land. John Perry later moved to Turtle Creek, just east of Pittsburgh. Turtle Creek empties into the Mongongahela River. Later still he began the journey to Missouri with his family. John Perry Sr. served in the Revolutiony War. In 1778, he became Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Battalion of the Westmoreland County Militia. (See Penn. Archives, Series 6, Vol. 2, page 309.) Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, sent me the following information" From LANCASTER DIARY 1776 compiled by Walter F. AyarsIII for the Greater Lancaster CHapter of the Lancaster County Bicentennial Committee, 1976, p. 51, "August 15, Thursday .......Another company mustered today was Captain Robert Campbell's militia of the Porter battalion. His Second Lt. was James Walker; the Privates were ....John Perry." Why he decided to emigrate to Missouri remains a mystery. He was already getting on in years in 1800 and one would think he would be through making big moves. He was obviously a courageous man and an adventuring one, however, and perhaps he took after his Grandfather Watson who undertook an ocean voyage to find a new home when he was 104 years old! He might have wanted to find more land and new opportunites for his children. The Governor of the Louisiana Territory, Baron Carondelet, had a generous policy of land donation to settlers. More generous than that of the British because he hoped to form a barrier of settlers against the British Canadians. John and his family may have been tired of packing goods across the mountains and perhaps some of those goods were whiskey. After whiskey started being taxed by the United States Government, he might have decided to move to new territory where there was little government. Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania was the hotbed of the Whiskey Rebellion in the late 1700's. There is nothing to indicate the Perrys took part in the Rebellion, but there is every reason to believe they resented the tax on whiskey when rich Eastern planters paid no tax at all on their goods. In addition, Missouri was Spanish Territory with little government and no taxes! The old family stories always said the Perrys were merchants. The one story told over and over was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. They drank the whiskey and sold the beans - - and they were in business." I'm sure, however, they sold at least part of the whiskey! The Perrys might also have been drawn to Missouri because they heard all the speculation of rich lead deposits and possibly silver and gold. That is what attracted Moses Austin to Mine A Breton in the late 1700's. Perhaps all these reasons drew them to Missouri. The Perrys were movers and doers. Ready and willing to take risks to improve their fortunes. As one historian put it "Freedom in America included the freedom to go." And the Perrys went. The pull of new country and new opportunities pulled them like a magnet and they couldn't resist it. Whatever the reasons, John and Violette Moore Perry and their children, along with their son-in-law, John P. McGuire and possibly their grand daughter, Rachel McGuire, set off across the Cumberland Gap. Along the famous Cumberland Road they went through Louisville, Kentucky and Vincennes, Indiana to St. Louis. They may have stopped in Vincennes for a while. Mrs. Eleanor Bauer's letter to Sam Richeson states that she thought John lived there for a while. Mary Perry, called Polly, married William Small in Vincennes. In addition, Mr. Albert Love's Family Tree of the Dunklins says Rachel McGuire came to Missouri from Pennsylvania via Vincennes. Regardless, they all proceeded to St. Louis at some point in the late 1790's, except William & Polly Small. Historians in printed sources today still differ as to the dates when the Perrys first bought or received land grants in Missouri. Family tradition says that they came in 1795. Historian dates vary from 1800 to 1806. Paul Richeson's search of early land claims didn't clarify it any further. However, family tradition and early Missouri territorial records indicate that the Perrys came at the time of the Austins or soon after when Missouri was still a Spanish Territory. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1804, Missouri became a part of the "Territory of Louisiana." Mine A Breton was part of one of the original Spanish governing districts, the District of St. Genevieve, which became a "county" of the "Territory of Louisiana." It is at this point the first official records of the Perrys in Missouri occur. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE: THE PERRYS OF POTOSI "A Time To Triumph" prepared and given as a speech by Paul R. Richeson, Potosi, Missouri, for the Perry Family Reunion, Brazoria, Texas, June 18, 1977. In 1804, John Perry Sr. was appointed assessor of "Big River, The Mines, Belleview and the Murphy Settlement" by the St. Genevieve Court of Quarter Sessions. In 1805, John Perry Sr. was a Judge of the Court of Quarter Sessions. These early appointments to these positions of responsibilty suggest John Perry Sr. had been a well-known and respected citizen in the territory for at least some time before these dates. This would date his arrival back into the Spanish period. In 1806 the record of John Perry Sr. buying the Spanish grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, appears. The grant included six acres of ground and a "cabin" which became the Perry-Dunklin-McGready house, as well as the site of the Richeson house and the Perry-Dunklin-McGready Family Cemetery. "When Washington County was first settled, it had been the hunting grounds of the Shawnee, Delaware, Osage, and Kickapoo Indian tribes. ..............The original village of Mine-a-Breton (now part of Potosi through which the creek flows) gradually came into existence before the close of the century and the several lots of the same consisted of what are known as "Spanish Grants," which were concessions of land made by the Spanish Government to individual settlers. Adjoining the village, grants were also made to individuals for large tracts, one of which, consisting of 639 acres, was obtained by Basil Valle, who built a cabin between the years of 1792-1795 and cleared six acres in 1796. This tract lies south of and includes a portion of the old village of Mine-a-Breton. It was sold by Valle to John Perry who settled upon it and was one of the most prominent of the early settlers." SOURCE: THE HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, JEFFERSON, WASHINGTON, CRAWFORD, AND GASCONADE COUNTIES OF MISSOURI, published by Goodspeed, 1880. Here John Perry and his family settled and set up business with their "barrel of beans and barrel of whiskey." The "Valle cabin" became the home, store, and probably tavern. of John Sr. and his son Samuel. Next door, between home and cemetery site, another Perry store was later built and operated by John Sr.'s two younger sons, William Moore Perry and John Jr. Perry. Mine a Breton was a boom town on the frontier and the Perry's mercantile and trading posts and taverns prospered. They were the merchant men who kept the supplies for the booming mining settlements and for the frontier beyond. They also entered some mining claims of their own. They dug lead themselves and bartered for lead and furs, etc. at their stores. They shipped the lead and furs down the Mississippi to sell and then they bought goods. They brought the goods back to sell at their stores and they invested their profits in more mining lands, etc and bought more goods. It wasn't always easy, however. There was always the risk of a river disaster in which the boat and cargo would sink and possibly lives would be lost as well. River pirates were also a constant threat. The Perrys and Mine a Breton prospered and the Perry sons became civic and political leaders in this new frontier. John Perry Sr. and Violette were near the end of their lives. Violette died in 1815. John Sr. was still active enough, however, to attempt a river trip to New Orleans in 1812 and survive the sinking of the boat and the loss of all the cargo. The Fourth of July celebrations were the major social occasions on the frontier with ceremonial speaking and toast-drinking. In 1813 Col. John Perry was the vice-president of the ceremonials in Potosi where 18 toasts were drunk. In 1816 he was president of the celebration and 20 toasts were drunk. Col. Perry was evidently one of the last surviving Revolutionary War veterans in the area and in his declining years. A major toast of the day paid tribute to him and the other "surviving heroes of the Revolution." As far as religion goes, all family stories indicate that the Perrys were Presbyterians. Most of the Scotch Irish were Presbyterians and they left Northern Ireland in such large numbers in the 1700s because of religious persecution and being thrown off the land. From the Missouri Gazette, October 12, 1816, comes the following article: "September 10, 1816, a number of respectable inhabitants of the county (Washington Co., MO) met for the purpose of forming a Bible Society. Rev. Solomon Giddings was chosen as the temporary chairman and Andrew Scott, scribe of the permanent organization. COL. JOHN PERRY was chosen President; Robert M. Stevenson, Vice President; Andrew Scott, Secretary; and Robert C. Bruffey, Treasurer. In addition Directors named were Wm. Sloan, JOHN PERRY JR., George McGahan, ISRAEL MCGREADY, JOHN MCILVAIN, JOHN BRICKEY, Joseph McCormac. From the "History of the Bellevue Presbyterian Church," organized August 3, 1816, comes the following quotation regarding the above Bible Society: "Besides the three Bellevue Presbyterian Church elders, Mr. Perry, Sr. and Mr. McGready were known Presbyterians." Finally, in 1824 John Perry Sr. died and was buried in the family cemetery. His stone is a flat granite slab 6 ft. 2 inches by 3 feet laid over the grave and resting on brick 'pillows." On it is found the following inscription: JOHN PERRY Died March 1st, 1824 In The 78th Year Of His Age His will was admitted for probate on May 10, 1824 and is in the Probate Court records of Washington County. A copy of his will is in the Perry Family Book. Records of Washington County show his will was dated November 23, 1819. More About JOHN PERRY:Fact 1: Left homestead near Mercerburg & went westFact 2: Settled at Sewickley, Westmoreland Co, PAFact 3: Engaged in milling & merchandisingFact 4: Returned to Franklin Co. & married Violette MoorFact 5: He & James pioneers of Monongahela Valley.Fact 6: Shipped 1st cargo of flour by Ohio & MississippiFact 7: 1778, Rivers to New Orleans. Lt. Col in Rev. War.Fact 8: Moved to location on Turtle Cr, West. Co., PAFact 9: Abt. 1800, Moved to MO with familyFact 10: 1804, Appt. assessor of Big River, The Mines, BellevueFact 11: 1805, & Murphy Settlement. Appt. judge of qrt.sessionsFact 12: 1806, Bought Spanish land grant of Basil Valle & cabinFact 13: 1824, Died Potosi & buried in family cemeteryNotes for VIOLETTE MOORE:All we know about Violette is that she is buried in the old Perry Family Cemetey in the corner lot of the old Perry house on Jefferson Street (Bearfoot). Tombstone Inscription: VIOLETTE PERRY Died October 25, 1815 In The 58th Year of Her Age She is buried next to her husband, John. Children of JOHN PERRY and VIOLETTE MOORE are: 10. i. MARY3 PERRY, b. Abt. 1779. 11. ii. ISABELLA PERRY, b. Abt. 1780, Pennsylvania; d. Abt. 1808. 12. iii. SAMUEL PERRY, b. January 25, 1783, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. December 12, 1830, Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. iv. WILLIAM MOOR(E) PERRY, b. 1784, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. September 17, 1825, Washington County, Missouri.
  7. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  8. Source: #S-2086554916 Page: Descendants of Samuel Perry Data: Date: Updated September 5, 2000 Note: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/i/c/Marsha-G-Richeson/GENE2-0003.html Note: Data: Text: 4. JOHN2 PERRY (SAMUEL1) was born 1746 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died March 01, 1824 in Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. He married VIOLETTE MOORE Abt. 1778 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Notes for JOHN PERRY:John Perry was the eldest son of Samuel and Annis Watson Perry and was born before they left Ireland. He made the sea voyage to America with his family and grew to adulthood on the family homestead in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, about one mile from Mercerburg. NOTE: I was terribly puzzled by the records we possess claiming John Perry was the oldest son and born in Ireland and his gravestone and family records claiming he was born in 1745,6 or 7. These "facts" just did not match up with other dates and information about the family. I knew either John Sr.'s birth date was wrong or he was older than 78 when he died, or he could not have been the eldest and born in Ireland. However, no other Perry family genealogist ever questioned these conflicts in dates and information! My questions and conflicts were answered when I "linked up" with a descendant of William Perry, Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, over the Internet. She provided me with birthdates of Samuel and Annis Perry's children. John was not the oldest, Oliver was. John was the fifth child and born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1746. This birthdate, birth order, and place of birth resolves the conflict. FURTHER NOTE: Alas, the trading of information revealed that Lynn Thomas, Joe Hebert, and Bonnie Rives are not descended from Samuel and Annis Watson Perry. However, their research into this Perry family still indicates that John was not the eldest son and was born in Lancaster County, PA. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE INFORMATION: "Perry Memo" prepared by James M. Brown of Toledo, Ohio, (son of Hiram J. L. Brown and Rosanna Perry Brown) for his grand-nephew, Henry Austin Perry of Freeport, Texas, (great-grandson of James Perry). The original James M. Brown memorandum ws loaned to C. T. Elliott, Plainfield, N.J., on January 10, 1941, by Mrs. John S. Caldwell, Freeport, Texas, daughter of Henry Austin Perry. Mr. Elliott spent considerable time and expense researching this Memo and correcting errors and updating it. He completed his Update on January 20, 1942. He left the family homestead near Mercerburg and moved to Sewickley, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in milling and merchandising. Sewickley is a little west and north of Pittsburgh in what is now Allegheny County on the Mongongahela River. His goods were transported over the mountains on packhorses, following Indian trails. He returned to Franklin County to marry Violette Moore and brought her to his western home. He was also joined by his brother James and they continued together in the milling and merchandising business. The LISTING OF INHABITANTS 1783 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania shows John Perry living in Hempfield Township. His brother William is also shown living in Hempfield Twp. David is shown living in Tyrone Twp., James in Rostraver Twp., and Samuel possibly in Huntington Twp. On April 2, 1770 John Perry bought land in what was later to become Westmoreland County from Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. According to the record from "Old Westmoreland: the History and Genealogy of Westmoreland County, PA, Vol VII, No 2, p. 17," the land was an improvement and 360 acre tract in the forks of the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers. In 1772, John sold this land to his brother, Samuel, and his widowed mother, Annis Watson Perry. Samuel and his wife Mary and Annis sold this land in 1779. At that time John and David, as well as William Moore owned adjoining land to this tract. They were among the pioneers of the Mongongahela Valley. They manufactured and shipped the first cargo of flour by the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. It consisted of 900 barrels and required three boats for its transportation. After a long and tedious journey, they reached Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but their entire cargo was seized by the Spanish authorities and confiscated. They were, however, allowed one barrel with which to make the way of themselves and crew to their homes. That barrel sold readily for $20 and they had that amount to help get them home. They finally reached home broken in fortune but not in spirit. They turned over all their property to their creditors and started anew. Their creditors, however, gave each of them a valuable tract of land. John Perry later moved to Turtle Creek, just east of Pittsburgh. Turtle Creek empties into the Mongongahela River. Later still he began the journey to Missouri with his family. John Perry Sr. served in the Revolutiony War. In 1778, he became Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Battalion of the Westmoreland County Militia. (See Penn. Archives, Series 6, Vol. 2, page 309.) Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, sent me the following information" From LANCASTER DIARY 1776 compiled by Walter F. AyarsIII for the Greater Lancaster CHapter of the Lancaster County Bicentennial Committee, 1976, p. 51, "August 15, Thursday .......Another company mustered today was Captain Robert Campbell's militia of the Porter battalion. His Second Lt. was James Walker; the Privates were ....John Perry." Why he decided to emigrate to Missouri remains a mystery. He was already getting on in years in 1800 and one would think he would be through making big moves. He was obviously a courageous man and an adventuring one, however, and perhaps he took after his Grandfather Watson who undertook an ocean voyage to find a new home when he was 104 years old! He might have wanted to find more land and new opportunites for his children. The Governor of the Louisiana Territory, Baron Carondelet, had a generous policy of land donation to settlers. More generous than that of the British because he hoped to form a barrier of settlers against the British Canadians. John and his family may have been tired of packing goods across the mountains and perhaps some of those goods were whiskey. After whiskey started being taxed by the United States Government, he might have decided to move to new territory where there was little government. Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania was the hotbed of the Whiskey Rebellion in the late 1700's. There is nothing to indicate the Perrys took part in the Rebellion, but there is every reason to believe they resented the tax on whiskey when rich Eastern planters paid no tax at all on their goods. In addition, Missouri was Spanish Territory with little government and no taxes! The old family stories always said the Perrys were merchants. The one story told over and over was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. They drank the whiskey and sold the beans - - and they were in business." I'm sure, however, they sold at least part of the whiskey! The Perrys might also have been drawn to Missouri because they heard all the speculation of rich lead deposits and possibly silver and gold. That is what attracted Moses Austin to Mine A Breton in the late 1700's. Perhaps all these reasons drew them to Missouri. The Perrys were movers and doers. Ready and willing to take risks to improve their fortunes. As one historian put it "Freedom in America included the freedom to go." And the Perrys went. The pull of new country and new opportunities pulled them like a magnet and they couldn't resist it. Whatever the reasons, John and Violette Moore Perry and their children, along with their son-in-law, John P. McGuire and possibly their grand daughter, Rachel McGuire, set off across the Cumberland Gap. Along the famous Cumberland Road they went through Louisville, Kentucky and Vincennes, Indiana to St. Louis. They may have stopped in Vincennes for a while. Mrs. Eleanor Bauer's letter to Sam Richeson states that she thought John lived there for a while. Mary Perry, called Polly, married William Small in Vincennes. In addition, Mr. Albert Love's Family Tree of the Dunklins says Rachel McGuire came to Missouri from Pennsylvania via Vincennes. Regardless, they all proceeded to St. Louis at some point in the late 1790's, except William & Polly Small. Historians in printed sources today still differ as to the dates when the Perrys first bought or received land grants in Missouri. Family tradition says that they came in 1795. Historian dates vary from 1800 to 1806. Paul Richeson's search of early land claims didn't clarify it any further. However, family tradition and early Missouri territorial records indicate that the Perrys came at the time of the Austins or soon after when Missouri was still a Spanish Territory. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1804, Missouri became a part of the "Territory of Louisiana." Mine A Breton was part of one of the original Spanish governing districts, the District of St. Genevieve, which became a "county" of the "Territory of Louisiana." It is at this point the first official records of the Perrys in Missouri occur. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE: THE PERRYS OF POTOSI "A Time To Triumph" prepared and given as a speech by Paul R. Richeson, Potosi, Missouri, for the Perry Family Reunion, Brazoria, Texas, June 18, 1977. In 1804, John Perry Sr. was appointed assessor of "Big River, The Mines, Belleview and the Murphy Settlement" by the St. Genevieve Court of Quarter Sessions. In 1805, John Perry Sr. was a Judge of the Court of Quarter Sessions. These early appointments to these positions of responsibilty suggest John Perry Sr. had been a well-known and respected citizen in the territory for at least some time before these dates. This would date his arrival back into the Spanish period. In 1806 the record of John Perry Sr. buying the Spanish grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, appears. The grant included six acres of ground and a "cabin" which became the Perry-Dunklin-McGready house, as well as the site of the Richeson house and the Perry-Dunklin-McGready Family Cemetery. "When Washington County was first settled, it had been the hunting grounds of the Shawnee, Delaware, Osage, and Kickapoo Indian tribes. ..............The original village of Mine-a-Breton (now part of Potosi through which the creek flows) gradually came into existence before the close of the century and the several lots of the same consisted of what are known as "Spanish Grants," which were concessions of land made by the Spanish Government to individual settlers. Adjoining the village, grants were also made to individuals for large tracts, one of which, consisting of 639 acres, was obtained by Basil Valle, who built a cabin between the years of 1792-1795 and cleared six acres in 1796. This tract lies south of and includes a portion of the old village of Mine-a-Breton. It was sold by Valle to John Perry who settled upon it and was one of the most prominent of the early settlers." SOURCE: THE HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, JEFFERSON, WASHINGTON, CRAWFORD, AND GASCONADE COUNTIES OF MISSOURI, published by Goodspeed, 1880. Here John Perry and his family settled and set up business with their "barrel of beans and barrel of whiskey." The "Valle cabin" became the home, store, and probably tavern. of John Sr. and his son Samuel. Next door, between home and cemetery site, another Perry store was later built and operated by John Sr.'s two younger sons, William Moore Perry and John Jr. Perry. Mine a Breton was a boom town on the frontier and the Perry's mercantile and trading posts and taverns prospered. They were the merchant men who kept the supplies for the booming mining settlements and for the frontier beyond. They also entered some mining claims of their own. They dug lead themselves and bartered for lead and furs, etc. at their stores. They shipped the lead and furs down the Mississippi to sell and then they bought goods. They brought the goods back to sell at their stores and they invested their profits in more mining lands, etc and bought more goods. It wasn't always easy, however. There was always the risk of a river disaster in which the boat and cargo would sink and possibly lives would be lost as well. River pirates were also a constant threat. The Perrys and Mine a Breton prospered and the Perry sons became civic and political leaders in this new frontier. John Perry Sr. and Violette were near the end of their lives. Violette died in 1815. John Sr. was still active enough, however, to attempt a river trip to New Orleans in 1812 and survive the sinking of the boat and the loss of all the cargo. The Fourth of July celebrations were the major social occasions on the frontier with ceremonial speaking and toast-drinking. In 1813 Col. John Perry was the vice-president of the ceremonials in Potosi where 18 toasts were drunk. In 1816 he was president of the celebration and 20 toasts were drunk. Col. Perry was evidently one of the last surviving Revolutionary War veterans in the area and in his declining years. A major toast of the day paid tribute to him and the other "surviving heroes of the Revolution." As far as religion goes, all family stories indicate that the Perrys were Presbyterians. Most of the Scotch Irish were Presbyterians and they left Northern Ireland in such large numbers in the 1700s because of religious persecution and being thrown off the land. From the Missouri Gazette, October 12, 1816, comes the following article: "September 10, 1816, a number of respectable inhabitants of the county (Washington Co., MO) met for the purpose of forming a Bible Society. Rev. Solomon Giddings was chosen as the temporary chairman and Andrew Scott, scribe of the permanent organization. COL. JOHN PERRY was chosen President; Robert M. Stevenson, Vice President; Andrew Scott, Secretary; and Robert C. Bruffey, Treasurer. In addition Directors named were Wm. Sloan, JOHN PERRY JR., George McGahan, ISRAEL MCGREADY, JOHN MCILVAIN, JOHN BRICKEY, Joseph McCormac. From the "History of the Bellevue Presbyterian Church," organized August 3, 1816, comes the following quotation regarding the above Bible Society: "Besides the three Bellevue Presbyterian Church elders, Mr. Perry, Sr. and Mr. McGready were known Presbyterians." Finally, in 1824 John Perry Sr. died and was buried in the family cemetery. His stone is a flat granite slab 6 ft. 2 inches by 3 feet laid over the grave and resting on brick 'pillows." On it is found the following inscription: JOHN PERRY Died March 1st, 1824 In The 78th Year Of His Age His will was admitted for probate on May 10, 1824 and is in the Probate Court records of Washington County. A copy of his will is in the Perry Family Book. Records of Washington County show his will was dated November 23, 1819. More About JOHN PERRY:Fact 1: Left homestead near Mercerburg & went westFact 2: Settled at Sewickley, Westmoreland Co, PAFact 3: Engaged in milling & merchandisingFact 4: Returned to Franklin Co. & married Violette MoorFact 5: He & James pioneers of Monongahela Valley.Fact 6: Shipped 1st cargo of flour by Ohio & MississippiFact 7: 1778, Rivers to New Orleans. Lt. Col in Rev. War.Fact 8: Moved to location on Turtle Cr, West. Co., PAFact 9: Abt. 1800, Moved to MO with familyFact 10: 1804, Appt. assessor of Big River, The Mines, BellevueFact 11: 1805, & Murphy Settlement. Appt. judge of qrt.sessionsFact 12: 1806, Bought Spanish land grant of Basil Valle & cabinFact 13: 1824, Died Potosi & buried in family cemeteryNotes for VIOLETTE MOORE:All we know about Violette is that she is buried in the old Perry Family Cemetey in the corner lot of the old Perry house on Jefferson Street (Bearfoot). Tombstone Inscription: VIOLETTE PERRY Died October 25, 1815 In The 58th Year of Her Age She is buried next to her husband, John. Children of JOHN PERRY and VIOLETTE MOORE are: 10. i. MARY3 PERRY, b. Abt. 1779. 11. ii. ISABELLA PERRY, b. Abt. 1780, Pennsylvania; d. Abt. 1808. 12. iii. SAMUEL PERRY, b. January 25, 1783, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. December 12, 1830, Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. iv. WILLIAM MOOR(E) PERRY, b. 1784, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. September 17, 1825, Washington County, Missouri.
  9. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  10. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  11. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  12. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for $250 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).
  13. Source: #S-2079074900 Page: Soldiers of Franklin Co. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genealogy-glh16377336&h=171&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Residence date: 1775-1783Residence place: Franklin, Pennsylvania, USAMarriage Date: 31 Aug 1781 APID: 1,14528::171
  14. Source: #S-2079074900 Page: Soldiers of Franklin Co. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genealogy-glh16377336&h=171&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Residence date: 1775-1783Residence place: Franklin, Pennsylvania, USAMarriage Date: 31 Aug 1781 APID: 1,14528::171
  15. Source: #S-2086554916 Page: Descendants of Samuel Perry Data: Date: Updated September 5, 2000 Note: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/i/c/Marsha-G-Richeson/GENE2-0003.html Note: Data: Text: 4. JOHN2 PERRY (SAMUEL1) was born 1746 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died March 01, 1824 in Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. He married VIOLETTE MOORE Abt. 1778 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Notes for JOHN PERRY:John Perry was the eldest son of Samuel and Annis Watson Perry and was born before they left Ireland. He made the sea voyage to America with his family and grew to adulthood on the family homestead in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, about one mile from Mercerburg. NOTE: I was terribly puzzled by the records we possess claiming John Perry was the oldest son and born in Ireland and his gravestone and family records claiming he was born in 1745,6 or 7. These "facts" just did not match up with other dates and information about the family. I knew either John Sr.'s birth date was wrong or he was older than 78 when he died, or he could not have been the eldest and born in Ireland. However, no other Perry family genealogist ever questioned these conflicts in dates and information! My questions and conflicts were answered when I "linked up" with a descendant of William Perry, Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, over the Internet. She provided me with birthdates of Samuel and Annis Perry's children. John was not the oldest, Oliver was. John was the fifth child and born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1746. This birthdate, birth order, and place of birth resolves the conflict. FURTHER NOTE: Alas, the trading of information revealed that Lynn Thomas, Joe Hebert, and Bonnie Rives are not descended from Samuel and Annis Watson Perry. However, their research into this Perry family still indicates that John was not the eldest son and was born in Lancaster County, PA. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE INFORMATION: "Perry Memo" prepared by James M. Brown of Toledo, Ohio, (son of Hiram J. L. Brown and Rosanna Perry Brown) for his grand-nephew, Henry Austin Perry of Freeport, Texas, (great-grandson of James Perry). The original James M. Brown memorandum ws loaned to C. T. Elliott, Plainfield, N.J., on January 10, 1941, by Mrs. John S. Caldwell, Freeport, Texas, daughter of Henry Austin Perry. Mr. Elliott spent considerable time and expense researching this Memo and correcting errors and updating it. He completed his Update on January 20, 1942. He left the family homestead near Mercerburg and moved to Sewickley, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in milling and merchandising. Sewickley is a little west and north of Pittsburgh in what is now Allegheny County on the Mongongahela River. His goods were transported over the mountains on packhorses, following Indian trails. He returned to Franklin County to marry Violette Moore and brought her to his western home. He was also joined by his brother James and they continued together in the milling and merchandising business. The LISTING OF INHABITANTS 1783 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania shows John Perry living in Hempfield Township. His brother William is also shown living in Hempfield Twp. David is shown living in Tyrone Twp., James in Rostraver Twp., and Samuel possibly in Huntington Twp. On April 2, 1770 John Perry bought land in what was later to become Westmoreland County from Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. According to the record from "Old Westmoreland: the History and Genealogy of Westmoreland County, PA, Vol VII, No 2, p. 17," the land was an improvement and 360 acre tract in the forks of the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers. In 1772, John sold this land to his brother, Samuel, and his widowed mother, Annis Watson Perry. Samuel and his wife Mary and Annis sold this land in 1779. At that time John and David, as well as William Moore owned adjoining land to this tract. They were among the pioneers of the Mongongahela Valley. They manufactured and shipped the first cargo of flour by the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. It consisted of 900 barrels and required three boats for its transportation. After a long and tedious journey, they reached Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but their entire cargo was seized by the Spanish authorities and confiscated. They were, however, allowed one barrel with which to make the way of themselves and crew to their homes. That barrel sold readily for and they had that amount to help get them home. They finally reached home broken in fortune but not in spirit. They turned over all their property to their creditors and started anew. Their creditors, however, gave each of them a valuable tract of land. John Perry later moved to Turtle Creek, just east of Pittsburgh. Turtle Creek empties into the Mongongahela River. Later still he began the journey to Missouri with his family. John Perry Sr. served in the Revolutiony War. In 1778, he became Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Battalion of the Westmoreland County Militia. (See Penn. Archives, Series 6, Vol. 2, page 309.) Lynn Thomas of Grants Pass, Oregon, sent me the following information" From LANCASTER DIARY 1776 compiled by Walter F. AyarsIII for the Greater Lancaster CHapter of the Lancaster County Bicentennial Committee, 1976, p. 51, "August 15, Thursday .......Another company mustered today was Captain Robert Campbell's militia of the Porter battalion. His Second Lt. was James Walker; the Privates were ....John Perry." Why he decided to emigrate to Missouri remains a mystery. He was already getting on in years in 1800 and one would think he would be through making big moves. He was obviously a courageous man and an adventuring one, however, and perhaps he took after his Grandfather Watson who undertook an ocean voyage to find a new home when he was 104 years old! He might have wanted to find more land and new opportunites for his children. The Governor of the Louisiana Territory, Baron Carondelet, had a generous policy of land donation to settlers. More generous than that of the British because he hoped to form a barrier of settlers against the British Canadians. John and his family may have been tired of packing goods across the mountains and perhaps some of those goods were whiskey. After whiskey started being taxed by the United States Government, he might have decided to move to new territory where there was little government. Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania was the hotbed of the Whiskey Rebellion in the late 1700's. There is nothing to indicate the Perrys took part in the Rebellion, but there is every reason to believe they resented the tax on whiskey when rich Eastern planters paid no tax at all on their goods. In addition, Missouri was Spanish Territory with little government and no taxes! The old family stories always said the Perrys were merchants. The one story told over and over was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. They drank the whiskey and sold the beans - - and they were in business." I'm sure, however, they sold at least part of the whiskey! The Perrys might also have been drawn to Missouri because they heard all the speculation of rich lead deposits and possibly silver and gold. That is what attracted Moses Austin to Mine A Breton in the late 1700's. Perhaps all these reasons drew them to Missouri. The Perrys were movers and doers. Ready and willing to take risks to improve their fortunes. As one historian put it "Freedom in America included the freedom to go." And the Perrys went. The pull of new country and new opportunities pulled them like a magnet and they couldn't resist it. Whatever the reasons, John and Violette Moore Perry and their children, along with their son-in-law, John P. McGuire and possibly their grand daughter, Rachel McGuire, set off across the Cumberland Gap. Along the famous Cumberland Road they went through Louisville, Kentucky and Vincennes, Indiana to St. Louis. They may have stopped in Vincennes for a while. Mrs. Eleanor Bauer's letter to Sam Richeson states that she thought John lived there for a while. Mary Perry, called Polly, married William Small in Vincennes. In addition, Mr. Albert Love's Family Tree of the Dunklins says Rachel McGuire came to Missouri from Pennsylvania via Vincennes. Regardless, they all proceeded to St. Louis at some point in the late 1790's, except William & Polly Small. Historians in printed sources today still differ as to the dates when the Perrys first bought or received land grants in Missouri. Family tradition says that they came in 1795. Historian dates vary from 1800 to 1806. Paul Richeson's search of early land claims didn't clarify it any further. However, family tradition and early Missouri territorial records indicate that the Perrys came at the time of the Austins or soon after when Missouri was still a Spanish Territory. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1804, Missouri became a part of the "Territory of Louisiana." Mine A Breton was part of one of the original Spanish governing districts, the District of St. Genevieve, which became a "county" of the "Territory of Louisiana." It is at this point the first official records of the Perrys in Missouri occur. SOURCE FOR FOLLOWING NARRATIVE: THE PERRYS OF POTOSI "A Time To Triumph" prepared and given as a speech by Paul R. Richeson, Potosi, Missouri, for the Perry Family Reunion, Brazoria, Texas, June 18, 1977. In 1804, John Perry Sr. was appointed assessor of "Big River, The Mines, Belleview and the Murphy Settlement" by the St. Genevieve Court of Quarter Sessions. In 1805, John Perry Sr. was a Judge of the Court of Quarter Sessions. These early appointments to these positions of responsibilty suggest John Perry Sr. had been a well-known and respected citizen in the territory for at least some time before these dates. This would date his arrival back into the Spanish period. In 1806 the record of John Perry Sr. buying the Spanish grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, appears. The grant included six acres of ground and a "cabin" which became the Perry-Dunklin-McGready house, as well as the site of the Richeson house and the Perry-Dunklin-McGready Family Cemetery. "When Washington County was first settled, it had been the hunting grounds of the Shawnee, Delaware, Osage, and Kickapoo Indian tribes. ..............The original village of Mine-a-Breton (now part of Potosi through which the creek flows) gradually came into existence before the close of the century and the several lots of the same consisted of what are known as "Spanish Grants," which were concessions of land made by the Spanish Government to individual settlers. Adjoining the village, grants were also made to individuals for large tracts, one of which, consisting of 639 acres, was obtained by Basil Valle, who built a cabin between the years of 1792-1795 and cleared six acres in 1796. This tract lies south of and includes a portion of the old village of Mine-a-Breton. It was sold by Valle to John Perry who settled upon it and was one of the most prominent of the early settlers." SOURCE: THE HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, JEFFERSON, WASHINGTON, CRAWFORD, AND GASCONADE COUNTIES OF MISSOURI, published by Goodspeed, 1880. Here John Perry and his family settled and set up business with their "barrel of beans and barrel of whiskey." The "Valle cabin" became the home, store, and probably tavern. of John Sr. and his son Samuel. Next door, between home and cemetery site, another Perry store was later built and operated by John Sr.'s two younger sons, William Moore Perry and John Jr. Perry. Mine a Breton was a boom town on the frontier and the Perry's mercantile and trading posts and taverns prospered. They were the merchant men who kept the supplies for the booming mining settlements and for the frontier beyond. They also entered some mining claims of their own. They dug lead themselves and bartered for lead and furs, etc. at their stores. They shipped the lead and furs down the Mississippi to sell and then they bought goods. They brought the goods back to sell at their stores and they invested their profits in more mining lands, etc and bought more goods. It wasn't always easy, however. There was always the risk of a river disaster in which the boat and cargo would sink and possibly lives would be lost as well. River pirates were also a constant threat. The Perrys and Mine a Breton prospered and the Perry sons became civic and political leaders in this new frontier. John Perry Sr. and Violette were near the end of their lives. Violette died in 1815. John Sr. was still active enough, however, to attempt a river trip to New Orleans in 1812 and survive the sinking of the boat and the loss of all the cargo. The Fourth of July celebrations were the major social occasions on the frontier with ceremonial speaking and toast-drinking. In 1813 Col. John Perry was the vice-president of the ceremonials in Potosi where 18 toasts were drunk. In 1816 he was president of the celebration and 20 toasts were drunk. Col. Perry was evidently one of the last surviving Revolutionary War veterans in the area and in his declining years. A major toast of the day paid tribute to him and the other "surviving heroes of the Revolution." As far as religion goes, all family stories indicate that the Perrys were Presbyterians. Most of the Scotch Irish were Presbyterians and they left Northern Ireland in such large numbers in the 1700s because of religious persecution and being thrown off the land. From the Missouri Gazette, October 12, 1816, comes the following article: "September 10, 1816, a number of respectable inhabitants of the county (Washington Co., MO) met for the purpose of forming a Bible Society. Rev. Solomon Giddings was chosen as the temporary chairman and Andrew Scott, scribe of the permanent organization. COL. JOHN PERRY was chosen President; Robert M. Stevenson, Vice President; Andrew Scott, Secretary; and Robert C. Bruffey, Treasurer. In addition Directors named were Wm. Sloan, JOHN PERRY JR., George McGahan, ISRAEL MCGREADY, JOHN MCILVAIN, JOHN BRICKEY, Joseph McCormac. From the "History of the Bellevue Presbyterian Church," organized August 3, 1816, comes the following quotation regarding the above Bible Society: "Besides the three Bellevue Presbyterian Church elders, Mr. Perry, Sr. and Mr. McGready were known Presbyterians." Finally, in 1824 John Perry Sr. died and was buried in the family cemetery. His stone is a flat granite slab 6 ft. 2 inches by 3 feet laid over the grave and resting on brick 'pillows." On it is found the following inscription: JOHN PERRY Died March 1st, 1824 In The 78th Year Of His Age His will was admitted for probate on May 10, 1824 and is in the Probate Court records of Washington County. A copy of his will is in the Perry Family Book. Records of Washington County show his will was dated November 23, 1819. More About JOHN PERRY:Fact 1: Left homestead near Mercerburg & went westFact 2: Settled at Sewickley, Westmoreland Co, PAFact 3: Engaged in milling & merchandisingFact 4: Returned to Franklin Co. & married Violette MoorFact 5: He & James pioneers of Monongahela Valley.Fact 6: Shipped 1st cargo of flour by Ohio & MississippiFact 7: 1778, Rivers to New Orleans. Lt. Col in Rev. War.Fact 8: Moved to location on Turtle Cr, West. Co., PAFact 9: Abt. 1800, Moved to MO with familyFact 10: 1804, Appt. assessor of Big River, The Mines, BellevueFact 11: 1805, & Murphy Settlement. Appt. judge of qrt.sessionsFact 12: 1806, Bought Spanish land grant of Basil Valle & cabinFact 13: 1824, Died Potosi & buried in family cemeteryNotes for VIOLETTE MOORE:All we know about Violette is that she is buried in the old Perry Family Cemetey in the corner lot of the old Perry house on Jefferson Street (Bearfoot). Tombstone Inscription: VIOLETTE PERRY Died October 25, 1815 In The 58th Year of Her Age She is buried next to her husband, John. Children of JOHN PERRY and VIOLETTE MOORE are: 10. i. MARY3 PERRY, b. Abt. 1779. 11. ii. ISABELLA PERRY, b. Abt. 1780, Pennsylvania; d. Abt. 1808. 12. iii. SAMUEL PERRY, b. January 25, 1783, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. December 12, 1830, Potosi, Washington County, Missouri. iv. WILLIAM MOOR(E) PERRY, b. 1784, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; d. September 17, 1825, Washington County, Missouri.
  16. Source: #S-2075918444 Page: John's Life (Facts and Fiction) Data: Date: 11 Sep 2011 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25077127/person/1615376847/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Note: Submitted by H. Lyle Perry Data: Text: It is my belief that John was the fourth son of Samuel and Annis. He was born in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania area where his father, mother and brothers Oliver, Samuel Jr. and William had moved so as to avoid Indian hostilities. Little is known of his early years but he did welcome two addittional brothers (James, 1750 and David, 1752) into the family. He was only 10 years old when his father was killed by the Indians. I believe he married a woman by the name of Penelope in 1970 at the age of 24. On April 2, 1770 we find John buying land in West-Moreland County, Pa. from a Mr. Arthur McNeal of Massachusetts. This land was in the vicinity of Fort Pitt. He sold this tract of land to his mother and brother Samuel on 13 Oct 1772. I believe he left Pennsylvania in 1774 with his wife Penelope and young three year old daughter Nancy and moved into what was to become the Louisiana Territory. He was probably drawn to this area because land grants were being dispensed freely. John settled his family on 200 acres on Bayou Castang, a small bayou which empties into the northern part of Lake Pontchartrain. In his application for the land grant (approved in 1775) he indiciated he had four family members-Himself, Wife, Nancy and Samuel. His land was in what was also called the "District of Manchac." He saw his son Thomas William born in 1776. He also saw his wife (Penelope) die of Yellow Fever in 1777. He also saw the area fall into the hands of the Spanish Government. The Spanish encouraged the "Acadians in exile" to move into the district, which did not set well with John so he decided to relocate to the Natchez area. John applied for a land grant and received a grant for 1,000 acres on Bayou Pierre, about 45 miles northeast of Fort Panure. As tension grew between the USA and Spain, John probably foresaw a lot of uncertainty so he packed up his family and moved back to the Pennsylvania area where he had family and friends. He later sold his grant of land to George Cochran of Natchez on 4 December 1798 for 0 .I believe John may have moved back to Pennsylvania in the year 1778 and married a woman called Violette Moore that year. He would have been 32 years old. He and Violette (a cousin to Hannah, wife of James, John's brother) had six children. I think he went into the milling and merchandising business. It is believed he lost his business after an entire shipment was seized by the Spanish in Baton Rouge, La. Although there are no records which indicate the Perrys took place in the Whiskey Rebellion of Western Pennsylvania in 1794 it may have played a part in John's decision to move to the Missouri Territory. One story that I found was that "The Perrys came to Missouri with a barrel of beans and a barrel of whiskey. Being Scot merchants, they drank the whiskey and sold the beans--they were in business." I'm sure however, they sold a least part of the whiskey. When they arrived in still in doubt but it was probably between 1795 and 1804. A official record records that John purchased the Spanish land grant of Basil Valle, a French miner, in 1806. This grant included six acres of ground and a cabin. This settlement was known as "Mine a Breton". (The source of this info is The History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford, and Gasconade Counties of Missouri, published by Goodspeedm 1880).The Perrys and the settlement prospered and John's children became civic and political leaders. Violette died in 1815. John died in 1824. His headstone is engraved with these words: John Perry, died March 1, 1824, In the 78th Year Of His Age.Note: Although I do not have "Absoulte Proof" I believe I am a direct desendant of John's and Penelope's son Thomas William Perry, (born 1776, District of Manchac, Louisiana Territory).









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On May 27, 2012 at 03:09GMT Lisa Miller wrote:

This John Perry MAY NOT be my ancestor! It is true that he and his brother James were running flatboats up and down from Pittsburgh to New Orleans all through the late 1700's, BUT I find no records of him in relation to these children; just with his other wife, Violette Moore, and her children in Missouri. He DID have a will but this Louisiana family is not in it. Did he abandon them entirely? And to whom? The youngest was an infant when Penelope died and just barely a toddler when he married Violette.




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