Profile Manager

Categories: WikiTree Help

Contents

What is a Profile Manager?

The Profile Manager has primary responsibility for a WikiTree profile.

For modern profiles, the manager is a privacy steward. The Profile Manager sets the Privacy Level and manages the Trusted List.

For older profiles, the manager is a leader for the genealogical collaboration.

Does the Profile Manager own the profile?

No. See the page on ownership and control.

Does the Profile Manager get to decide what's true and what isn't?

No. Since all descendants have to share to same ancestor profile the Profile Manager needs to seek consensus. They should see themselves as a leader and try to resolve conflicts through clear communication and careful use of sources.

How is being the Profile Manager different from being on the profile's Trusted List?

Profile Managers:

  1. Receive merge proposals via e-mail.
  2. Receive Trusted List requests via e-mail.
  3. Receive notices about comments posted on the profile via e-mail.
  4. Can delete inappropriate comments and memories.
  5. Can adjust the Privacy Level.
  6. Can add and remove other managers.

In all other ways, the manager is just like everyone else on the Trusted List. Everyone on the Trusted List has the power to edit and merge, and gets alerted to changes to the profile through their activity feeds.

The Profile Manager role isn't about power. It's about leadership. The manager is expected to lead in the protection and improvement of the profile. If they're currently unable or unwilling to lead, it's best that they let someone else manage the profile.

Setting or changing the Profile Manager

When you create a new profile you are set as the Profile Manager.

To add or replace managers, click the Privacy tab on a profile.

To change many profiles at once, use the Profile Manager Changes tool.

Can you have multiple Profile Managers? If so, many?

There can be more than one manager for a profile. If two profiles are merged, the managers of the merged profiles become managers of the new combined profile.

It's best that no profile have more than a few managers. Four or five is too many.

What if you want to reduce your management responsibility?

Managing profiles, especially those shared by many descendants, can be a big responsibility.

Even the most active WikiTreers can't manage more than a couple thousand profiles. Less active members may only want to manage a few hundred.

This doesn't mean you can't contribute to the profiles. You can collaborate on a profile as a member of the Trusted List without leading the collaboration as the Profile Manager.

Simply go to the Profile Manager Changes tool and do the following:

  • Select the "remove" option.
  • Enter your own e-mail address.
  • Click "select all" or select the profiles or family lines you don't want to manage.

You will not be removed from Trusted Lists (use the Trusted List Changes tool if that's what you want to do). And you will not be removed as the manager of private profiles if there is no other manager to watch over them.

There's nothing wrong with giving up management. This will enable other members to step up and do more.

Profile Managers for active user profiles

There are special rules regarding active profiles, i.e. profiles for living people who are users of WikiTree.

If you create a profile for a friend or family member and then invite them to join you on WikiTree by adding their e-mail address to their profile, they will replace you as the Profile Manager when they accept your invitation.

An active user can add other Profile Managers to their profile. This may be appropriate if they want to let a Wiki Genealogist manage the privacy controls here.

Although an active user can add other managers, they must always remain a manager of their own profile.

Unresponsive Profile Managers

Profile Managers who don't respond to private messages and merge proposals are a big problem on WikiTree.

If you can't reach the manager of a profile, see Unresponsive Profile Managers.

This page was last modified 11:43, 31 December 2013. This page has been accessed 20,506 times.