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Aeldert Hymanse Roosa

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Aeldert Hymanse Heymans "Aldert" Roosa aka Roose,
Born about in Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, Netherlandsmap
Husband of — married in Herwijnen,Gelderland,The Netherlandsmap
Died in Hurley, Ulster, New York, USAmap
Last profile change on 20 October 2014
14:57: Liz Shifflett edited the Biography for Aeldert Hymanse Roosa. (removed Merge Pending category / added Messy NNS Biography category) [Thank Liz for this]
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Categories: NNS | New Netherland Settlers | Messy NNS Biography.


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Contents

Biography

Parents

HEYMAN ROOSA.

Name

ALBERT HEYMANSE ROOSA, b. 1610, Herwyens, Gelderland, Holland; d. 27 February, 1678/79, Hurley, Ulster, NY.
ALBERT HEYMANSE ROOSA (HEYMAN1) was born 1610 in Herwyens, Gelderland, Holland, and died 27 February, 1678/79 in Hurley, Ulster, NY.

Marriage

He married WYNTJE ARIENS DEJONGE 1642, daughter of ADRIAN DEJONGE and MARIA.
Children of ALBERT ROOSA and WYNTJE DEJONGE are:
  1. JANNETJE ROOSA.
  2. HEYMAN ALDERSE ROOSA, b. 1643.
  3. ARIEN ALBERTSEN ROOSA, b. 1645, Holland.
  4. JAN ROOSA, b. 1651, Netherlands; d. Hurley, Ulster, NY.
  5. MARY ALDRIES ROOSA, b. 1652, Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland.
  6. NEELTJE ROOSA, b. 1652, Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland.
  7. GUERT ROOSA, b. 15 June, 1663.

Biography

Name

Name: Aldert Heymans /ROOSA/[1][2]
Name: Aeldert Hymanse /Roosa/[3]
Alias: Aldert Roosa Aldert Heyamnsen Albert Roosa

Birth

Birth:
Date: 1621
Place: Herwijnen/Herwynen, Gelderland, Netherlands[4]
Birth:
Date: BET 1610 AND 1618
Place: Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, Netherlands[5]

Imported only 1610 from Birth Date.

Marriage

Date: ABT 1642
Place: Herwynen, Gelderland, Holland
Date: ABT 1642
Place: Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, Netherlands[6]

Emigration

Emigration:
Date: 28 FEB 1660
Place: Herwijnen, Lingewaal, Gelderland, Netherlands[7]
Text: On February 28, 1660, he granted a Power of Attorney to Adriaen D'Jong(De Jongh), a brother of his wife, to administer his lands and goodsin Holland as he had in mind "to transport himself with his familynext month to Nieuw Netherland."

Immigration

Immigration:
Date: 15 APR 1660
Place: New Amsterdam[8]

Death

Death:
Date: 27 FEB 1678
Place: Hurley, Ulster, NY
Note: 1679?[9][10]
Death:
Date: 27 FEB 1679
Place: Hurley, Ulster, New York, USA[11]

Notes

Born in Herynen, Gelderland, Netherlands on 1625 to Heyman Roosa and Metje G Deroos. Albert Heymans married Wyntie Ariens De Jonge and had 10 children. He passed away on 1679 in Kingston, New York, USA.
ROOSA NAME MEANING
Dutch: from a personal name Rosart, formed with Rosa ÔroseÕ + the Germanic element hard ÔhardyÕ, ÔbraveÕ.
Ancestry.com

Note

"Albert Heymanse (Albert, son of Heyman) Roosa was a farmer, of Gelderland, Holland, where he married Wyntje Allard, and had eight children, born in the "vaderland." He came with his entire family to America in the ship "Spotted Cow," arriving at New Amsterdam, April 15, 1660. He made permanent settlement at Esopus, New York, shortly afterward. He was a person of more than usual importance, for on May 16, 1661, he was appointed by Governor Stuyvesant one of the three "schepens" or magistrates, his associates being Evert Pels and Cornelis Barentse Slecht. He brought with him from Holland considerable property and soon "occupied an influential position inthe new settlement." In 1661, he was appointed one of the three commissioners to enclose the new village at Esopus called Hurley. At the destruction of the village of Hurley, June 7, 1663, by the Indians, two of his children, with forty-three other women and children, were taken captive. The story of the rescue of these captives by the colonial forces under command of Captain Martin Kreiger is one of the most interesting episodes in the early history of New York. The records cite many instances of his participation in the early making of Kingston that show him to have been a leader. He rebelled against the tyrannies of Governor Nicholls, and in 1667, a commission appointed by the governor sat at Esopus, investigating the "Mutiny at Esopus." Albert Heymanse Roosa, Cornelis Barentsen Schlect and two others "were found guilty of rebellious and mutinous riot and were taken to New York for sentence. Nicholls by advice of his council on May 3, sentenced Roosa to be banished for life out of the government, and the others for shorter terms out of Esopus, Albany and New York. All these sentences were subsequently modified and the offenders returned to Esopus." Governor Lovelace restored him to favor, and in 1669 appointed him overseer of the town of Hurley, called New Dirp [Dorp?], or New Village. "In 1673, he was confirmed as one of the officers at Esopus by Governor Anthony Calve, and described as Captain Albert Heymans Roosa, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667." He served in the military forces of the colony as mustering officer, and in other capacities; was sergeant of Captain Henry Pawling's company, and in 1673 was captain of a company recruited from Hurley and Marbletown. He died at Hurley, February 27, 1679. In 1685 his widow, Wyntje Allard, secured a grant of three hundred and twenty acres at Hurley." [12]

Sources

  • Source S176: Title: Unsourced
  • Source S25: Author: ed. Hoes, Roswell Randall: Title: Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston,Ulster, New York, 1660-1809: Publication: Name: De Winne Press, 1891;: NOTESource Medium: Book
  • Source S62: Author: Reynolds, Cuyler: Title: Hudson and Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs: Publication: Name: New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911: Repository: #R4: Call Number: R 929.1 R45: NOTESource Medium: Book: Repository R4: Name: Schenectady County Public Library: Address:
  • Source: S403 Type: Web Site Author: pcstammy Title: mize family tree URL: Ancestry.com Data Changed: Date: 6 APR 2010
  • Source: S413 Type: Book Periodical: The Roosevelt Genealogy, 1649-1902 Data Changed: Date: 26 DEC 2010

Acknowledgments

  • This person was created through the import of 124-DeCoursey.ged on 13 September 2010.
  • This person was created through the import of MacEntee_Richard_2010-11-01.ged on 02 November 2010.
  • WikiTree profile Roosa-152 created through the import of My Family File.ged on Nov 16, 2011 by Lance Foster.
  • WikiTree profile Roosa-174 created through the import of LJM Family File 10.1.ged on Oct 28, 2012 by Vivian Kahn.

Biography

Parents' Marriage

Husband: Heymen Gijsberts Roosa
Wife: Eyke Jan Kuijstendr
Child: Albert* Heymanse Roosa
Marriage: [13]

Name

Name: Albert* Heymanse /Roosa/ [14]
Name: Aeldert Heymansz /Roosa/ [15]

Found multiple versions of NAME. Using Albert* Heymanse /Roosa/ .

Birth

Birth:
Date: BET 1610 AND 1618
Place: Herwijnen, Netherlands[16][17]

Imported only 1610 from Birth Date and marked as uncertain.

Marriage

Husband: Albert* Heymanse Roosa
Wife: Wyntjen Arianse DeJonge
Child: Jan Aldertse Roosa
Marriage:
Date: 1642
Place: Herwijnen, Netherlands[18]

Emigration

Emigration:
Date: 1660
Note: on the Bonte Koe (Spotted Cow)[19]

Death

Death:
Date: 27 FEB 1679
Place: Hurley, Ulster County, NY[20][21]

Note

Note: A great deal of information is available about this family at the websites cited.
Source: #S424
Page: http://www.oud-ophemert.nl/herwijnen/Roza_GN_Eng.html
Source: #S424
Page: http://www.hopefarm.com/roosa.htm

Sources

  • Source S284: Title: LDS data: Abbreviation: LDS data
  • Source S321: Title: New York Genealogical & Biographical Record: Bible of the Southward-Southard family of Ghent, Volume: 86:197: Abbreviation: NYG&B Record: Southard bible: Publication: 1955
  • Source S349: Title: Ulster County Wills: Abbreviation: Ulster County Wills: Author: Anjou
  • Source S424: Title: Web page: Abbreviation: Web page: Publication: various
  • Source S504: Title: DeRo(o)sa's van Herwijnen: Abbreviation: De Roosa Family History: Author: Engel Roza: Publication: ISBN 90-90179114-3, (in Dutch), 2004

Source Notes

  1. Source: #S403
  2. Source: #S413
  3.  : Source: #S62
  4. Source: #S403
  5.  : Source: #S62
  6.  : Source: #S176
  7.  : Source: #S176
    Data:
  8.  : Source: #S62
  9. Source: #S403
  10. Source: #S413
  11.  : Source: #S25
  12. Reynolds, Cuyler, Hudson and Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company,1911).
  13.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  14.  : Source: #S284
    Page: Pedigree Resource File, Disk 1
  15.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  16.  : Source: #S284
    Page: Pedigree Resource File, Disk 1
  17.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  18.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  19.  : Source: #S424
    Page: http://www.oud-ophemert.nl/herwijnen/Roza_GN_Eng.html
  20.  : Source: #S321
    Page: Vol. VXXI, pp. 163-166, 235-237
  21.  : Source: #S349
    Page: Vol. I, p. 74

Acknowledgments

  • This person was created through the import of MASTER2011WIKITREE.GED on 27 January 2011. The following data was included in the gedcom. You may wish to edit it for readability.
Prior to import, this record was last changed 18 JUN 2009 .
  • WikiTree profile Roosa-148 created through the import of My Family File.ged on Nov 16, 2011 by Lance Foster. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Lance and others.
Prior to import, this record was last changed 12 FEB 2008.

New Netherland Merge Pending|signature=Mix-216 15:47, 20 August 2014 (EDT) Mix-216 19:06, 14 June 2014 (EDT)


Mix-216 20:14, 16 May 2014 (EDT)


Biography

ALEARDT, Aldert or Albert Heymanse Roose came to this country from Harwyen, also spelled Herweyen, in Gelderland, Holland, on Waal river, five miles west of Bommel. Or it may be the present Heywennen, a short distance east of Bommel in Gelderland or the present Herwen in Gelderland twelve miles sontheast of Arnhem. With him came his wife, Wyntje (Lavinia) Allard or Ariens, and eight children in the ship Bontekoe (Spotted Cow), Captain Peter Lucas April 15, 1660; and settled in the Wildwyck district of Esopus, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York. Of these eight children: Heyman, born in 1643, married Maritje Roosevelt. Arie, born in 1645, married Maria Pels. Jan, bom in 1651, married Hellegond Williamse Van Buren. lkee or Aaghe married Dr. Roelof Kiersted. Maritje married Laurens Jansen. Neeltje married Hendrick Pawling after Nov. 3, 1676. Jannetje married Mattys TenEyck at Hurley Nov. 16, 1679. Aert. Two other children were born to him and his wife after coming to New Netherland, viz; Annatje and Guert.

From the fact that in Gelderland at the present time the language of its people is interspersed with Spanish words and idioms it has been supposed that many religious refugees from Spain during the first years of the Inquisition settled in this particular Province of Holland, among whom may have been ancestors of Albert Heymanse; if so, this can account for the spelling of the name, by the Hollanders-Roose -which to them would produce the same sound as Rosa, his name in Spanish.

On December 25, 1660, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and his wife, with Anna Blom, Jacob Joosten, Jacob Burhans, Mathias Blanchan and wife, Anton Crespel and wife, Andries Barentse and wife, Margaret Chambers, Gertruy Andries, Roelof Swartwout and wife, and Cornelise Sleght and wife participated in the first administration of the Lord's Supper at the Esopus or Wildwyck. Aldert Heymanse Roosa was a wealthy man for those days, bringing with him considerable property from Holland, and he speedily occupied an influential position in the early making of Kingston, in all of which he appeared as a leader and director of events. On the fourth of March, 1661, he joined with Thomas Chambers, Cornelis Barentse Sleght. Gertruy Andries, Roe of Swartwout and Jurian Westvael in a contract guaranteeing a salary to the Reverend Hermanus Blom, who had been called as pastor of the Dutch church at Wildwyck. Of this church he was for many years an elder; and because of the energy with which Domine Blom and he sought to conserve the surplus of the estates of deceased parents for the benefit of the poor of the village he was sometirnes called " the consistory " of the church.

On the 5th day of May, 1661, Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentse Sleght and Aldert Heymanse Roosa were appointed commissaries at Wildwyck and took their oath of office, and on the 16th day of the same month Peter Stuyvesant, in behalf of the Mighty Lords, the States General of the United Netherlands, and the Lord Directors of the Privileged West India Company granted its first charter to Wildwyck, in which Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentse Sleght and Aldert Heymanse Roosa were appointed schepens, and therein designated as '- interested, intelligent persons, possessing Real Estate, peaceable men, professors of the Reformed religion as it is now preached in the, United Netherlandish Churches in conformity through the Word of God, and the orders of the Synod of Dordrecht." And new lots were then laid out at Wildwyck, Of which Aldert Hymanse Roosa was allotted No. 24 and his son Jan No. 30.

On April 6th, 1662 permission was given by the Director-General to lay out a new village at the Esopus. It was called Nieuw Dorp, now Hurley, at which place Matthew Blanshan and his sons-in-law, Anthony Crespel and Louis DuBois settled the same year. Directly after this warnings were received and sent to New Amsterdam of pending troubles from the Indians at the Esopus. [22] On the 11th of October, 1662, Aldert Heymanse Roosa was commissioned to proceed to New Amsterdam to obtain one hundred pounds of powder and two hundred pounds of lead for the protection of the old and new settlements. [23]

Aldert Heymanse Roosa must have been among the earliest settlers of the new village because on March 30, 1663, he, Jan Joosten and Jan Garretsen were appointed by Director-General Stuyvesant commissaries to lay out and fortify it with palisades for protection against attacks of savages. [24]

On the 7th of April, 1663, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and his fellow commissaries reported to Governor Stuyvesant that the savages would not allow the building of palisades or fortifications at the new village, because the land was not included in the treaty made with them in the year 1660, and had not been fully paid for; and praying that the gifts promised the savages the previous autumn be sent at once, and that the new place and village be assisted with a few soldiers and ammunitions of war, at least, until the new settlement should be put into a proper state of defense and inhabited by a good number of people; that 'your humble and faithful subjects may remain without fear and molestation from these barbarous people, and with some assurance for the peaceful, undisturbed and unhindered continuation of the work begun, for if rumors and warnings may be believed, it would be too anxious, if not too dangerous an undertaking for your humble petitioners and faithful subjects to continue and advance their work otherwise." [25]

These warnings were not heeded and these earnest requests were not complied with, and on June 7th, 1663, the Indians attacked the New Village and Wildwyck. At Wildwyck they burned twelve dwelling houses; murdered eighteen persons, men, women and children, and carried away ten persons more as prisoners. The New Village was burned to the ground and its inhabitants mostly taken prisoners or killed. Only a few of them escaped to Wildwyck, among wnom were Roosa, Blanchan, Crespel and DuBois. So there were sixty-five persons missing in general, either killed or captured, besides nine pesons who came to Wildwyck, severely wounded. Among those taken prisoners at the New Village were the wife and two children of Louis DuBois; wife and one child of Anton Crespel; two children of Matthew Blanshan; two children of Aldert Heymanse Roosa and wife and three children of Lambert Huybertse Brink. [26]

An account of the massacre was sent to New Amsterdam on the 10th of June, and written instructions were received from the Director-General, under date of June 14th for the guidance of the officers at Wildwyck. Martial law was proclaimed and a council of war formed to consist of Ensign Niessen, Captain Chambers, Lieutenant Hendrick Jochem Schoonma ker of the Burgher Guard and the schout and commissaries of the village to deliberate and decide what might be necessary for the welfare of the village after the massacre. Mattys Capito was appointed secretary of the council. Aldert Hermanse Roosa was one of the commissaries. He was also corporal of the Burgher Guard of which Hendrick Jochem Schoonmaker was lieutenant.

Captain Martin Cregier reached Esopus on the 4th day of July, 1663, and proceeded to Wildwyck, where he found that the magistrates had examined some Esopus Indians and the wife of Dr Gysbert van Imbroeck, who had been a prisoner, and had practically located the place where the prisoners were held. On the 7th day of July, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and some other farmers, being indignant at the neglect of those in authority at New Amsterdam in sending them relief when requested in the early part of April, and sorely vexed at the delay of Captain Cregier in conducting the organization of the expedition against the Indians for the rescue of the prisoners, appeared armed before the council, who were examining two Wappinger Indians and upon being asked what they were doing there with their guns, gave answer: "We intend to shoot these Indians " Upon being told that they must not do that, they replied to Captain Cregier that they would do it, even if he stood by.

On July 26th an expedition about two hundred strong, of which one hundred and forty-five were inhabitants of Wildwyck, set out for the Indian "old fort" at Kerhonkson where the captives were reported to be. Reaching it on the 26th they found it deserted. Cregier destroyed about two hundred and fifteen acres of maize and burned about one hundred pits of corn and beans. A second expedition guided by a young Wappinger Indian started on September 3rd for the Indian entrenchment known as "new fort," which was situated in Shawangunk. Besides the troops, on this expedition, seven of the citizens of Wildwyck accompanied it. Although the names of the citizens are not given in Captain Cregier's report the seven, probably, were Matthew Blanshan, Louis DuBois, Anton Crespel, Cornelis Barentse Sleght, Tjerck Claesen DeWitt, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and Lambert Huybertse Brink, members of whose families were among the captives of June 7th, and each of whom must have accompanied either the first or second and, possibly, both expeditions.

Here at the "new fort" the Indians were attacked and a chief, fourteen warriors, four women and three children were killed, probably many others were wounded, who escaped. Of Cregier's forces three were killed and six wounded Twenty-three Christian prisoners were rescued. " New Fort" was situated in the town of Shawangunk on the east bank of the Shawangunk kill, two miles south of Bruynswick and twenty-eight miles from Kingston. [27]

After the Dutch had surrendered New Netherland to the English in 1664 and Richard Nicolls had become governor, Captain Daniel Brodhead, with a company of English soldiers was sent to Wildwyck. Against the arbitrary conduct of Captain Brodhead and the indignities put upon the Dutch settlers by the English soldiers, Aldert Heymanse Roosa led the revolt of the burghers in 1667 against the military authorities, which is referred to historical books as the " Mutiny at Esopus."

Marius Schoonmaker, in his history of Kingston, commenting on this revolt writes: Mutiny is resistance to the exercise of lawful power. If an officer invades the house of a subordinate to steal, commit an assault or a trespass, resistance is not mutiny; and much more, the moment a military officer or soldier steps outside of his military calling and wilfully commits an assault or a trespass against a citizen, or unlawfully deprives him of his liberty, the military character or privilege is at once doffed and thrown aside, and resistance is not mutiny. It was justifiable resistance to tyranny and oppression-an outburst of the same spirit which subsequently threw off the oppressor's yoke in 1776, and carried this country triumphantly through the Revolution.

For instigating this revolt Aldert Heymanse Roosa and other burghers were tried before Cornelis van Ruyven, one of the king's justices of the peace, and on May 3, 1667, he was sentenced to be banished from the colony for life, and a fine of one hundred bushels of wheat, or the value thereof, was levied on his estate in Esopus for charges of the Court; and his son Arie, Antonio Delba and Cornelis Barentse Sleght were banished out of Esopus, Albany and New York for shorter terms.

The report and findings of this trial show that the matter was prejudged under secret instructions to carry out private orders, and not governed by the merits or the evidence in the case. The trial however resulted in the suspension of Captain Brodhead from his command and in less than three months, on July 14th he died at Esopus leaving his widow and three sons -Daniel, Charles and Richard -- surviving him. [28]

The sentences of the burghers participating in this revolt were subsequently modified and Aldert Heymanse Roosa was permitted to retum to Wildwyck, and with Louis DuBois was appointed by Governor Francis Lovelace September 16th, 1669, overseer for Hurley. [29]

On the 30th day of March, 1670, he set over to Governor Lovelace eight acres of land as part of " the Transport" to satisfy the inhabitants of the town of Marbletown for the grant given to them under the authority of the governor (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 445). At this time he received a patent tor ten acres and four hundred and fifty rods at Hurley, and was commissioned sergeant of the militia directed to be present at the rendezvous at Marbletown April 5th, 1670.

On April 7th, 1670 he was appointed overseer of Hurley and Marbletown and on October 25th, 1671, in an order of Governor Lovelace " Regulating the Civil and Military affairs of Kingston," Aldert Heymanse Roosa was appointed commissary for Hurley, and the eldest commissary for Kingston. [30]

When Charles II. of England joined Louis XIV. of France in a compact to destroy Dutch freedom, war broke out again. In Holland the Dutch cut the dykes, put their country under water and drove out the French invaders. The news of a Dutch fleet approaching New York was received with joy and on the 7th of August, 1673, twenty three Dutch war-ships with 1,600 soldiers entered New York Bay and on the 9th of August the flag of Holland floated again over Manhattan, and Captain Anthony Colve was made governor. In this state of war delegates from Esopus, under date of September 1st,1673, presented a petition to the Dutch governor, praying that certain persons be appointed to govern the village of Esopus, formerly Wildwyck, then called Swanenburgh, Hurley and Marbletown, with a military organization and the necessary ammunition. The petition was granted on condition that no one should be nominated who was not of the Reformed religion, nor " who was not well inclined towards the Dutch nation." Aldert Heymans Roosa was on October 6th, 1673, appointed captain of Hurley and Marbletown by Governor Colve, and described as " Captain Aldert Heymans, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667." [31]

Name

Name: Aeldert Heymansen /Roosa/[32]
Aleardt Heymanse (Albert) "Aldert" Roosa

Birth

Born 1621 in Herweynen, Gelderland, Netherlands

Event

Event:
Type: Arrival
Date: 1620-1664
Place: New Netherland[33]
Bontekoe (Spotted Cow) Sailed on 15 April 1660 under Captain Pieter Lucasz from Amsterdam, Netherlands to Unknown Port.
1-10* Albert Heymans (Roosa), from Gelderland, agriculturist - and wife, Weilke de Jonge, and eight children ages 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15 and 17 years[34]

Death

Died February 27, 1679 in Hurley, Ulster, New York, USA

Sources

  • Source: S2329653885 Repository: #R2329641929 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Trees Note: Data: Repository: R2329641929 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Note:
Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=25823244&pid=334
  • Source: S2351072614 Repository: #R2329641929 Title: Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Author: Gale Research Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data - Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2010.Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenge Note:

Source Notes

  1. Source: #S403
  2. Source: #S413
  3.  : Source: #S62
  4. Source: #S403
  5.  : Source: #S62
  6.  : Source: #S176
  7.  : Source: #S176
    Data:
  8.  : Source: #S62
  9. Source: #S403
  10. Source: #S413
  11.  : Source: #S25
  12. Reynolds, Cuyler, Hudson and Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company,1911).
  13.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  14.  : Source: #S284
    Page: Pedigree Resource File, Disk 1
  15.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  16.  : Source: #S284
    Page: Pedigree Resource File, Disk 1
  17.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  18.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  19.  : Source: #S424
    Page: http://www.oud-ophemert.nl/herwijnen/Roza_GN_Eng.html
  20.  : Source: #S321
    Page: Vol. VXXI, pp. 163-166, 235-237
  21.  : Source: #S349
    Page: Vol. I, p. 74
  22. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 227-228).
  23. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., page 231.)
  24. (Sylvester's Hist. Ulster county, page 36).
  25. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 242-3).
  26. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. Xlll., pages 245-6, 256- 372).
  27. (Schoonmaker's Hist. of Kingston, page 39. OLDE ULSTER, Vol II, pages 1-9).
  28. (History of Kingston, page 57).
  29. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 436).
  30. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., pages 448, 450, 460).
  31. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 475. Vol. II., page 626 Report State Historian New York, Colonial Series (1896) page 384).
  32. Source: #S2351072614 Page: Place: New Netherland; Year: 1620-1664; Page Number: . Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1627996&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Arrival date: 1620-1664Arrival place: New Netherland
  33. Source: #S2351072614 Page: Place: New Netherland; Year: 1620-1664; Page Number: . Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1627996&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Arrival date: 1620-1664Arrival place: New Netherland
  34. Immigrant Ships: Bontekoe (Spotted Cow) Sailed on 15 April 1660

Acknowledgments

  • WikiTree profile Roosa-140 created through the import of Sherman Family Tree(1).ged on Jul 11, 2011 by Jerry Sherman. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Jerry and others.

New Netherland Merge Pending|signature=Mix-216 23:38, 3 October 2014 (EDT)

Biography

Name

Aldert Heymanse Roosa aka Roose[35]

Birth

Birth:
Date: 1610/1618
Place: Herwijnen,Gelderland,The Netherlands[36]

Imported only 1610 from Birth Date and marked as uncertain.

Marriage

Husband of Wyntie A. de Jongh — married 1642 in Herwijnen,Gelderland,The Netherlands

Marriage

Husband: Aldert Heymanse Roosa
Wife: Wyntje (Lavinia) Ariense de Jongh
  1. Child: Adriaen "Arie" Albertszen Roosa
  2. Child: Eyke Aelberts Roosa
  3. Child: Maritje Aldertse Roosa
  4. Child: Annatje Roosa
  5. Child: Gerrit Roosa
Marriage:
Date: 1642
Place: Herwijnen,Gelderland,The Netherlands[37][38]

Immigration

Immigration: 15 APR 1660 New Amsterdam, the Dutch Colony (colony renamed in 1664 to New York)

Death

Death:
Date: 27 Feb 1679
Place: Esophus,Hurley,Ulster,New York[39]

Note

Note: Death information from New York Gen. and Biog. Record, Vol. VXXI., pages 163-166, 235-237

Burial

Burial:
Place: Hurley,Ulster,New York[40]
from http://www.hopefarm.com/roosa.htm
(AIdert or Aleardt Heymanse Roosa)
ALEARDT, Aldert or Albert Heymanse Roose came to this country from Harwyen, also spelled Herweyen, in Gelderland, Holland, on Waal river, five miles west of Bommel. Or it may be the present Heywennen, a short distance east of Bommel in Gelderland or the present Herwen in Gelderland twelve miles southeast of Arnhem. With him came his wife, Wyntje (Lavinia) Allard or Ariens, and eight children in the ship Bontekoe (Spotted Cow), Captain Peter Lucas April 15, 1660; and settled in the Wildwyck district of Esopus, now Kingston, Ulster County, New York. Of these eight children: Heyman, born in 1643, married Maritje Roosevelt. Arie, born in 1645, married Maria Pels. Jan, bom in 1651, married Hellegond Williamse Van Buren. lkee or Aaghe married Dr. Roelof Kiersted. Maritje married Laurens Jansen. Neeltje married Hendrick Pawling after Nov. 3, 1676. Jannetje married Mattys TenEyck at Hurley Nov. 16, 1679. Aert. Two other children were born to him and his wife after coming to New Netherland, viz; Annatje and Guert.
From the fact that in Gelderland at the present time the language of its people is interspersed with Spanish words and idioms it has been supposed that many religious refugees from Spain during the first years of the Inquisition settled in this particular Province of Holland, among whom may have been ancestors of Albert Heymanse; if so, this can account for the spelling of the name, by the Hollanders-Roose -which to them would produce the same sound as Rosa, his name in Spanish.
On December 25, 1660, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and his wife, with Anna Blom, Jacob Joosten, Jacob Burhans, Mathias Blanchan and wife, Anton Crespel and wife, Andries Barentse and wife, Margaret Chambers, Gertruy Andries, Roelof Swartwout and wife, and Cornelise Sleght and wife participated in the first administration of the Lord's Supper at the Esopus or Wildwyck. Aldert Heymanse Roosa was a wealthy man for those days, bringing with him considerable property from Holland, and he speedily occupied an influential position in the early making of Kingston, in all of which he appeared as a leader and director of events. On the fourth of March, 1661, he joined with Thomas Chambers, Cornelis Barentse Sleght. Gertruy Andries, Roe of Swartwout and Jurian Westvael in a contract guaranteeing a salary to the Reverend Hermanus Blom, who had been called as pastor of the Dutch church at Wildwyck. Of this church he was for many years an elder; and because of the energy with which Domine Blom and he sought to conserve the surplus of the estates of deceased parents for the benefit of the poor of the village he was sometirnes called "the consistory" of the church.
On the 5th day of May, 1661, Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentse Sleght and Aldert Heymanse Roosa were appointed commissaries at Wildwyck and took their oath of office, and on the 16th day of the same month Peter Stuyvesant, in behalf of the Mighty Lords, the States General of the United Netherlands, and the Lord Directors of the Privileged West India Company granted its first charter to Wildwyck, in which Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentse Sleght and Aldert Heymanse Roosa were appointed schepens, and therein designated as "- interested, intelligent persons, possessing Real Estate, peaceable men, professors of the Reformed religion as it is now preached in the, United Netherlandish Churches in conformity through the Word of God, and the orders of the Synod of Dordrecht." And new lots were then laid out at Wildwyck, Of which Aldert Hymanse Roosa was allotted No. 24 and his son Jan No. 30.
On April 6th, 1662 permission was given by the Director-General to lay out a new village at the Esopus. It was called Nieuw Dorp, now Hurley, at which place Matthew Blanshan and his sons-in-law, Anthony Crespel and Louis DuBois settled the same year. Directly after this warnings were received and sent to New Amsterdam of pending troubles from the Indians at the Esopus. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 227-228). On the 11th of October, 1662, Aldert Heymanse Roosa was commissioned to proceed to New Amsterdam to obtain one hundred pounds of powder and two hundred pounds of lead for the protection of the old and new settlements. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., page 231.)
Aldert Heymanse Roosa must have been among the earliest settlers of the new village because on March 30, 1663, he, Jan Joosten and Jan Garretsen were appointed by Director-General Stuyvesant commissaries to lay out and fortify it with palisades for protection against attacks of savages. (Sylvester's Hist. Ulster county, page 36).
On the 7th of April, 1663, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and his fellow commissaries reported to Governor Stuyvesant that the savages would not allow the building of palisades or fortifications at the new village, because the land was not included in the treaty made with them in the year 1660, and had not been fully paid for; and praying that the gifts promised the savages the previous autumn be sent at once, and that the new place and village be assisted with a few soldiers and ammunitions of war, at least, until the new settlement should be put into a proper state of defense and inhabited by a good number of people; that 'your humble and faithful subjects may remain without fear and molestation from these barbarous people, and with some assurance for the peaceful, undisturbed and unhindered continuation of the work begun, for if rumors and warnings may be believed, it would be too anxious, if not too dangerous an undertaking for your humble petitioners and faithful subjects to continue and advance their work otherwise." (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 242-3).
These warnings were not heeded and these earnest requests were not complied with, and on June 7th, 1663, the Indians attacked the New Village and Wildwyck. At Wildwyck they burned twelve dwelling houses; murdered eighteen persons, men, women and children, and carried away ten persons more as prisoners. The New Village was burned to the ground and its inhabitants mostly taken prisoners or killed. Only a few of them escaped to Wildwyck, among whom were Roosa, Blanchan, Crespel and DuBois. So there were sixty-five persons missing in general, either killed or captured, besides nine pesons who came to Wildwyck, severely wounded. Among those taken prisoners at the New Village were the wife and two children of Louis DuBois; wife and one child of Anton Crespel; two children of Matthew Blanshan; two children of Aldert Heymanse Roosa and wife and three children of Lambert Huybertse Brink. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. Xlll., pages 245-6, 256- 372).
An account of the massacre was sent to New Amsterdam on the 10th of June, and written instructions were received from the Director-General, under date of June 14th for the guidance of the officers at Wildwyck. Martial law was proclaimed and a council of war formed to consist of Ensign Niessen, Captain Chambers, Lieutenant Hendrick Jochem Schoonmaker of the Burgher Guard and the schout and commissaries of the village to deliberate and decide what might be necessary for the welfare of the village after the massacre. Mattys Capito was appointed secretary of the council. Aldert Hermanse Roosa was one of the commissaries. He was also corporal of the Burgher Guard of which Hendrick Jochem Schoonmaker was lieutenant.
Captain Martin Cregier reached Esopus on the 4th day of July, 1663, and proceeded to Wildwyck, where he found that the magistrates had examined some Esopus Indians and the wife of Dr Gysbert van Imbroeck, who had been a prisoner, and had practically located the place where the prisoners were held. On the 7th day of July, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and some other farmers, being indignant at the neglect of those in authority at New Amsterdam in sending them relief when requested in the early part of April, and sorely vexed at the delay of Captain Cregier in conducting the organization of the expedition against the Indians for the rescue of the prisoners, appeared armed before the council, who were examining two Wappinger Indians and upon being asked what they were doing there with their guns, gave answer: "We intend to shoot these Indians " Upon being told that they must not do that, they replied to Captain Cregier that they would do it, even if he stood by.
On July 26th an expedition about two hundred strong, of which one hundred and forty-five were inhabitants of Wildwyck, set out for the Indian "old fort" at Kerhonkson where the captives were reported to be. Reaching it on the 26th they found it deserted. Cregier destroyed about two hundred and fifteen acres of maize and burned about one hundred pits of corn and beans. A second expedition guided by a young Wappinger Indian started on September 3rd for the Indian entrenchment known as "new fort," which was situated in Shawangunk. Besides the troops, on this expedition, seven of the citizens of Wildwyck accompanied it. Although the names of the citizens are not given in Captain Cregier's report the seven, probably, were Matthew Blanshan, Louis DuBois, Anton Crespel, Cornelis Barentse Sleght, Tjerck Claesen DeWitt, Aldert Heymanse Roosa and Lambert Huybertse Brink, members of whose families were among the captives of June 7th, and each of whom must have accompanied either the first or second and, possibly, both expeditions.
Here at the "new fort" the Indians were attacked and a chief, fourteen warriors, four women and three children were killed, probably many others were wounded, who escaped. Of Cregier's forces three were killed and six wounded. Twenty-three Christian prisoners were rescued. "New Fort" was situated in the town of Shawangunk on the east bank of the Shawangunk kill, two miles south of Bruynswick and twenty-eight miles from Kingston (Schoonmaker's Hist. of Kingston, page 39. OLDE ULSTER, Vol II, pages 1-9).


After the Dutch had surrendered New Netherland to the English in 1664 and Richard Nicolls had become governor, Captain Daniel Brodhead, with a company of English soldiers was sent to Wildwyck. Against the arbitrary conduct of Captain Brodhead and the indignities put upon the Dutch settlers by the English soldiers, Aldert Heymanse Roosa led the revolt of the burghers in 1667 against the military authorities, which is referred to historical books as the "Mutiny at Esopus."
Marius Schoonmaker, in his history of Kingston, commenting on this revolt writes: Mutiny is resistance to the exercise of lawful power. If an officer invades the house of a subordinate to steal, commit an assault or a trespass, resistance is not mutiny; and much more, the moment a military officer or soldier steps outside of his military calling and wilfully commits an assault or a trespass against a citizen, or unlawfully deprives him of his liberty, the military character or privilege is at once doffed and thrown aside, and resistance is not mutiny. It was justifiable resistance to tyranny and oppression-an outburst of the same spirit which subsequently threw off the oppressor's yoke in 1776, and carried this country triumphantly through the Revolution.
For instigating this revolt Aldert Heymanse Roosa and other burghers were tried before Cornelis van Ruyven, one of the king's justices of the peace, and on May 3, 1667, he was sentenced to be banished from the colony for life, and a fine of one hundred bushels of wheat, or the value thereof, was levied on his estate in Esopus for charges of the Court; and his son Arie, Antonio Delba and Cornelis Barentse Sleght were banished out of Esopus, Albany and New York for shorter terms.
The report and findings of this trial show that the matter was prejudged under secret instructions to carry out private orders, and not governed by the merits or the evidence in the case. The trial however resulted in the suspension of Captain Brodhead from his command and in less than three months, on July 14th he died at Esopus leaving his widow and three sons -Daniel, Charles and Richard -- surviving him (History of Kingston, page 57).
The sentences of the burghers participating in this revolt were subsequently modified and Aldert Heymanse Roosa was permitted to return to Wildwyck, and with Louis DuBois was appointed by Governor Francis Lovelace September 16th, 1669, overseer for Hurley (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 436).
On the 30th day of March, 1670, he set over to Governor Lovelace eight acres of land as part of "the Transport" to satisfy the inhabitants of the town of Marbletown for the grant given to them under the authority of the governor (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 445). At this time he received a patent for ten acres and four hundred and fifty rods at Hurley, and was commissioned sergeant of the militia directed to be present at the rendezvous at Marbletown April 5th, 1670.
On April 7th, 1670 he was appointed overseer of Hurley and Marbletown and on October 25th, 1671, in an order of Governor Lovelace "Regulating the Civil and Military affairs of Kingston," Aldert Heymanse Roosa was appointed commissary for Hurley, and the eldest commissary for Kingston (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., pages 448, 450, 460).
When Charles II of England joined Louis XIV of France in a compact to destroy Dutch freedom, war broke out again. In Holland the Dutch cut the dykes, put their country under water and drove out the French invaders. The news of a Dutch fleet approaching New York was received with joy and on the 7th of August, 1673, twenty three Dutch war-ships with 1,600 soldiers entered New York Bay and on the 9th of August the flag of Holland floated again over Manhattan, and Captain Anthony Colve was made governor. In this state of war delegates from Esopus, under date of September 1st, 1673, presented a petition to the Dutch governor, praying that certain persons be appointed to govern the village of Esopus, formerly Wildwyck, then called Swanenburgh, Hurley and Marbletown, with a military organization and the necessary ammunition. The petition was granted on condition that no one should be nominated who was not of the Reformed religion, nor "who was not well inclined towards the Dutch nation." Aldert Heymans Roosa was on October 6th, 1673, appointed captain of Hurley and Marbletown by Governor Colve, and described as "Captain Aldert Heymans, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667." (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 475. Vol. II., page 626 Report State Historian New York, Colonial Series (1896) page 384).
Aldert Heymanse Roosa died at Hurley, New York, February 27th 1679. (See New York Gen. and Biog. Record, Vol. VXXI., pages 163-166, 235-237. Anjous Ulster County Wills, Vol. I., page 74).
Available on CD-ROM: THE ROOSA FAMILY OF NORTH AMERICA, compiled by Lorraine Luke. For information on how to order and to see indices, please go to this website address: [1]��See Hoes 175, baptismal record for Aldert Rosa, that lists the death date of Albert Roosa.��Notes for future research. There was an early settler in Rensselaerswyck who may have had descendents that used the surname of Roos, Rosa.��- Name: Gerrit Theusz de Reux (de Reus)�- Sub-Heading: By den Soutberg. Sailed from the Texel shortly after July 20, 1632; arrived at New. Amsterdam in April 1633�- Comments: was engaged by the patroon as farmer on a farm to be established on Blommaerts kil, June 15, 1632, but had previously been in charge of a farm of the West India Company on the island of Manhattan. He sailed with four farm laborers by den Soutberg, which brought Wouter van Twiller to New Netherland. Before sailing, de Reux was appointed schepen of the colony. In April 1634, he had succeeded Roelof Jansz, from Masterland, on de Laets Burg. He died before Aug. 4, 1639.
Albert Heymans Roosa and Wyntje Ariens De Jongh
Albert [1] Heymans Roosa was the son of Heijmans Guijsberts and IJken Jans Kuijsten. He had at least two brothers, Jan and Govert, and one sister, Anneke. It was likely that he also had a brother named Gijsbert. Albert married Wyntje Ariens de Jongh. Wyntje was the daughter of Adriaen Meertensen de Jongh and Maijken --. She had two brothers, Marten and Govert, and three sisters, Aricken, Neelke, and Engelje. � Albert Heymans served as the burmeester of Herwijnen in 1655-6 [2]. On 16 Apr 1660, Albert, Wyntje, and eight of their children, ages 17 to 2, sailed from Amsterdam aboard de Bonte Koe, and settled in Wildwyck (later Kingston, Ulster, New York. Albert was listed as a farmer. Just over a year later, on 16 May 1661, Albert was chosen to be one of the three schepens of Wildwyck. He was reelected 27 April 1662. He was last mentioned as a commissary on 17 April 1663. In November and December of 1663, he was recorded in the Kingston court record as the Consistory. Albert was appointed 20 Apr 1665 as one of the persons who were to draw up the conditions for a cattle auction. He can be found many times in the court records and secretary's papers of Kingston serving in the capacity of arbitrator, appraiser, and a witness to transactions � In June of 1663, at the start of the Second Esopus War, a group of Native Americans attacked the village and took two of Albert and Wyntje's children prisoners. At least one of the children, Albert's eldest daughter, was held captive until the end of the year. During her captivity, Albert and another man reacted by threatening to shoot two Wappinger Indians who were being questioned by the Dutch and had been promised safety. He was accused of challenging a member of the court at Thomas Chambers' house on November 6, threatening to fight those who were friends to the Indians. Albert, however, denied the accusation. He was also brought to court for insulting a commissary over the issue of horses provided for the expedition against the Indians. � In April of 1664, the English annexed New Netherland. The Director General Peter Stuyvesant surrendered that September and the colony was soon renamed New York. Over the next several years, there were many conflicts between the Dutch and English. Albert was deeply involved in these conflicts. The first of these conflicts that the Roosas took part in took place over a canoe belonging to the family. He, his son Arien, and Ariaen Huyberts (probably the son of Neeltje, Wyntje's sister) became involved in a fight with three English soldiers on 18 November 1664. The soldiers had been asked to guard the canoe by the previous watch and Albert's group had come to claim it and use it for hunting. Albert's party did not speak enough English and the soldiers did not speak enough Dutch to be able to understand each other and a fight ensued. Albert, his son, and nephew were all fined by the court for their actions. � The Roosas quartered a soldier by the name of Daniel Butterwout. On 26 May 1665, Albert and Daniel had a quarrel and an order was made that Albert was to be arrested. As rumor spread through the village of the arrest, a riot started, ended peacefully. A number of the inhabitants were later questioned about their role in the riot, including Albert's son Ariaen and nephew Arien Huyberts, who both claimed to have been out for other reasons. � The next incident occurred on 28 April/3 May 1666, when Albert took a broken coulter (part of a plow) and went to the home of Louis Dubois to find the blacksmith to have it repaired. There were a number of inhabitants and soldiers drinking at the Dubois home. One of these soldiers, Francois Vreeman came out of the house and attacked Albert. Albert fought back, throwing part of the coulter at him and fighting him off with a stick. Four other soldiers joined the fight. Albert went underneath one soldier's sword and took hold of him but Albert was wounded by the other soldiers. Ariaen Huyberts testified that he tried to run to his uncle and was also attacked by the soldiers. He was arrested and said that one soldier beat him in the guardhouse. �
Governor Nicolls attempted to ease the tensions between burgher and soldier by replacing the garrison's commander at Kingston with one Captain Brodhead. Brodhead, however, only worsened the problem with his favoritism towards the soldiers and abusive behavior towards the Dutch. The Dutch openly rebelled when Henderick Cornelissen, the ropemaker, was killed by an English soldier and when Brodhead assaulted, then arrested Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, one of Albert's former colleagues. A large number gathered together in what became known as the Esopus Mutiny. The burghers refused to obey Brodhead's order to disperse and Brodhead, in turn, refused to listen to the magistrates' pleas to compromise peacefully by allowing Slecht to be tried in the burgher court. Afterwards, Nicolls wishing to keep control of his colony by making an example out of those who assembled, ordered the "principal Incendiaries" to be tried in Kingston and sent to New York City for sentencing. Albert and his son Ariaen were among these and were found guilty of "rebellious and mutinous Riot". In New York City, Nicolls felt the defendants were deserving of death but, at the advice of the Council and the petition of the inhabitants of Kingston, he gave these men a less drastic punishment. Albert, an apparent leader in the "mutiny", was given life banishment from the colony, as well as confiscation of property. Ariaen was given a shorter term of banishment out of Albany, New York, and the Esopus. Shortly afterwards, however, when the English possession of New Netherland was confirmed, Nicolls granted them amnesty. � Albert died 27 February 1678/9. An inventory was taken 30 April/ 10 May 1667 and his property included "a farm with its growing crops, a dwelling and a barn, seven heads of horses... eight heads of cattle..." Wyntje survived him as she appears as a witness to a grandchild's baptism and was listed as Albert's widow and she also appears as taking part in her husband's inventory.
Albert and Wyntje had these children [3]:
1. Arien Allertsen Roosa[4], married Maria Everts Pels.
2. Heiman Aldertse Roosa [5], married Anna Margriet Roosevelt [6], lived in Hurley, Ulster, New York, will dated 23 Aug 1708 and proved 9 Sep 1708.
3. Jan Aldertsse Roosa [7], married Hillegond Willems van Burren [8].
4. Eyke Alberts Rosa [9], married Roeloff Kierstede.
5. Marritje Aldrichs Roos [10], married Laurens Janszen.
6. Jannetje Rosa[11], born in Herwijnen, Ulster, New York, married Mattys ten Eyck 16 Nov 1679 in Hurley, Ulster, New York.
7. Neeltje Roosa [12], baptized 5 Nov 1655 in Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands, married Hendrick Paling in 1676 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.
8. Another child, born in the Netherlands. [13]
9. Guert Roosa, died as an infant, his parents had made arrangements for his baptism to take place 15 Jun 1664 in Kingston, Ulster, New York but he died shortly beforehand.
Sources: �1. Judicial Archives of Tuil, Folio 19 verso; folio 20 "Power of Attorney of Alardt Hemans to Adriaen Adriaenss, D'Jong" (See De Boer, Louis P., The New York Genealogical & Biographical Record, April 1927, pp. 149-150). �2. O'Callaghan, Edmund Bailey, The Documentary History of the State of New-York, Vol. 3. Albany: Weed, Parsons, 1851, .p. 56 �3. Tepper, Michael (ed.), List of Passengers 1654 to 1664 and Immigrants to the Middle Colonies). �4. Hoes, Roswell Randall (comp.), Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1997 (originally published by De Vinne Press (New York), 1891). �5. Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in the City of New York: Marriages. �6. O'Callahan, E. B. (comp.), Laws and Ordinances of New Netherland, 1638-1674, 1868. �7. Versteeg, Dingman, New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch: Kingston Papers, 2 vols., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1976. �8. Kregier, Capt. Martin, Journal of the Second Esopus War, 1663, as found in O'Callaghan, E.B., The Documentary History of the State of New York, Vol. IV, Albany: Charles Van Benthuysen, 1851. �9. Brodhead, John Romeyn, History of the State of New York, Vol. II, 1st Ed., New York: Harper & Brothers, 1871, pages 121-3. �10. Bennett, David Vernooy, "The First American Mrs. Rosencrans", New York Genealogical & Biographical Record, Vol. XC, No. 2, Apr 1959. �11. Anjou, Gustave, Ulster County, New York, Probate Records, 2 vols. �12. Van Maanen, R.H.C., "Bestuurders en dienaren binnen de heerlijkheid Herwijnen (1616) 1700-1800 (1809)", Gens Nostra, pgs. 33-36. �13. Index Kerkregisters Doop en Trouw, 1607-1681 (Herwijnen en Hellouw), (LDS Film 1743581).
Nederduitsch-Hervormde Gemeente te Herwijnen
No. 14
Doopakte d.d. 5 November 1655 �Kind: Neelken �Vader: Alert Heijmense �Moeder: Wiljlken Ariens de Jong �Getuigen: Arien Huijbertse, Neelke Ariens de Jong.
Source: Index Kerkregisters Doop en Trouw, 1607-1681 (Herwijnen en Hellouw), (LDS Film 1743581).
Elias Leeuw (Notary Public) declares that Alardt Heymans, yeoman at Herwynen, having in mind to transport himself with his family, next month to Nieuw Netherlands, appoints Adriaen Adriaenss, D'Jong, also at Herwynen, to manage, to administer and to guard in his name all his goods, houses, lands and acres, none excepted belonging to him at present, or still due to him through inheritance or otherwise; to give the same out in rent and lease for a certain term of years; to demand and to collect, to accept and to receive the annual income thereof, and all other proceedings as claims, credit, rents, etc., due to him, the constituent, now and of years past, as well as of years to come;-to give receipt for payments, and if necessary to use judicial compulsion upon the debtors. Further to act for him in all law suits which may result therefrom be it as plaintiff or defendant, before all lords, judges, courts and benches, or whosoever administers justice; to observe all the rules of justice and if demanded, to appoint other Powers-of-Attorney in his own place. � Further gives he, the constituent, to the said Adriaen Adriaenss complete and irrevocable power to sell the named goods, lands, acres and rights, to convey the property to the purchaser or purchasers, divesting, thereby him, the constituent, according to the laws of our city and country (Bommel), guaranteeing full transfer thereof with his person and goods as guarantee; to restitute to purchase the part of the rents due to him; to give legal receipt to the purchaser before the magistrate; to accept the purchase sums or interest on the installments, and also to give receipt thereof. �And further to do in, general all that which the constituent himself, if present, could or might do, even if in normal cases, the matter might require special personal instruction; the constituent hereby confirming the above stated appointment. � And the constituent promises hereby to maintain, and to cause to be maintained as legal and of value, all and everything done by the said Adriaen Adriaenss, D'Jong, or his substitutes, as if he had done and transacted the same himself, without protesting against it, either directly or indirectly either in or out of Court. All under guarantee of his person and his goods.
Source: Judicial Archives of Tuil, Folio 19 verso; folio 20 "Power of Attorney of Alardt Hemans to Adriaen Adriaenss, D'Jong" (See De Boer, Louis P., The New York Genealogical & Biographical Record, April 1927, pp. 149-150).
***
Note: #DWNLNOTE

Sources

  • Source: S20 Title: Internet Italicized: Y
  • Source: S67 Repository: #REPO5 Title: International Genealogical index Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Italicized: Y Paranthetical: Y Repository: REPO5 Name: Family History Library Address: 35 N. West Temple Street CONT Salt Lake City, Utah 84150 CONT USA CONT www.familysearch.org
  • Source: S75 Title: Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, NY, for One Hundred and Fifty Years Author: Hoes, Roswell Randall Publication: 1906 Text: The records for 1660-1675 are very limited. It's probable that the baptisms were recorded at the Albany Dutch Reformed Church. There were no records on file for 1676-1677; part of 1730-1731.�Note: �Transcribed and edited by Roswell Randall Hoes. Vol. I & II, published 1906. ISBN 1-55613-704-4. Roswell Randall Hoes was a chaplain in the US Navy. He was the son of Lucy Maria Randall and Reverend John Hoes. Italicized: Y

Notes

Note DWNLNOTE
Genealogy by Marla F. Kirby marlakirby@@hotmail.com

LDS Baptism

LDS Baptism:
Date: 18 Mar 1992
LDS Temple: ARIZO[41]
LDS Endowment:
Date: 7 May 1992
LDS Temple: ARIZO[42]
LDS Sealing Child:
Child of Family: @F4304@
Date: 22 Dec 2005
LDS Temple: BISMA[43]

Source Notes

  1. Source: #S403
  2. Source: #S413
  3.  : Source: #S62
  4. Source: #S403
  5.  : Source: #S62
  6.  : Source: #S176
  7.  : Source: #S176
    Data:
  8.  : Source: #S62
  9. Source: #S403
  10. Source: #S413
  11.  : Source: #S25
  12. Reynolds, Cuyler, Hudson and Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company,1911).
  13.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  14.  : Source: #S284
    Page: Pedigree Resource File, Disk 1
  15.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  16.  : Source: #S284
    Page: Pedigree Resource File, Disk 1
  17.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  18.  : Source: #S504
    Page: extracted by Arnold Zuiderent, Holland
  19.  : Source: #S424
    Page: http://www.oud-ophemert.nl/herwijnen/Roza_GN_Eng.html
  20.  : Source: #S321
    Page: Vol. VXXI, pp. 163-166, 235-237
  21.  : Source: #S349
    Page: Vol. I, p. 74
  22. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 227-228).
  23. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., page 231.)
  24. (Sylvester's Hist. Ulster county, page 36).
  25. (Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. XIII., pages 242-3).
  26. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. Xlll., pages 245-6, 256- 372).
  27. (Schoonmaker's Hist. of Kingston, page 39. OLDE ULSTER, Vol II, pages 1-9).
  28. (History of Kingston, page 57).
  29. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 436).
  30. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., pages 448, 450, 460).
  31. (Col. Hist. N. Y. Vol. XIII., page 475. Vol. II., page 626 Report State Historian New York, Colonial Series (1896) page 384).
  32. Source: #S2351072614 Page: Place: New Netherland; Year: 1620-1664; Page Number: . Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1627996&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Arrival date: 1620-1664Arrival place: New Netherland
  33. Source: #S2351072614 Page: Place: New Netherland; Year: 1620-1664; Page Number: . Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=pili354&h=1627996&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Arrival date: 1620-1664Arrival place: New Netherland
  34. Immigrant Ships: Bontekoe (Spotted Cow) Sailed on 15 April 1660
  35. Roosa-256 was created by David Townsend through the import of marlakirby-WMBlack-ancestors.ged on Mar 3, 2014.
  36. Source: #S20 Note: http://www.hopefarm.com/roosa.htm A Roosa Family Bible Record.
  37. LDS Sealing Spouse:
    Date: 10 Oct 1992
    LDS Temple: ARIZO
  38. Source: #S67 Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church to request LDS temple ordinances. CONT Search performed using PAF Insight on 4/2/2008 Data: Text: Aldert Heymanse ROOSA; Male; Death: 27 FEB 1679; Sealing to Spouse: 10 OCT 1992 ARIZO; Wyntje ALLARD; Spouse: Wyntje ALLARD; Marriage: About 1642 Of Gelderland, , , Netherlands
  39. Source: #S75
  40. Source: #S67 Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. CONT Search performed using PAF Insight on 4/2/2008 Data: Text: Aldert Heymansen ROOSA; Male; Birth: 1618 Herynen, , Gelderland, Netherlands; Christening: About 1630 Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands; Death: 27 FEB 1679 Esophus, Hurley, Ulster, New York; Burial: 1679 Hurley, Ulster, New York; Spouse: Wyntie Ariens DE JONGE; Marriage: 1642 Gerlderland, , , Netherlands
  41. Source: #S67 Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church to request LDS temple ordinances. CONT Search performed using PAF Insight on 4/2/2008 Data: Text: Aldert Heyman Roosa; Male; Birth: 1616 Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands; Death: 27 FEB 1679 Hurley, Ulster, New York; Baptism: 17 SEP 2005 BISMA; Endowment: 16 DEC 2005 BISMA; Sealing to Parents: 22 DEC 2005 BISMA; Heyman Gysbert Roosa / Eijke Jan Kuijsten; Father: Heyman Gysbert Roosa; Mother: Eijke Jan Kuijsten
  42. Source: #S67 Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church to request LDS temple ordinances. CONT Search performed using PAF Insight on 4/2/2008 Data: Text: Aldert Heyman Roosa; Male; Birth: 1616 Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands; Death: 27 FEB 1679 Hurley, Ulster, New York; Baptism: 17 SEP 2005 BISMA; Endowment: 16 DEC 2005 BISMA; Sealing to Parents: 22 DEC 2005 BISMA; Heyman Gysbert Roosa / Eijke Jan Kuijsten; Father: Heyman Gysbert Roosa; Mother: Eijke Jan Kuijsten
  43. Source: #S67 Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church to request LDS temple ordinances. CONT Search performed using PAF Insight on 4/2/2008 Data: Text: Aldert Heyman Roosa; Male; Birth: 1616 Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands; Death: 27 FEB 1679 Hurley, Ulster, New York; Baptism: 17 SEP 2005 BISMA; Endowment: 16 DEC 2005 BISMA; Sealing to Parents: 22 DEC 2005 BISMA; Heyman Gysbert Roosa / Eijke Jan Kuijsten; Father: Heyman Gysbert Roosa; Mother: Eijke Jan Kuijsten

Acknowledgments

  • Roosa-256 was created by David Townsend through the import of marlakirby-WMBlack-ancestors.ged on Mar 3, 2014.
User ID: 7E6590B9C671574DB5E9CFA550A2188CAF4A
Prior to import, this record was last changed 16:55:50 18 Oct 2011.







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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Aeldert Hymanse by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree:

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Collaboration

On October 16, 2014 at 19:57GMT Liz Shifflett wrote:

Roosa-256 and Roosa-86 appear to represent the same person because: they were in an unmerged match & the New Netherland Settlers Approval System (http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Space:New_Netherland_Settlers_-_Approval_System) now has them marked "Green" (NNS Category) and "Orange" (Merge Pending), indicating that the two are ready to be merged. Thanks!