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Jacob Schlotterer

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Born in Bodelshausen, Baden-Württemberg, Germanymap
[sibling(s) unknown]
[spouse(s) unknown]
Died about in Granville County, North Carolina, USAmap
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Biography

Jacob Schlotterer was born on July 25, 1732 in Bodelshausen, Wurttemberg (a German state) to Jacob Schlotterer and Anna Barbara Albrecht. Bodelshausen is a very small village just a few miles south of Stuttgart, Germany. He had six brothers and sisters, Hanns Bernhardt (born September 1717), Anna Barbara (born December 1718), Waldburga (born November 10, 1720), Anna Maria (born October 24, 1722), Agnes (born June 1725) and Martin (born April 15, 1727). The older Jacob Schlotterer was born October 12, 1693 and was a tailor. Anna Barbara Albrecht was born October 2, 1690. They were married January 28, 1716.

In 1723, Charles Alexander became Duke of Wurttemberg. He had become Catholic and tried to force people to go to the Catholic churches. A Jewish financier loaned him the money to hire soldiers to carry out his wishes. Charles Alexander died in 1737, and in 1738 the financier was tried and hanged. The duke's son, Charles Eugene became old enough to rule in 1744. He was no better than his father. Many Germans, especially Lutherans, decided to go to America for religious freedom.

In 1749, Jacob Schlotterer and his brother, Martin, left their village to come to America. Some other Schlotterers also left at the same time. They were Jacob (born April 28, 1726, son of Jacob and Ursula), Mattheis (born December 25, 1722, son of Michael and Agnes), and Johann Conradt (born August 23, 1726, son of Matthies and Anna Barbara). They went down the Rhine River to Rotterdam (in what is now the Netherlands) and boarded the ship Chesterfield. The captain was Thomas Coatam. The ship sailed to Cowes, England for supplies and then left for America. The Schlotterers arrived in Philadelphia. On Saturday, September 2, 1749, they went to the courthouse and took an oath of allegiance to George II, King of England. They also signed a passenger list. The Pennsylvania Gazette (a newspaper published by Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia) on September 7, 1749, recorded the arrival of the Chesterfield. Jacob settled in Germantown, which is now within the city limits of Philadelphia. He then got married and started raising a family. The area was getting crowded, so he and his family moved south, as many other German immigrants were doing.

On November 9, 1757, Jacob Schlotterer bought 640 acres of land on both sides of Shelton Creek in St. John's Parish, Granville County from John Carteret, Earl of Granville. Jacob lived on the southern half of this one square mile tract until he died in 1824. The Daughters of the American Revolution have erected a marker on Rural Paved Road 1309 near Berea not far from his farm in memory of his service during the Revolutionary War.

Jacob Schlotterer probably married in Pennsylvania, although no record has been found so far. Many marriages from that period of time were not recorded. There is a marriage record in Christ Church in Philadelphia for Jacob Slaughter and Mary Hoffman on March 17, 1761, that may be his second marriage, since there is no proof so far that he actually moved to North Carolina before taking the State Oath on May 22, 1778. [1]

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Sources

  • Robert Ward, firsthand knowledge. Click the Changes tab for the details of edits by Robert and others.
  1. Entered by Robert Ward, Feb 9, 2012, data taken from Michael Slaughter database for the Slaughter family.









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