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Jonas Weed

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Jonas Weed
Born in Stanwix, Northamptonshire, Engmap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married in Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut, USAmap
Died in Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticutmap
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Categories: Puritan Great Migration.


The Puritan Great Migration. This person was part of the Puritan Great Migration.
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Contents

Biography

Name

Name: Jonas Weed

Birth

Birth: About 1607 at Stanwix, Northamptonshire, England though "Great Migration Begins..." says his origins are unknown.

Death

Death: November 7, 1676 at Stamford, Fairfield Co, Connecticut

Narrative

This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. Firstly, the surname may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a topographical name for a dweller in, or near, a weedy place. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "weod", weed. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. In some instances the surname may be of Old Germanic origin, as a patronymic from the given name "Wido", a pet form of names beginning with the German "wid", forest (as "Widwalt" and "Widulf"). The surname can also be found as Wead, Weede and Wede. Recordings of the surname from London Church Registers include: the christening of Martha Weede on October 25th 1582 at St. Mary Whitechapel, Stepney; the marriage of George Weed and Philadelphia Hinch on September 2nd 1624 at St. Gregory by St. Paul; the marriage of Joan Weed and Henry Warde on November 23rd 1641 at Tottenham; and the marriage of Augustyne Weed and Mary James on July 7th 1659 at St. Peter's, Paul's Wharf. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Elizabeth Wede, which was dated September 16th 1579, christened at Padiham, Lancashire, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Emigration: 29 Mar 1630 Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom Immigration: 12 Jun 1630 Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, USA Note: Jonas came on the ship Arbella, in the fleet with Sir Richard Saltonstall and Governor Winthrop in 1630. In all, seventeen ships arrived in New England from England that year. There were four ships in the Winthrop fleet, the others being the Jewel, the Ambrose, and the Talbot. He and other members of this Puritan group, originally set sail on March 29 of that year and after some difficulties, finally set sail from Yarmouth at the Isle of Wight. The Arbella reached Massechusetts on 12 Jun 1630, the Jewell arrived the following day; the Ambrose arrived on 18 June and the Talbot arrived on 2 July. The Arbella left most of its passengers at Salem, but Jonas Weed moved on to Watertown, Massechusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. He did not settle long in Watertown; in 1635 he was a first settler in Wetherfield, Connecticut and was later one of the founders of Stamford, Connecticut in 1641. Residence: 18 May 1631-29 Mar 1636 Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Religion: Note: In May of 1635 he was one of six dismissed from the Watertown Church to form a new church on the Connecticut River at Wethersfield. Colonial records note that at a Court held at Newton on 26 April 1636: 'Whereas there was a dismission granted by the Church of Watertown in Massechusetts dated 29th of March to Andrew Ward, Joe Sherman, Joe Strickland, Rob'te Coo, Rob'te Reynolds and Jonas Weed, with intent to forme a newe Church: Covennte in this River of Connecticut, the sade parties hase soe accordingly done with the publicke allowance of the rest of the members of the saide Churches, as by certificate nowe prduced apprs. It is therefore, in this prsent Cort, ratified and confimined, they prmising shortlie and publiquely to renewe the saide Covenant vppon notice to the rest of the Churches'. Residence: 29 Mar 1636-1640 Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Note: Jonas Weed's home in Wethersfield was at the extreme northern end of the Eastern side of the present High Street. It's position is indicated by his name on the 1640 map of the town in 'The History of Ancient Wethersfield'. Residence: 1640-1642 Branford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Residence: 1642-1676 Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA Will: 26 Nov 1672 Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA Probate: 05 Jun 1676 Stamford, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA _UID: EBF97AA17BDE445589C9F905EB03312F8F0F Change Date: 29 Sep 2007 at 19:19 Note: When a young man of 25 years, Jonas Weed emigrated with John Winthrop, as a passenger on one of the ships that made up the Winthrop Fleet consisting of eleven ships. The flagship of the fleet was the 'Arbella' and she carried John Winthrop (the elected leader of the expedition), three of his sons and servant; 25 of the most important people and 70 'planters' or people with a good trade background. Jonas Weed was a passenger on the flagship. Of the 700 who crossed the Atlantic together in the spring of 1630, two hundred died the first winter. When spring came, another two hundred, disappointed by the poor living conditions, gave up and went back to England. Many of the British investors decided this was a losing enterprise and pulled out, leaving the colonists without support or supplies. Not Jonas! He had come here to start a new life. He expected a rugged and dangerous New World; he found it and would do his best to conquer it. He rolled up his sleeves and went to work building shelters, hunting for food, digging caves in the hillsides to help the colony survive the cold winter. In 1641, Jonas is credited with being a founder of Stamford, Fairfield Co, Connecticut. Unlike John Winthrop, Jonas did not keep a diary, so learning about him is difficult. We do know that he was the father of at least ten children.

Sources








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DNA
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