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Cynric, King (Wessex) of the West Saxons

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Cynric (Cynric, King) of the West Saxons formerly Wessex
Born about in Wessex, Englandmap
Son of and [mother unknown]
Brother of
[spouse(s) unknown]
Died in Wessex, Englandmap
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Categories: House of Wessex.

The House of Wessex crest. This person is a member of the House of Wessex.
badges This person was a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in Europe. If you are interested in this profile, see our European Royals and Aristocrats Prior to 742 Project.
Preceded by
Cerdic
King of the West Saxons
534 - 560
Succeeded by
Ceawlin

Contents

EuroAristo Project Note

Roger is currently (20130726) identifying Cynric's father (or perhaps grandfather, or perhaps neither) Cerdic as the upper limit of Wessex management. Filiations which are probably legendary will be treated as real, with notes to that effect in the biographies of Cerdic's "descendants."

No mother or spouses are reliably attested for Cynric. Any linking of a mother or a spouse without the express agreement of the EuroAristo project in the G2G forum will be disconnected.

Bio

FMG's Medieval Lands entry for Cerdic and his sons



Biography

About Cynric, King of Wessex http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex

Cynric of Wessex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle.[1] If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh).[2] In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE.[3] This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.

[edit] Notes

1. ^ Myres, p. 162 2. ^ Clemoes, p. 30 3. ^ Laing, p.114

[edit] References

* Peter Clemoes, Simon Keynes, Michael Lapidge, (1981) Anglo-Saxon England, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521038340 * Laing, L.R., (1975) The archaeology of late Celtic Britain and Ireland, c. 400-1200 AD, Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0416823602 * John Nowell Linton Myres, (1989) The English Settlements, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0192822357

[edit] See also

* House of Wessex family tree

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex

Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.


Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This, apparently Gaelic wording, contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminscent of "Ceawlin."


Cynric de Wessex fut roi du Wessex de 534 à 560[1]. Il était le fils ou le petit-fils de son prédecesseur, Cerdic. Tout comme ce dernier, Cynric était probablement d'origine bretonne. Son nom est en effet une version anglicisée du britonnique Cunorix. Peu de choses nous sont connues de sa vie. Nous savons toutefois qu'il a pris Searobyrig, dans la région de Salisbury, en 552. Également, en 556 Cynric et son fils supposé Ceawlin livrèrent une bataille contre les Brittons à Beranburh (à présent Barbury Castle).

A noter que la filiation entre Cynric et Ceawlin n'apparait pas dans tout les manuscrits de la Chronique Anglo-Saxonne. Sa présence pourrait en fait être une interpolation tardive destinée à lier Ceawlin à la lignée de Cerdic. Toujours selon la Chronique Anglo-Saxonne il aurait été présent aux côtés de Cerdic dés 495 mais cela paraît peu vraisemblable


Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This, apparently Primitive Irish wording, contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex


Cynric of Wessex

Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh).


Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This, apparently Gaelic wording, contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Baden Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex


Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This, apparently Gaelic wording, contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Baden Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex


Cynric, King of Wessex (1)

M, #102634, d. circa 560

Last Edited=3 Dec 2005

Cynric, King of Wessex was the son of Cerdic, King of Wessex. (1)

He died circa 560. (1)

Cynric, King of Wessex succeeded to the title of King Cynric of Wessex in 534. (1)

Children of Cynric, King of Wessex

-1. Ceawlin, King of Wessex+ d. 593 (1)

-2. Cutha, King of Wessex+ d. 584

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10264.htm#i102634


KING CYNRIC2 OF WESSEX (Cerdic1), son of (1) King Cerdic1, was born before 534, and died in 560[77]. [ King of the West Saxons 534-560

"A.D. 552. This year Cynric fought with the Britons on the spot that is called

Sarum, and put them to flight. ...

556. This year Cynric and Ceawlin fought ... at Beranbury."

Children

1 M Ceawlin

Death 0593

2 M Cutha

3 M Cuthwulf

Military Notes for Cynric

defeated Romano-Britons at Salisbury in 552

Research

Cynric faced competition from Stuf and Wihtgar, who came to Wessex in 514 and were said to be "nefa" of Cerdic and Cynric. The term "nefa" means both nephew and grandson, and it has been suggested that Stuf and Wihtgar were father and son; possibly a son and grandson of Cerdic's sister and a Jutish nobleman. In 534, Cynric gave the Isle of Wight to Stuf and Wihtgar.

Child:

i. KING CEALWINE3 of Ashford, Kent, England, United Kingdom, b. before 560, d. in 593.


Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This, apparently Gaelic wording, contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Baden Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.


Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle.[1] If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh).[2] In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE.[3] This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.


1.ID: I179793 2.Name: King Cynric [@ <^>v] de Wessex 3.Sex: M 4.Birth: 528 5.Death: 560 Father: King Creoda [@ <^>v] de Wessex b: 510

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

Children

1. Has Children King Ceawlin [@ <^>v] de Wessex b: 548

B: UNKNOWN

D: 0560

S:

Acced 534.

S:

4 Reigned 534-560.


Cynric was King of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign it is said that he captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle.[2] If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh).[3] In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE.[4] This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex


Cynric of Wessex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Cynric)

Cynric of Wessex (Cynric means roughly 'Relative of the king' ) ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Camp. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus).

He was the King of Wessex.

Whether or not Creola was of Cynric is not certain. From theAnglo-Saxon Chronicle, Winchester Manuscript, Cynric is listed as theson of Cerdic. However the Abingdon and Worcester Manuscripts haveCreola as the son of Cerdic and father of Cynric. Creola is includedhere to allow for the possibility that he was the son of Cerdic.

From Enclopedia Britannica Online, article titled Cynric:

'king of the West Saxons, or Wessex (from 534-560). By some accountshe also reigned jointly (519-534) with his grandfather (or father?),Cerdic, founder of Wessex. The period was apparently one ofconsolidating gains climaxed by the Battle of Mount Badon (520) ratherthan a period of further expansion, though Cynric is said to haverouted Britons in battle at least once, at a place called Searobyrg(552). He was succeeded by his son Ceawlin.'


43rd great grandfather thru Alfred the Great (31ggf)

→ Æthelwulf King of Wessex (32ggf)

his father → Egbert King of Wessex (33ggf)

his father → Ealhmund King of Kent (34ggf)

his father → Eafa (35ggf)

his father → Eoppa Atheling of Wessex (36ggf)

his father → Inglid Prince of Wessex (37ggf)

his father → Cenred of Wessex (38ggf)

his father → Ceolwald of Wessex (39ggf)

his father → Cutha Cathwulf of Wessex (40ggf)

his father → Prince Cuthwine of Wessex (41ggf)

his father → Ceawlin King of Wessex (42ggf)

his father → Cynric King of Wessex (43ggf)

Cynric of Wessex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cynric was King of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle.[2] If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh).[3] In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE.[4] This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.

[edit]Notes

^ According to the Online DNB article on Ceol, he was the son of Cutha (probably Cuthwulf) and grandson of Cynric

^ Myres, p. 162

^ Clemoes, p. 30

^ Laing, p.114

[edit]References

Peter Clemoes, Simon Keynes, Michael Lapidge, (1981) Anglo-Saxon England, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521038340

Laing, L.R., (1975) The archaeology of late Celtic Britain and Ireland, c. 400-1200 AD, Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0416823602

John Nowell Linton Myres, (1989) The English Settlements, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0192822357

263884938297344. Cynric King Of WESSEX-[80606],3,8,9,16,31 son of Crioda, Prince Of WESSEX -[80621] and Mrs-Crioda, Princess Of WESSEX -[80622], was born about 525 in Of, , Wessex, England and died in 560 at age 35. Ancestral File Number: G70F-LT.

General Notes: 1 _UID 102DEC69F6DC5143AFF8FC9C27295BD2B434

Cynric married Mrs-Cynric Queen Of WESSEX -[80607] [MRIN:44953] in Of, , Wessex, England 3,8,9.,31

Marriage Notes: 1 _UID 46F85FAB8A7F99478406A87A0F2895650E0E

Children from this marriage were:

131942469148672 i. Ceawlin, King Of WESSEX -[80605] (born about 547 in Of, , Wessex, England - died about 591)

ii. Cwichelm, Prince Of WESSEX -[80618] was born about 553 in Of, , Wessex, England and died about 593 at age 40. Ancestral File Number: G70F-RP. iii. Cuthwulf, Prince Of WESSEX -[80616] was born about 549 in Of, , Wessex, England and died about 571 at age 22. Ancestral File Number: G70F-PC. iv. Cutha, Prince Of WESSEX -[80617] was born about 551 in Of, , Wessex, England and died about 584 at age 33. Ancestral File Number: G70F-QJ.

Cynric, King of Wessex1

M, #102634, d. circa 560

Last Edited=3 Dec 2005

Cynric, King of Wessex was the son of Cerdic, King of Wessex.1 He died circa 560.1 Cynric, King of Wessex succeeded to the title of King Cynric of Wessex in 534.1

Children of Cynric, King of Wessex

Ceawlin, King of Wessex+1 d. 593

Cutha, King of Wessex+ d. 584

Citations

[S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 66. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

Cynric

King of Wessex

Reign 534-560

Predecessor Cerdic

Successor Ceawlin

Issue

Ceawlin

Cutha or Cuthwulf[1]

Father Cerdic

Died 560


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex

Cynric of Wessex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Cynric

King of Wessex

Reign 534-560

Predecessor Cerdic

Successor Ceawlin

Issue

Ceawlin

Cutha or Cuthwulf[1]

Father Cerdic

Died 560

Cynric was King of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign it is said that he captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle.[2] If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh).[3] In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE.[4] This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.

[edit] Notes

1. ^ According to the Online DNB article on Ceol, he was the son of Cutha (probably Cuthwulf) and grandson of Cynric 2. ^ Myres, p. 162 3. ^ Clemoes, p. 30 4. ^ Laing, p.114

[edit] References

* Peter Clemoes, Simon Keynes, Michael Lapidge, (1981) Anglo-Saxon England, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521038340 * Laing, L.R., (1975) The archaeology of late Celtic Britain and Ireland, c. 400-1200 AD, Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0416823602 * John Nowell Linton Myres, (1989) The English Settlements, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0192822357

[edit] See also

* House of Wessex family tree

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Cerdic King of Wessex

534-560 Succeeded by

Ceawlin of Wessex

[hide]

v • d • e

Monarchs of Wessex

Cerdic · Cynric · Ceawlin · Ceol · Ceolwulf · Cynegils · Cwichelm · Cenwalh · Penda of Mercia · Cenwalh restored · Seaxburh · Æscwine · Centwine · Cædwalla · Ine · Æthelheard · Cuthred · Sigeberht · Cynewulf · Beorhtric · Egbert · Æthelwulf · Æthelbald · Æthelberht · Æthelred · Alfred · Edward · Ælfweard · The Kingdom of England

This page was last modified on 11 May 2010 at 19:25.


BIOGRAPHY: d. 560

king of the West Saxons, or Wessex (from 534). By some accounts he also reigned jointly (519-534) with his grandfather (or father?), Cerdic, founder of Wessex. The period was apparently one of consolidating gains climaxed by the Battle of Mount Badon (520) rather than a period of further expansion, though Cynric is said to have routed Britons in battle at least once, at a place called Searobyrg (552). He was succeeded by his son Ceawlin.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Ceawlin (also spelled "Ceaulin" or "Caelin") (died c. 593) was a king of Wesse, in what is now southwestern England . He may have been the son of Cynric of Wessex , and the grandson of Cerdic of Wessex , who is recorded in early sources as the leader of the first group of West Saxons to come to England. Ceawlin was active at a time when the Anglo-Saxon invasion of England was being completed; by the time he died, little of southern England remained in the hands of the native Britons.

An early source, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , records several battles of his, from 556 to 592, including the first record of a battle between different groups of Anglo-Saxons. The chronology of his life is highly uncertain: his reign is variously listed as lasting seven, seventeen, or thirty-two years, and the historical accuracy and dating of many of the events in the Chronicle have been called into question. However, it appears that under Ceawlin Wessex acquired significant territory, though some was later lost to other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Ceawlin is also named as one of the eight "bretwaldas": this was a name given in the Chronicle to eight rulers who had overlordship over southern Britain, though the actual extent of Ceawlin’s control is not known.

Ceawlin died in 593, having been deposed the year before, possibly by his successor, Ceol. He is recorded in various sources as having two sons, Cutha and Cuthwine, but the genealogies in which this information is found are known to be unreliable.


BIOGRAPHY: d. 560

King of the West Saxons, or Wessex (from 534). By some accounts, he also reigned jointly (519-534) with his grandfather (or father?), Cerdic, founder of Wessex. The period was apparently one of consolidating gains climaxed by the Battle of Mount Badon (520) rather than a period of further expansion, though Cynric is said to have routed Britons in battle at least once, at a place called Searobyrg (552). He was succeeded by his son Ceawlin.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Ceawlin (also spelled "Ceaulin" or "Caelin") (died c. 593) was a king of Wessex in what is now southwestern England He may have been the son of Cynric of Wessex and the grandson of Cerdic of Wessex who is recorded in early sources as the leader of the first group of West Saxons to come to England. Ceawlin was active at a time when the Anglo-Saxon invasion of England was being completed; by the time he died, little of southern England remained in the hands of the native Britons.

An early source, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, records several battles of his, from 556 to 592, including the first record of a battle between different groups of Anglo-Saxons. The chronology of his life is highly uncertain: his reign is variously listed as lasting seven, seventeen, or thirty-two years, and the historical accuracy and dating of many of the events in the Chronicle have been called into question. However, it appears that under Ceawlin Wessex acquired significant territory, though some was later lost to other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Ceawlin is also named as one of the eight "bretwaldas." This was a name given in the Chronicle to eight rulers who had overlordship over southern Britain, though the actual extent of Ceawlin’s control is not known.

Ceawlin died in 593, having been deposed the year before, possibly by his successor, Ceol. He is recorded in various sources as having two sons, Cutha and Cuthwine,

but the genealogies in which this information is found are known to be unreliable.


Landing of the Saxons

The founders of the Kingdom of Wessex were supposedly Cerdic and Cynric, who established a Saxon kingdom in the region south of the Thames in around 530 A.D. A generation later, Ceawlin, the Third King of Wessex, greatly expanded the area of Wessex, driving both the Welsh and Britons out of the region, and establishing Wessex as one of the primary kingdoms in England. The Saxon and Angle kingdoms of England remained independent until about 800 A.D., at which time Egbert, a king of Wessex, sought to unify the kingdoms under a single head. It was at this time that Britain became known as England (Angle-Land).

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://heritage-literature.org/books/tappan/european/zpage058b.gif&imgrefurl=http://heritage-literature.org/www/heritage.php%3FDir%3Dwars%26FileName%3Dwars_saxonbritain.php&usg=__RXCf1xO89RUpLwLWxbXBH7guTvY=&h=479&w=587&sz=251&hl=en&start=79&tbnid=y77-54mGfabAeM:&tbnh=110&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3DKing%2Bof%2BWessex%2BCynric%26gbv%3D2%26ndsp%3D18%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26start%3D72


From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_055.htm

Note: Cynric's parents are not proven!

King of the West Saxons, or Wessex (from 534). By some accounts he also reigned jointly (519-534) with his grandfather (or father?), Cerdic, founder of Wessex. The period was apparently one of consolidating gains climaxed by the Battle of Mount Badon (520) rather than a period of further expansion, though Cynric is said to have routed Britons in battle at least once, at a place called Searobyrg (552). He was succeeded by his son Ceawlin.

Cynric is probably son of Cerdic's son Creoda instead of being Cerdic's son. "Cynric defeated the Britons at (Old) Salisbury in 552 and again in conjunction with his son Ceawlin at Beranburh, probably Barbury hill near Swindon, in 556."{- Encycl.Brit.,56,23:520} {Cf."The Age of Arthur," John Morris, 1973, pp.225-6.} He also had a son, Cutha (killed in 584), whose son Ceolric deposed Cealwin in 591 and reigned until 597 (succeeded by a second son of Cutha, Ceolwulf, who reigned 597-611). Cynric's sister had two known sons: Stuf and Wihtgar (King of the Isle of Wight, d. 544; ancestor of Osburh, mother of Alfred the Great).

Note: Cynric's parents are not proven!


regerade åren 534-560. Blev ca 35 år.


BIOGRAPHY: d. 560

King of the West Saxons, or Wessex (from 534). By some accounts he also reigned jointly (519-534) with his grandfather (or father?), Cerdic, founder of Wessex. The period was apparently one of consolidating gains climaxed by the Battle of Mount Badon (520) rather than a period of further expansion, though Cynric is said to have routed Britons in battle at least once, at a place called Searobyrg (552). He was succeeded by his son Ceawlin.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Ceawlin (also spelled "Ceaulin" or "Caelin") (died c. 593) was a king of Wesse, in what is now southwestern England . He may have been the son of Cynric of Wessex , and the grandson of Cerdic of Wessex , who is recorded in early sources as the leader of the first group of West Saxons to come to England. Ceawlin was active at a time when the Anglo-Saxon invasion of England was being completed; by the time he died, little of southern England remained in the hands of the native Britons.

An early source, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , records several battles of his, from 556 to 592, including the first record of a battle between different groups of Anglo-Saxons. The chronology of his life is highly uncertain: his reign is variously listed as lasting seven, seventeen, or thirty-two years, and the historical accuracy and dating of many of the events in the Chronicle have been called into question. However, it appears that under Ceawlin Wessex acquired significant territory, though some was later lost to other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Ceawlin is also named as one of the eight "bretwaldas": this was a name given in the Chronicle to eight rulers who had overlordship over southern Britain, though the actual extent of Ceawlin’s control is not known.

Ceawlin died in 593, having been deposed the year before, possibly by his successor, Ceol. He is recorded in various sources as having two sons, Cutha and Cuthwine, but the genealogies in which this information is found are known to be unreliable.

Wikipedia:

Cynric of Wessex ruled as king of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.


Cynric was King of Wessex from 534 to 560. Everything known about him comes from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. There he is stated to have been the son of Cerdic, and also (in the regnal list in the preface) to have been the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda. During his reign he is said to have captured Searobyrig or Old Sarum, near Salisbury, in 552, and that in 556 he and his son Ceawlin won a battle against the Britons at Beranburh, now identified as Barbury Castle. If these dates are accurate, then it is unlikely that the earlier entries in the chronicle, starting with his arrival in Britain with his father Cerdic in 495, are correct. David Dumville has suggested that his true regnal dates are 554-581.

The name Cynric has a straightforward Old English etymology meaning "kin-ruler." However, as both his predecessor, Cerdic, and successor, Ceawlin, have Celtic names an alternative etymology has been postulated from "cunorix" which would mean "hound-king" in Old British (rendered as "cynwrig" in Old Welsh). In 1967 a stone was found at Wroxeter in a Sub-Roman context with the inscription CUNORIX MACUS MA QVI COLINE. This wording contains both the name Cunorix and another which is reminiscent of "Ceawlin."

In the 2004 film King Arthur, Cerdic and Cynric were depicted as Saxon invaders, and were killed, respectively, by King Arthur and Lancelot at the Battle of Badon Hill (Mons Badonicus). Cynric was portrayed by Til Schweiger.


Anglo Saxon Chronicles 495: "Here two chieftains; Cerdic and Cynric his son, came to Britain with 5 ships at a place which is called Cerdic's shore and the same day fought against the Welsh." [The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 14].

Anglo Saxon Chronicles 508: "Here Cerdic and Cynric killed a certain British king, whose name was Natanleod, and 5 thousand men with him - after whom the land as far as Charford was name Netley." [The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 14].

Anglo Saxon Chronicles 519: "Here Cerdic and Cynric succeeded to the Kingdom of the West Saxons; and the same year they fought against the Britons at the place they now name Cerdic's ford. And the royal family of the West Saxons ruled from that day on." [The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 16].


Cynric, King of the West Saxons was born circa 525. He was the son of Creoda, King of the West Saxons [The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 66, 286].

Anglo Saxon Chronicles 527: "Here Cerdic and Cynric fought against the Britons at the place which is called Cerdic's Wood."[The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 16].

Anglo Saxon Chronicles 530: "Here Cerdic and Cynric took the Isle of Wight and killed a few men at Wihtgar's stronghold."5

King of West Saxons, England, between 534 and 560. Anglo Saxon Chronicles 552: "Here Cynric fought against the Britons at the place which is named Salisbury, and put the Britons to flight."[The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 16].


Anglo Saxon Chronicles 556: "Here Cynric and Ceawlin fought against the Britons at Bera's stronghold."[The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 16].

He died in 560 [[The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, pg. 66 and Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700, 1-3].


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynric_of_Wessex


Cynric regerade åren 534-560.

Källa: Brian Tompsett, University of Hull.

Två ledare som hette Cerdic och hans son Cynric, kom år 495 till Britannien med 5 skepp till en plats kallad Cerdic's-ore. De stred mot Walesare samma dag.

År 508 dräpte Cerdic och Cynric en brittisk kung som hette Natanleod och 5000 man.

År 519 tog Cerdic och Cynric över styret av West-Saxons. Samma år stred de mot britterna vid platsen Charford.

År 527 stred Cerdic och Cynric mot britterna vid platsen Cerdic's-ley.

År 530 intog Cerdic och Cynric Isle of Wight och dräpte många män i Carisbrook.

År 534 avled Cerdic, den förste kungen av West-Saxons. Sonen Cynric övertog styret och regerade i 26 vintrar.

År 552 stred Cynric mot britterna vid en plats kallad Sarum, och lyckades få dem att fly.

År 556 stred Cynric och Ceawlin mot britterna vid Beranbury.

Källa: Den anglosaxiska krönikan.

Event:
Type: Record Change
Date: 26 AUG 2002


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