no image

Theophilus Whalley

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Theophilus Robert Whalley
Born about in Kirketon, Nottinghamshire, England
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Died in South Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island Colony [uncertain]
Last profile change on 1 March 2015
20:43: PM Eyestone edited the Biography for Theophilus Whalley. (added to category Questionable Gateway Ancestors - shows lines to Quincy-226, etc) [Thank PM for this]
This page has been accessed 417 times.

Categories: Questionable Gateway Ancestors.


BIography

Savage states, in volume 4 of First Settlers of New England, that Whalley, Theophilus, Kingstown, R. I. came from Virg. with w. Eliz. a. 1676, had Joan, Ann, Theodosia, Eliz. Martha, Lydia, and Samuel; but it thot. that if not more, the eldest two were b. in Virg. Great uncertainty attaches to almost every thing he said or did, as is found oft. in regard to those wh. emig. from a dist. country, and liv. to gr. age. Potter says he knew Hebrew, Greek, &c. and d. a. 1719 or 20, aged a. 104. It would have been strange, if more than one myth had not sprung out of his grave. My first exercise of caution would be to examine the means of reducing his yrs. by 20 or near, for his only s. it is said, d. a. 1728, and it is quite improb. that when he was b. the f. was much beyond 70. Beside that his w. d. 8 or 10 yrs. bef. her h. Dr. Stiles in the exuberance of conject. that the requisite to sustain his credulity, supposes he may have been one of the regicides. But we kn. the names of all wh. acted in that tragedy, as well as of those wh. were nominat. and declin. to act. or withdrew, as did sev. aft. participat. some hours in the mockery of trial, bef. its end, among all of wh. is not that of Theophilus Whale. One of those misguid. men would have resort. to any other part of the world. sooner than to Virg. 

Theophilus Whalley/Whaley came to Rhode Island from Rappahannock County, Virginia, where he sold his plantation in 1665. He was university-educated and born of wealthy parents, waited upon hand and foot by servants until the age of 18, by his own reported testimony. He was in Virginia before he was 21, and served there as a military officer. He returned to England to serve in the Parliamentary army under Oliver Cromwell, who may have been a close relative. If his real identity has been deduced correctly (see below), his regiment took part in the execution of Charles I in 1649, and its commander, an officer named Hacker, was later executed. Some sources suggest that Theophilus was actually Robert Whalley - brother of Edward Whalley, one of the two regicide judges who fled England and were concealed for some time in - among other places - Hadley, Massachusetts. If this is true, "Theophilus" was an assumed name, designed to cover his past after the ascension of Charles II to the throne in 1660.

About that time, "Theophilus" returned to VA and bought land there, where he married Elizabeth Mills (1645-1715) and where two or three of their children were born. Sometime between 1665 and 1680 he came to Rhode Island, settling at the head of Pettaquamscutt Pond in Narragansett. He never spoke of his past while living in Rhode Island and made his living there by fishing, weaving, and teaching (he knew Greek, Latin and Hebrew). He seems to have avoided public notice and public office, though he sometimes penned deeds and other legal documents for less literate neighbors. Mysterious visits to his home by distinguished men from Boston and elsewhere enriched the humble life he had chosen to lead. During Queen Anne's War, a warship dropped anchor in Narragansett Bay and its captain, a kinsman of Theophilus Whaley bearing the same surname, sent a boat to Whaley's landing to invite him aboard for dinner. Whaley at first accepted, but changed his mind and did not go, explaining to a friend afterward that he feared a trap had been laid to take him back to England. This story seemed to confirm the suspicions of his contemporaries that he was himself one of the regicide judges - a suspicion that inexplicably persisted long after the movements of fugitive judges Goffe and Edward Whalley had become well known.

He was on the tax rolls of Kingstown in 1687 and on 6 September of that year he was taxed 35s 11d. He acquired 120 acres at East Greenwich on 30 Jan 1710, conveyed to him from the proprietors of the tract of land now comprising West Greenwich. On 20 Feb 1711 he and his wife Elizabeth deeded to their only son Samuel for love, etc., that same 120 acres. He moved, in the latter part of his life, to the house of his son-in-law Joseph Hawkins.He was buried with military honors near the home of that son-in-law in West Greenwich.

Theophilus Whaley's children were Joan, Ann, Theodosia, Elizabeth, Martha (b. 1680), Lydia, and Samuel. Only Martha's birth date is known for certain, but all the children were born after his return to Virginia about 1660.

From the Genealogical Dictionary of First Settlers of New England, V. IV: “Theophilus Whale, Kingston, R. I., came from Virginia with wife Elizabeth about 1676, had Joan, Ann, Theodosia, Elizabeth, Martha, Lydia, and Samuel; but it is thought that if not more, the eldest two were born in Virginia. Great uncertainty attaches to almost everything he said or did, as is found often in regard to those who emigrated from a distant country and lived to great age. Potter says he knew Hebrew, Greek, etc. and died about 1719/20, aged about 104. It would have been strange if more than one myth had not sprung out of his grave. My first exercise of caution would be to examine the means of reducing his years by 20 or near, for his only son, it is said, died about 1782, and it is quite improbable that when he was born the father was much beyond 70. Beside that his wife died 8 or 10 yrs. before her husband. Dr. Stiles in the exuberance of his conjecture that was requisite to sustain his credulity supposes he may have been one of the regicides. But we know the names of all who acted in that tragedy, as well as of those who were nominated and declined to act or withdrew as did several after participating some hours in the mockery of trial before its end, among all of whom is not that of Theophilus Whale. Some of those misguided men would have resorted to any other part of the world, sooner than Virginia. Samuel Whale, only son of Theophilus, had two wives, first a Hopkins, then a Harrington, as Potter reports; and that his children were seven: Thomas, Samuel, Theophilus, James or Jeremy, John and two daughters, and that he died about 1782."

This person was created through the import of Bwiki.ged on 03 April 2011. This person was created through the import of mostrecentforgramps.ged on 13 September 2010. This person was created through the import of grant2.ged on 07 February 2011. This person was created through the import of Sheppard_Duncan_Bickham_Stroud.ged on 01 February 2011. WikiTree profile Whaley-300 created through the import of Steve Sanders family tree_2011-08-28.ged on Aug 30, 2011 by Steve Sanders. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Steve and others. WikiTree profile Whaley-297 created through the import of Clancy Family 9.ged on Aug 22, 2011 by Shirley Becker. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Shirley and others. This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import.[1]

Marriage

Husband: Richard Whalley
Wife: @I14348@
Child: @I14481@
Child: @I14368@
Child: Edward Whalley
Child: Theophilus Robert Whalley
Child: @I14370@
Child: @I14371@
Child: @I14372@
Marriage:
Date: 1595
SDATE 1 JUL 1595
Place: London, England
Note: They were married by the Bishop in the Diocese of London.[2]

Sources

  1. Whalley-147 was created by Patrick Barnum through the import of barnum.ged on May 19, 2014. Edited for compliance with WikiTree requirements and source citations updated on 6 January 2015.
  2. Source: #S1071 TMPLT FIELD Name: Page
  • Whaley, Rev. Samuel. English Record of the Whaley Family and Its Branches in America. Ithaca, N.Y: Andrus & Church, 1901). Pages 70-90 et seq
  • Goldman, Howard A. “That Good Old Man – Whoever He Was.” Old Rhode Island, vol. 2, Issue 6. July, 1992. pp. 32-40.
  • Stiles, Ezra. A History of Three of the Judges of King Charles I. Major-General Whalley, Major-General Goffe, and Colonel Dixwell: Who at the Restoration of 1660, Fled to America; and were Secreted and Concealed, in Massachusetts and Connecticut, for Near Thirty Years. Hartford, CT: Printed by Elisha Babcock, 1794.
  • Updike, Wilkins. History of the Episcopal Church in Narragansett, RI. New York: H.M. Onderdonk, 1847. Picture of the Whaley home, p. 352.
  • Information provided by Robert G. Nohavec <nohavec@xmission.com>, 3 May 2006
  • National biographical publishing co., pub. (1881). The Biographical cyclopedia of representative men of Rhode Island. Providence: National biographical Publishing Co.
  • Austin, J. O. (1887). The genealogical dictionary of Rhode Island: Comprising three generations of settlers who came before 1690: with many families carried to the fourth generation. Albany: J. Munsell's Sons." (p. 221)


More: Family Tree & Genealogy Tools





Search
Searching for someone else?
First: Last:

Do you have a GEDCOM? Login to have every name in your tree searched. It's free (like everything on WikiTree).

DNA
No known carriers of Theophilus's Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA have taken yDNA or mtDNA tests.

Have you taken a DNA test for genealogy? Login to add it.



Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile.
  • Private Messages: Contact the Profile Managers privately: Shirley Becker and Mary Murdock. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)
  • Public Q&A: These will appear above and in the Genealogist-to-Genealogist (G2G) Forum. (Best for questions directed to the wider genealogy community.)

There are no public comments yet.