Does anybody know any information of Sir Walter Scott's wife Margaret Charlotte Charpentier

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Margaret Charlotte Charpentier was the wife of Sir Walter Scott, there is a family legend that she had some realtives that settled in England, and changed their name to Carpenter. Jean Charpentier her father residended in London, St Georges Square and records shoe that Margaret was baptised there, Sir Walter Scott had 2 daughter, and 2  sons born at Abbotsford House, Melrose, Roxburghshire, Scotland, but there are no records found as yet of any siblings, any leads please?
in Genealogy Help by Vic Styles G2G Crew (400 points)
edited by Chris Whitten

5 Answers

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Best answer
Go to   thepeerages.com.  Click on  surnames, click on C.  ,arrow down to Charpentier, click that, then on list, that pops up, click  Margaret born 1770. From there, click others in the family.  This site lists the sources for the information given.
by C E G2G6 Mach 3 (36.2k points)
selected by Jillaine Smith
I typed peerages this morning half asleep.  It should   thepeerage.com   . Did you fiund everything/
I just saw the gold star.  Thank youvery much.
+1 vote

Her name was actually Charlotte Genevieve Charpentier which was changed to Carpenter when she first came to England.  She was "ward" of Lord Downshire as her parents were both deceased, it was Walter Scott's family who lived in George Square and where he spent his early years, not Charlotte's parents who were dead.  When walter and Charlotte first married they lived in George Street, but later moved to two further addresses.  These are facts not legend?  I suggest you check Wikipedia on the link I have included below, although this information can be be found in many places so I cannot understand why you feel the need to appeal for "leads"?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Scott

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+1 vote

Her name was actually Charlotte Genevieve Charpentier which was changed to Carpenter when she first came to England.  She was "ward" of Lord Downshire as her parents were both deceased, it was Walter Scott's family who lived in George Square and where he spent his early years, not Charlotte's parents who were dead.  When walter and Charlotte first married they lived in George Street, but later moved to two further addresses.  These are facts not legend?  I suggest you check Wikipedia on the link I have included below, although this information can be be found in many places so I cannot understand why you feel the need to appeal for "leads"?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Scott

by
+1 vote

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, the son of a solicitor Walter Scott and Anne, a daughter of professor of medicine. An early illness – polio – left him lame in the right leg. Six of his 11 brothers and sisters died in infancy. However, Scott grew up to be a man over six feet and great physical endurance.

Scott's interest in the old Border tales and ballads had early been awakened, and he devoted much of his leisure to the exploration of the Border country. His early years Scott spent in Sandy-Know, in the residence of his paternal grandfather. There his grandmother told him tales of old heroes. At the age of eight he returned to Edinburgh. He attended Edinburgh High School (1779-1783) and studied at Edinburgh University arts and law (1783-86, 1789-92). At the age of sixteen he had already started to collect old ballads and later translated into English Gottfried Bürger's ballads 'The Wild Huntsman' and 'Lenore' and 'Goetz of Berlichingen' (1799) from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's play. Scott was apprenticed to his father in 1786 and in 1792 he was called to the bar. In 1799 he was appointed sheriff depute of the county of Selkirk. After an unsuccessful love affair with Williamina Belsches of Fettercairn – she married Sir William Forbes – Scott married in 1797 Margaret Charlotte Charpentier (or Charpenter), daughter of Jean Charpentier of Lyon in France. They had five children.

 
by Sean Liddell G2G Crew (580 points)
Sir Walter Scott was my Great Grandfather X3 on my mothers side.
+1 vote

The following is from ODNB (I have extracted it in case you do not have a subscription)

In marrying Charlotte, Scott took considerable risks. He made no enquiries about her, and could not answer his family's questions about her background. In fact, she was French, the daughter of Jean François Charpentier of Lyons and his wife, Élie Marguerite Volère, also known as Margaret Charlotte Volère (d. 1788), and had been brought up a Catholic, although she was baptized an Anglican in 1787. Her parents had separated about 1780, possibly after her mother had had an affair with a young Welshman. When precisely mother, daughter, and son came to England has not been determined, but it is known that Charlotte's mother returned to Paris in 1786, leaving behind her children who became the wards of the earl of Hillsborough, later marquess of Downshire. As the latter married in 1786 it has been presumed that Charlotte's mother had been his mistress, but there is no known evidence to support the presumption. When Scott proposed to Charlotte, he did not know all this. He got engaged before he told his parents anything about her; he did not report that she was French (Charlotte looked foreign and throughout her life spoke English with a strong French accent); he said that she had an annuity of £500 from her brother, when, in fact, she received an irregular allowance. Scott was marrying an ‘unknown’; he was not marrying for social position; he was not marrying for property. He was marrying for love and he was marrying a woman to whom he was intensely attracted.

by Bill N G2G6 Mach 1 (11.3k points)

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