Found birth after checking christenings in 48 different parts of Vienna, phew.

+10 votes
88 views

I have never done any research in Austria before, and it took some time before I came so far as to making this search
https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/suchen/?place=wien&diocese=&date_filter=on&date_range=1906,1931

and then checking christening books one by one (I started from the end of the list) until I found the correct one.

Now, I'd be interested to hear if there would have been a faster and smarter way to do this? wink

I'm happy anyway.

in The Tree House by Maria Lundholm G2G6 Pilot (122k points)
congratulations!
Thanks :)

enlightenedyes I'd call your labor Heroic and your success Fabulous 

Thank you very much Susan! laugh

Would it have been faster to start from the beginning of the list? I often get the feeling that when I start a manual search like this from the end, the target is near the beginning - and when I start from the beginning, the target is near the end. Me and my negative thinking ;-)

I don't gamble, but I do see it as a bit of a lottery. wink

2 Answers

+4 votes
 
Best answer

If you know the place of living, there is a map with the corresponding parish borders: Pfarrgrenzen Wien vor 1784

If you're very lucky, the name was already indexed: Search @ Familia-Austria

Or try to ask at the Austria-L mailing list (provide all info you have from this person), there are specialized genealogists for vienna that may help.

by Jochen Oberreiter G2G6 Mach 1 (10.7k points)
selected by Maria Lundholm
Jochen, thank you very much for your summary!

I only knew that he was born in Wien at a specific date, which was probably correct.
+5 votes

Since you were dealing with a birth from 1910, you could have used the Vienna addressbooks, which are online for 1859 to 1941 at https://www.digital.wienbibliothek.at/wbrobv/periodical/titleinfo/5311. This is somewhat tricky to use, but with some practice can be quite useful.

Going to the 1910 volume (click on the year number, not the PDF, which is huge) gets you to this: https://www.digital.wienbibliothek.at/wbrobv/periodical/titleinfo/230383. Band 2 has the name index; clicking through that to the "Namensverzeichnis" gets you this page, which has 7 entries for Hintereggers, with their street addresses (as well as the district number).

Now if you open up again the general page for the 1910 volume (https://www.digital.wienbibliothek.at/wbrobv/periodical/titleinfo/230383) in a separate window, go to Band 1, which has a street index (Straßenverzeichnis) here . Note that it has both "Straßen in den einundzwanzig Gemeinde-Bezirken" and a list of the "Katholische Pfarren".

The first Hinteregger, Alois, lived in Margarethenstr. 151. If you look in the "Straßen in den einundzwanzig Gemeinde-Bezirken" here, you will see that odd street numbers 51 and above are in parish 21, which, by reference to the parish list at https://www.digital.wienbibliothek.at/wbrobv/periodical/pageview/125327) is St. Josef in Margarethen.

Repeating this process for the next Hinteregger, Anton, who lived in Goldschlagstr. 98 in District XIV/1, you will see here that that is in parish 49, which per the parish list is the parish Zum heiligen Rudolph in Rudolfsheim (which is indeed where you found your guy).

These address books will be a valuable resource for tracing the father, his job titles over time, his addresses over time, and when he first and last appeared in Vienna.

by Anonymous Geschwind G2G6 Mach 8 (82.0k points)
Wow, that's cool! Thank you so much for your effort to explain this to me!

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