What's the naming convention for Polish feminine LNABs?

+1 vote
93 views

I'd like to add a new profile for a woman who was born in Poland and migrated to the US. Options for her LNAB are:

  • Her surname in her marriage record is Sytkowna, the unmarried feminine form of her father's name, because that is a thing in Polish
  • Her father's name is given in the marriage record as Sytkowski
  • In her US records her LNAB is given as Citek

What's the appropriate LNAB to use and why? Is there a guideline? I searched and could not find anything on the relevant Polish or Slavic Roots projects.

Thank you!

in Policy and Style by Cheryl Hammond G2G6 Mach 2 (22.1k points)
Looks like this question has been answered, but I wanted to share the link I just found (Poland Project's section on naming conventions):

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Project:Poland/Resource_Library#Polish_Naming_Conventions
Ooooo thank you!

2 Answers

+2 votes
 
Best answer

Surely it should be Sytkowna, as that was her LNAB in the place and culture where she was born.

by Jessica Key G2G6 Pilot (202k points)
selected by Cheryl Hammond
Current Last Name would be Citek and Sytkowski could be put in the Other Last Names, if she could be seen in sources with that name.
Wouldn't her CLN be whatever the last name of her husband was, with Citek going to other last names?
I thought the question was stating that Citek was her married name.  I didn't look for the profile.

Jessica - that's what I was leaning toward. Do we know if that's official Project guidance?

Linda - agree with use of OLN. I want to make sure I do the best I can on LNAB before I create the profile.

Melanie - yes, CLN in this case would be her married name. If she had stayed in Poland she would have used the married feminine form of her husband's name, in this case Michalska. Among those who migrated to the US, it's sometimes ambiguous which version they used during their lifetime. If the only existing records are together with their husband (like the census), and/or if they Americanized it, they'd show up under his spelling of his name, in this case Michalski. That appears to be what this person did, as she was still using the Michalski spelling on her own after she was widowed. 

Sometimes if they remained in an immigrant community/church, you might find a burial record or a grave marker with the traditional feminine spelling, though. I don't have that here so I'd probably go with CLN Michalski.

I thought the question was stating that Citek was her married name.  I didn't look for the profile.

-

I didn't, either.  I just saw :

In her US records her LNAB is given as Citek

 

Put all the possible spelling variations into Other Last Name, to avoid duplicates from being created.
+1 vote
Cheryl, there is no official LNAB guidance per se  with Slavic projects but yes, you are correct. In Europe, it's best to record the wife's married surname as written in records for that time period. In America, a lot of those surname endings are omitted.

Use all variations in OLN fields if possible.
by Maggie N. G2G6 Pilot (881k points)

What about LNAB for women? Should their surname at birth be the unmarried form, if known?

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