Looking for my elusive ancestor

+1 vote
176 views
I am looking for information about William Woodgate, born 1811 at Brenchley, Kent, England. My Heritage has information, but I don't trust 'Free Trial' sites since I was billed $100 while I was telling the site that I couldn't read grey on black text!

The area was knee-deep in Woodgate families at that time, but apparently three unrelated trees, which I don't believe.
in The Tree House by John Woodgate G2G Crew (810 points)

2 Answers

+3 votes
https://www.findmypast.co.uk/transcript?id=PRS%2FKENT%2FBAP%2F1011070

shows William Woodgate christened on the 23rd September 1810 at All Saints Church, Brenchley, Kent, the son of John Woodgate and Charlotte Norman.
by Michael Pickup G2G5 (5.4k points)
Thanks very much.
It's another of those 'sign up' sites that I don't trust not to accept cancellations. I'm not paying £80 for one web page!
For something this recent FamilySearch is adequate. No fees!
I can't see that page; I can't get beyond the subscription page. Also, I think that may be the wrong William. I think his father was probably Daniel, but as I said, they were thick on the ground and it is difficult to untangle the threads, particularly as some had children before marrying.
Any idea when your William got married?  (Presumably, if he is an ancestor and not a collateral, he did.)  Any idea when he died?
+1 vote

This is what Michael found, unfortunately the link he gave is not shareable

First name(s) William

Last name Woodgate

Baptism date 23 Sep 1810

Baptism year 1810

Place Brenchley, All Saints

Father's first name(s) John

Mother's first name(s) Charlotte

Mother's last name Norman

County Kent

Country England

Archive Kent History & Library Centre

Archive reference P45/1/A/3

Register type Baptisms & burials

Year range 1764-1812

Record set Kent Baptisms

Category Life Events (BDMs)

Subcategory Parish Baptisms

Collections from England, Great Britain

© Findmypast

by Marion Poole G2G Astronaut (1.2m points)

Oh -- the twins, births registered 4th Quarter 1906.

Please don't use "family search" as a source.  There are actual sources on fs that you can copy and paste -- or feel free to ask me for all the GRO references I have saved to my text document.
Why should I not use any source that seems to help?

Because just the words "family search" tell nobody anything. The idea behind adding sources is that anyone else coming along can look at them, see specifically where the information came from, and look it up for themselves if they wish.

If we just put "BDM" or "ancestry", or "family search" it doesn't really give anyone any information.

Take a look at Herbert James's profile, and Florence Annie's.  You'll see I used the GRO, and family search for the sources -- but the two citations on Florence's profile that are from FS are a copy and paste of their offered (preferred?) citation, simply placed between ref tags.

I'm a beginner. I don't know how to do this:

You'll see I used the GRO, and family search for the sources -- but the two citations on Florence's profile that are from FS are a copy and paste of their offered (preferred?) citation, simply placed between ref tags.

What is the GRO and how do you get to it? Is it costly? I expect you are a professional geneaologist and can afford to pay big fees for access to information.

ME?!  A professional?!  surprise 

No way!  I'm a non-professional family historian who has been doing family research on and off for about 40 or so years is all.

The GRO .. the General Records Office of the United Kingdom ---

England & Wales births, deaths and marriages registrations, General Register Office United Kingdom, Southport, England, HM Passport Office

It is FREE, but you do need to register, and sign in each time.  https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/indexes_search.asp

The search results cannot be linked to, hence the copy and paste of the info I posted for Herbert James about 6 posts up from this one.

I am also unable to afford the fees charged by ancestry and other "for pay" websites.  When I was in Australia, I could visit my local and State Library and access microfilm and microfiche for free (yes, I am that old), and my State Archives where I could get print-offs of information for a small cost (supposedly the paper and ink).

I have friends who have done lookups for me on pay to view sites -- and other Wikitreers who have also done the same.  All you need to do is ask for help, and someone will jump in and help.

If you check James George's profile, you'll see I added census information gleaned from FamilySearch, and cited using the FS citations for each separate one.

It's easy enough, once you get used to it.  You're still finding your feet, so don't expect to be able to do it all right away.  smiley

I think that 40 years experience makes you at least an honorary professional (acting, unpaid). Thank you for the explanation. I have now registered, but it's too late to do any more searching.

Any time you need help, you only need to reach out and ask.  smiley

Thank you very much. I do need help that the GRO is too young to provide. I am looking for information about Henry Woodgate of Tudeley, died 1746. There were lots of Henry Woodgates in the area at the time. This is probably the poorest one.

As  general question, if a person born out of wedlock adopted his patronymic, without benefit of deed poll, who might challenge that? I suppose that the squire or priest might, or an ill-wisher.

As  general question, if a person born out of wedlock adopted his patronymic, without benefit of deed poll, who might challenge that? I suppose that the squire or priest might, or an ill-wisher.

commented by John Woodgate

.

I don't know so much about English law in that regard, but in many jurisdictions usage of a name, so long as it is not to commit fraud of any kind, is usually a legal name if the usage continues.

Many step-children were named for the stepfather's last name after the marriage to the mother, without any formal adoptions, and the last name was as legal as their birth name.   Children born before parents were married were regarded as legitimate after the parents were married.  Children born without a father being named might be the child of the man the mother marries within months, or even years, of the birth - but also may not be.  It seems to have been up to the couple what last name the children carried -- or the census enumerators / government clerks.

I've a cousin who was always known by his father's name, despite being born 5 years before his parents married, and registered with his mother's last name.  I don't think, even as a baby, he was ever known as (name) (mother's last name) except on that one document.  There was never any legal change of name, just usage.

(Don't know if any of that helps.)

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