At one time, a U.S. woman lost her citizenship if she married a foreigner

+5 votes
134 views

Recently I have run across several U.S. women who were citizens by birth or naturalization, but were recorded as aliens (non-citizens) after they married a man of another nationality (something that seems peculiar and is offensive to my modern sensibilities).

The article “When Saying ‘I Do’ Meant Giving Up Your U.S. Citizenship.” by Meg Hacker at https://www.archives.gov/files/publications/prologue/2014/spring/citizenship.pdf  explained this for me. It describes the history the law that cancelled the citizenship status of U.S. women who married non-U.S. men between 1907 to 1922.

Thanks are due to Justin Cascio, who posted a link to this article on a profile where I happened to see it.

in The Tree House by Ellen Smith G2G Astronaut (1.2m points)

2 Answers

+4 votes
I was born in California and had lived there for all my 18 years when I married a New Yorker. We did not leave California, but when I registered at a state university in California a year later I was required to pay out-of-state fees.

We (my wonderful father) got an attorney and I was admitted to the school as a California resident.

Being a woman sure took away rights in the old days, my husband was considered my guardian, so. . . .
by Kristina Adams G2G6 Pilot (211k points)
Glad you successfully reclaimed your status as a Californian, Kristina!
+8 votes
When the first group of seven Astronauts was selected, of course none were women.  A couple of years later, a second group was going to be selected to expand the corps.  Following much pressure to include women (with arguments that they are inherently better qualified by virtue of lower weight, smaller size, and better psychological response to solitude), applications were solicited from women, from which one was to be selected.

I was in college at the time with major in aerospace engineering and fully met requirements for math/science academic background, competitive diving and summer jobs as a lifeguard met requirement of strong swimming skills.  I hoped that I would be at the top in those areas to make up for the lack of my piloting experience and I applied with great excitement.

First I received a letter saying that I was one of the 1,000 initially selected from the 10,000 applications and was invited to take a full day test of academic, psychological, and ability.  After that, I received a letter saying that I was one of the 100 still in consideration and was invited to Washington, DC for a complete physical and water skill testing.  I responded and informed them that my name had changed because I had just gotten married.  They wrote back and said that I was no longer eligible because they would not consider a married woman.

If not for the fact that I expected to fail the vision test, I probably would have had the fastest annulment in history.  Funny - all the men in the first group were married.  This happened in 1962.
by Gaile Connolly G2G6 Pilot (873k points)
Amazing how marriage took away so many rights of females on the past. Nice story Gaile!  Fantastic that you got down to final 100. That is a great accomplishment!

Thanks for sharing the story, Gaile.

I suppose that they considered married men and unmarried women to be free agents allowed to make their own decisions, but a married woman was (somewhat like a slave) the possession of a man, and they did not want to expose a man’s possession to danger.   sad

Or perhaps they were afraid that married women might get pregnant... frown

Related questions

+8 votes
0 answers
+8 votes
1 answer
+10 votes
2 answers
+5 votes
1 answer
+6 votes
1 answer
+4 votes
0 answers
45 views asked May 19, 2019 in The Tree House by C Ryder G2G6 Mach 8 (81.5k points)
+7 votes
1 answer

WikiTree  ~  About  ~  Help Help  ~  Search Person Search  ~  Surname:

disclaimer - terms - copyright

...