Another conundrum of siblings apparently born only 6 weeks apart...

+1 vote
71 views
... with images of both handwritten birth records to back it up. These are the children of my first cousin 4 times removed, and the birth records say they were both born in 1846.

Yes, I have read the other forum posts about the exceedingly rare possibility that this can actually happen naturally. I also personally know a couple who adopted a baby, but while they were going through that process, the wife became pregnant, so they now have 2 babies who were born 2 months apart. But in the case I'm looking at, there's nothing in the records I've found (so far) that indicates an adoption.

There are several online family trees with no verified sources that claim the son was born in 1846 and the daughter in 1848. And the 1850 US Census lists the son as age 4 and the daughter as age 2. However, that is not what the Vermont Vital Records birth certificates say.

I have not set up profiles for these two; only for their parents.
I put notes with links to the birth certificates in their father's profile (Willey-2317).

Anybody got any ideas about this one? Which source should one believe... the birth certificate or the census?
WikiTree profile: Daniel Willey
in WikiTree Help by Carolyn Comings G2G6 Mach 2 (25.7k points)
Thank you all so much for your help and suggestions. :) I will make notes of them to add to my bag 'o' tricks.

1 Answer

+5 votes

I go with transcription error.  That card is a copy of information from earlier town records.  The census and Auretta’s marriage both support an 1848 birth.  

Here’s an earlier, correct record: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-899D-YNNK?i=31&cc=1987653&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AQPQP-PG5Q

by Kathie Forbes G2G6 Pilot (405k points)
Thank you, that does make much more sense. And apparently my research skills are not yet to the point where I can find everything there is to know. :)

I found the same thing, so came to the same conclusion.

It is always important to know if the "original handwritten" document was original to the time, or a later copy or transcription, also handwritten.  Just because it's not typewritten doesn't make it the original.

FamilySearch has filmed early town and church records all over the U.S. Not all the films are indexed, but if not, you can search their catalog by location and then search manually.  When there’s a discrepancy it’s always worth checking both Ancestry and FamilySearch.
Carolyn, I've changed the Find a Grave link to the full Find a Grave citation, formatted with the Wikitree template, so you can do the same for the next one.

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