Need help with parents of Mary Bates of Linclolnshire b 1787 [closed]

+2 votes
101 views
Mary Bates claiming her birth place as Claypole in Lincolnshire in the census records, was married at West Deeping, Lincolnshire to William Collins on 22 Jun 1814.  I have found no record of Marys birth nor parents, so have hit a brick wall.
WikiTree profile: Mary Collins
closed with the note: Qestion answer suggests mary Brown, which is a better fit to what we know about husband William.  Many thanks to kk whi responded.
in Genealogy Help by Nick Miller G2G2 (2.8k points)
closed by Nick Miller

Sorry, I haven't found the birth, but I'm curious where Old Harrow came from in the bio. On the census it looks like Grate Berreys (the address above that entry is Berreys Little? - not very readable).

This might be useful though, from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription)

Kent & Sussex Courier - Friday 17 April 1874
Auction April 22nd 1874
A Rectorial Tithe Rent Charge of £13 10s secured upon the property of - Sherriff, Esq., known as “Berry’s Farm” in the parish of Cudham, Kent, 117a 0r 29p, in the occupation of Mrs. Collins.

Thanks for this.  The full transcript that states Old Harrow appears on here: https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/sources/LWZW-NRH.  However, your viewing of the original copy suggests that the person who transcribed the record may have been misled, as they were  at Berries farm by 1871 census.

4 Answers

0 votes

I couldn't find a birth record for her either but at the time of her marriage her parish was given as West Deeping and William Collins' parish was given as nearby Langtoft  

https://www.freereg.org.uk/search_records/5f588f32f493fd851466af9b/mary-bates-william-collins-marriage-lincolnshire-west-deeping-1814-06-22?locale=en

by Jean Hollis G2G6 Mach 1 (13.4k points)
+1 vote
In the 1851 census, it has that she is from Claypole, which may not be the same couple that you are looking for. In the 1851 Surrey census, she is 65, and they have a 21-year-old daughter Elizabeth. In the 1841 Kent census, she is 50, and Elizabeth is not listed.

I see her age on the tombstone, but they can be incorrect. They married in 1814, the image of their marriage record states that it was with the consent of a parent. That means she had to be under 21 years old at the time.

It is possible that two different families were thought to be one.
by Laura DeSpain G2G6 Pilot (355k points)
It looks like Elizabeth is on the same census in 1841 (Surrey) but in the farm cottage next door, the record immediately above with 2 servants, age 11. William is a farm bailiff, so could very easily have been a farmer by the next census.
Her age on the 1841 census would fit with the fact that she would have been under 21 when she married. The 8 extra years in the 1851 census would mean that she would not have needed parental consent. If she was born in 1787 then in 1814 she would have been about 27 years old. This needs more thorough research.
I have the original enumerators report.  It is quite likely that Elizabeth was learning domestic service at the neighbours house.
0 votes
Given the poor transcriptions I suspect that the birthplace was likely to be Whaplode which is near West Deeping.

There is a Mary Bates christened there in 1785.

The Rushington should be Ruskington, Lincolnshire and Olton in Hampshire should be Alton from the same poor transcription.
by Hilary Gadsby G2G6 Pilot (181k points)
0 votes
Are we sure her name is Bates? There's a William Collins Mary Brown marriage in 1807 Marston, Lincs. Marston is 6 miles from Claypole, and the date fits in better with son William born 1809.

Edit: His parish was Flawborough, Notts which is 15 miles from Fulbeck where he was born, and 8 from Claypole. Hers was Marston.

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP7R-RZ6L
by Gill Whitehouse G2G6 Mach 1 (14.1k points)
edited by Gill Whitehouse
Many thanks.  I’ll go with Mary Brown.
Well, I'm not sure that "I'll go with" constitutes research and verification, so if it's wrong, it's not my fault.
She is a much better candidate geographically.  Folk did not travel far back then.  A horse was good for seven miles before it needed a rest and refuelling.  Which is why towns are spaced at about 7 miles along our post roads.

Unfortunately there are more William Browns (her daddy) than you can shake a stick at.

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