German genealogy: how do I find more information about my grandmother's family: Beck, Kallscheid

+5 votes
284 views

I have come up against a wall several times regarding my grandmother's ancestors. I only have the information she has given me and nothing more.

 

Her father is Lawrence Christian Beck (4/5/1901-abt 1973). Possibly born in Frankfurt. Lived there when my grandmother was born but moved away to southern Germany during the war after his wife (my grandmother's mother) died.

 

Her mother is Maria Kallscheid (10/12/1904-6/26/1943). Possibly born in Frankfurt. Died there for sure.

 

any help is appreciated!  Even a good source for Germany geneaology would be great.

 

UPDATE: I found some more info. 

Lawrence Beck parents: Lorenz Beck & Anna Weiershausen (died 1906)

Maria Kallscheid parents: Christian Kallscheid & Margaret Klein.

WikiTree profile: Lorenz Beck
in Genealogy Help by Trey Price G2G Rookie (290 points)
edited by Trey Price
More specific information might go a long way to finding the parents.
I agree. But I have what I have.  I did come across some info on their parents in another family tree I put together a few years ago. I'll update the original question with the info.

I looked up Beck at surnamdb.com to see what they had to say about the origin of that surname. They did not have any information on the Kallscheid surname however.          

Last name: Beck

This interesting name has a number of possible origins, all of which are equally likely to be the source for the modern surname. Firstly, it may be a Northern topographical surname for someone who lived beside a stream or brook, derived from the Northern Middle English "bekke", stream, originally from the Old Norse "bekkr". Secondly, it may be of Norman (French) locational origin, deriving from any of the various places in Northern France named with the Old Norman French word "bec", stream, such as Bec Hellouin in the province of Eure; the first recordings of the surname is from this source (see below). Thirdly, the name may derive from a medieval English nickname for someone with a prominent nose, from the Middle English "beke", beak of a bird, from the Old French "bec". Finally, Beck as a surname may be a metonymic occupational name for a maker, seller or user of a matlock or pickaxe, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "becca", matlock. An early settler in the New World Colonies was Henry Beck, who embarked from the Port of London on the "Blessing" in July 1635, bound for New England. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is described thus: "Or (gold), two bars dancettee sable (black) surmounted by the fasces in pale proper a chief azure (blue) thereon three annulets argent (silver)". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter Bec, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Buckinghamshire, during the reign of King William 1, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2015

They have information the the origin of Klein if you want to check it out. It's a free service. 

German origin for Beck is baker (Bäcker, often shortened to Beck in street vernacular).

Last name: Baker

This ancient surname is of Olde English pre 8th century origins deriving from the word 'boeccure'. The surname is always occupational, but not always for a maker of bread. There are a number of possible origins and these include an official with special responsibilities for the baking ovens in a monastery or castle, as well as the keeper of the 'communal kitchen' in a town or village, since most of the humbler households had no cooking facilities other than a pot over a fire. The right to be in charge of this service and to exact money or loaves in return for its use, was in many parts of Britain, a hereditary feudal privilege. Less often the surname may have been acquired by someone noted for specifically baking fine bread or as an owner of a kiln for the baking of pottery or even bricks. The surname is first recorded in the late 12th Century, and early recordings include such examples as Robert Bakere, a witness in the Assize Court Rolls of Lancashire for the year 1246, and Walter le Backere in the rolls of the county of Hampshire for 1280 a.d. The female form of the name is 'Baxter'. There have been no less than forty two 'Baker' entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and during the latter half of the 19th century the name was arguably the most famous in the country. This was owing to the exploits of Sir Samuel Baker, who with Stanley and Livingstone, was the greatest African explorer, and his brother, Valentine Baker, the famous Cavalry leader, known world wide as 'Baker Pasha'. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William le Bakere, which was dated 1177, in the "Pipe Rolls of Norfolk", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2015

The Baker surname  info mentions the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk. Norfolk is part of East Anglia.  The Angles were one of several Germanic groups that settled parts of England. 


 

1 Answer

+3 votes
20th century vital records should be available locally. What Frankfurt are you dealing with? Frankfurt am Main or an der Oder? Records for the parents, if before 1874, would be kept by the churches locally as there was no central  or civil registration then.
by Helmut Jungschaffer G2G6 Pilot (529k points)
I am looking for Frankfurt am Main.  I am looking for anything I can find online now as I am located in Texas.  This is helpful to know. Thank you!

Birth certificates for Frankfurt can be ordered using this form:

https://www.frankfurt.de/sixcms/detail.php?id=2778&_ffmpar[_id_inhalt]=5893305

It's only in German and may get pricy (€10 for the document and €12.25 for every 15 minutes record search). Another option would be to ask for an excerpt from the Familienbuch. Their email address is buergeramt.zentrale@stadt-frankfurt.de
maybe they can tell you more ahead of time.

Related questions

+10 votes
4 answers
+1 vote
1 answer
+1 vote
1 answer
0 votes
1 answer
0 votes
1 answer
100 views asked Mar 13, 2019 in Genealogy Help by Anonymous Rankin G2G6 Mach 3 (35.4k points)
0 votes
1 answer
93 views asked Feb 12, 2019 in Genealogy Help by Anonymous Rankin G2G6 Mach 3 (35.4k points)
+3 votes
2 answers
+3 votes
1 answer

WikiTree  ~  About  ~  Help Help  ~  Search Person Search  ~  Surname:

disclaimer - terms - copyright

...