Where do you get your information?

+5 votes
290 views
I have researched my Family tree and it has traced our bloodline all the way to Ragnar Lodbrock and Aslaug Sigurdsdatter. My questions are of a medical interest because i have reason to believe my son and cousin could both suffer from the same medical condition discribed in the stories of Ivar the Bonless who was the son of Aslaug and Ragnar accoring to ancestry.com .
WikiTree profile: Ragnar Sigurdsson
in Genealogy Help by
retagged by John Atkinson
Great question and great answers all around!  Mags

3 Answers

+4 votes
I search public archives , census records, and newpaper articles , I also belong to other groups and share info with other searchers, i hope this was helpful ... you can always ask someone on wiki tree for help, thats the name of the game around here!
by Michele Chandler G2G Crew (780 points)
+5 votes
I'd be careful about relying on the family trees on Ancestry.com for your information, as you will often find links between people that are unsubstantiated and invariably unsourced.  For instance, as you might have seen on the Wikitree biography, it is doubtful that Ragnar ever existed as an historical person, only in the various Norse Sagas.

For medieval history and genealogy, the European Aristocrats project (I've added the tag euroaristo to your question) finds the Medieval Lands database by Charles Cawley, a good starting point.  You can find it here http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/

John Atkinson, co-leader European Aristocrats project.
by John Atkinson G2G6 Pilot (486k points)
+5 votes
There is no proof that Ragnar Lodbrok ever really existed. Look at [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok Wikipedia] as an example. When it comes to people who existed before 1000 A.D. in the scandinavian countries you should be very careful. There are very few written sources and most of them are of much later dates.
by Lena Svensson G2G6 Mach 5 (50.8k points)

To add to Lena's comment ... Although Ragnar is a composite of historical figures, packaged for Medieval entertainment, there are real sources documenting his sons, and Ingvar inn Beinlausi (Ivar the Boneless) in particular. 

But apparently... there's some debate over the translation of Ivar's nickname "inn Beinlausi." While it's commonly said to be "the Boneless" ... there's also some who believe the translation is wrong. One theory says it relates to a problem with "impotence."

Related questions

+3 votes
1 answer
+3 votes
3 answers
+4 votes
2 answers
+7 votes
1 answer
277 views asked Jun 29, 2016 in Genealogy Help by Liz Shifflett G2G6 Pilot (466k points)
+8 votes
1 answer
90 views asked Aug 29, 2018 in The Tree House by James LaLone G2G6 Mach 5 (58.0k points)
+3 votes
1 answer
117 views asked Sep 26 in Genealogy Help by Monica Edmunds G2G6 Mach 3 (30.5k points)

WikiTree  ~  About  ~  Help Help  ~  Search Person Search  ~  Surname:

disclaimer - terms - copyright

...