Birth and Death Years in 17th Century England and Colonies

+5 votes
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Years for births and deaths in the 17th century sometimes are written as two years separated by a forward slash (e.g., 1650/51). Yesterday, I read in 'The Pioneers of Maine and New Hampshire...' by Pope (1908) that this is done because:

March 25 was New Year's Day in England and her colonies in the seventeenth century.... From January 1 to March 25, durng which some other nations used the new year number, they often wrote a double date. (pp. x-xi)

In our Wikitree profiles, I don't think we're given this option (are we?). Is there a style rule for entering 'double years'? I looked in the 'Style' pages but wasn't certain I found the correct answer.

in Policy and Style by Jeffry Ricker G2G4 (4.3k points)
Not just in the Colonies also in England; but Scotland changed earlier and just to make it awkward some English dates use the Gregorian Calender before 1752.

http://www.adsb.co.uk/date_and_time/calendar_reform_1752/

 .I haven't yet put in any dates on my own family tree from before this. My home software allows me to state whether it is a Julian or Gregorian date ; if I transfer info using a gedcom,is this also transferred?

1 Answer

+1 vote
 
Best answer

The style guideline on "double-dating" is to use the later of the two years. ie. Feb 3, 1653/4 - Use Feb 3 1654.

Here's the Help Page.

 

by Anne B G2G Astronaut (1.1m points)
selected by Jeffry Ricker
Thank you. I saw that page but didn't see the rule-of-thumb in the last sentence of 'Julian vs. Gregorian Calendar'

Best, Jeff

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