What skills/abilities have you picked up from your Genealogy research?

+14 votes
344 views
I've been navigating and creating profiles on WikiTree for about four months now, and managed to link to about three other family trees. One reason I've been so predigious in such a short time (at least from my POV) is that I am presently between jobs, and am temporarily, financially-secure.

But now I need to depart from my temporary honeymoon, and get back to looking. Employers always want to know what you've been doing with your time, whether it was spent volunteering, going to school, or teaching yourself new skills online.

I think researching your family tree and trying to understand what genetic tests reveal and how to use them constitute a certain level of skill!

So if people could supply me with examples as to what skills they feel they've gained in the process of doing genealogy, I would be very grateful.

My experience might not be the same as your experience, but it would help me get more of an idea of what I things I should put in my master resume.

People don't always think about the skills they pick up when they do something for enjoyment (I could do genealogy research all day!) as opposed to job-training, employment experience, and education.

PS: Asking the question a different way ---For people who are employed, has your interest in genealogy translated into any skills you were able to apply to your job?
in The Tree House by Michael Hammond G2G6 Mach 1 (11.7k points)

5 Answers

+9 votes
I'm retired so job skills don't apply.

I've learned what "documentation" means, that you reference a source so others can verify that you really did get your data from that source, didn't just make it up.
by Tom Bredehoft G2G6 Pilot (194k points)
+10 votes
Michael, I was trained as a lawyer.  Even so, I think I have learned more about critical analysis from my genealogy than I did in law school.  Just because something is written down. "it ain't necessarily so." I have also learned how to synthesize information from many sources to write a coherent biography, with sources.
by Vic Watt G2G6 Pilot (330k points)
+9 votes
Research skills for sure.

I agree with Vic, about Critical Analysis, and synthesizing from multiple sources.

I would also add Collaboration skills. Learning how to communicate and work with others to achieve a common goal and have common work.
by Eric Weddington G2G6 Pilot (240k points)
+8 votes
I started doing genealogy research in my 20's and found that I loved doing research in old court and deed records, learning to read plat maps, analyzing the records I found, and looking for other records, such as church and parish records.  My interest eventually lead to a degree in legal studies and, due to lack of funds, a decision to complete the requirements for paralegal certification instead of going to law school.  I worked for 35 years as a corporate paralegal, and did genealogy research in my spare time and on summer vacations.  My legal background has definately helped me be more critical in analyzing the type of source documents I use to prove my genealogy research.
by Carol Wilder G2G6 Mach 4 (48.9k points)
+3 votes
I hope by now you have a great job but in case it's helpful to anyone else.

I actually referenced my genealogy research specifically in a job interview once. Creating a research plan, organization,  learning to look at a problem from different angles, tracking what you find, substantiating your work, proof statements, analysis of evidence, learning to step outside the box and think critically.  Working with others on research efforts. Execution of a plan/project.

Lots of good skills learned.
by Sharon Ray G2G6 Mach 1 (11.9k points)

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