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Hello my name is Karly Polen. I am looking to find some more information on my surname as well as my mother's maiden name, which is Few and my grandmother's maiden name (on my mother's side) which is Kambrick. I have had no luck searching on my own and I am new to all of this so I'm sure there is something I can do better.
in Genealogy Help by Karly Polen G2G Crew (370 points)
recategorized by Michael Stills

Did not find Kambrick, only Hambrick. 

Hambrick

Recorded as Hambridge, Hambrick, and Hambrook, this is an English locational surname. It originates from either Hambridge, a village in Somerset, Ham Bridge, a village in Sussex, or the four places called Hambrook in the counties of Gloucestershire (twice), Hereford or Sussex. The places as Ham Bridge translate as 'stone bridge' from the pre 7th century Olde English word 'han' meaning stone, and 'brygg', a causeway, or Ham Brook, the stony stream, with Hambrook in Gloucestershire being recorded as 'Hanbroc' in the famous Domesday Book of 1086. The transposition of 'n' to 'm' as in han to ham, is a common feature of early recordings, and may be put down to either poor spelling or thick dialects, or probably both. Locational surnames are by their nature 'from' names. They were names given to people as easy identification, after they left their original homes to move somewhere else. In so doing they took or were given as their surname the name of their former village. In this case the surname in its different forms is well recorded in the diocese of Greater London, the 'mecca' then as now, for those hoping to make their fortune. Examples of the surname recording taken from surviving church registers of the city of London include Anna Hambrooke at St Pauls, Covent Garden, on February 14th 1664, Susan Hambridge at the same church, but on November 8th 1798, and Joseph Hambrick at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney, on Augst 5th 1868.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2016



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Hambrick#ixzz4TQfevn9H

I ran into the same problem, only finding Hambrick. The problem though, is that I cannot find anything more than this. Kambrick is the last name for sure I just need to know more about the roots to know of I'm on the right track or not. Is there anything else you could find maybe?
If Feresa was born in Austria about 1882, I am assuming that her father, Michael, was probably married in Austria before 1882.

4 Answers

+1 vote
 
Best answer
There's a narrow range of years when the name shows at familysearch.org

Feresa Kambrick
United States Census, 1940
birth:
1882
Austria
residence:
1940
Ward 4, Canton City, Canton Township, Stark, Ohio, United States

George Kambrick
United States Census, 1930
birth:
1885
Louisiana
residence:
1930
Camden, Ouachita, Arkansas, United States

Mike Kambrick
United States Census, 1930
birth:
1893
Montana
residence:
1930
Buhl, Twin Falls, Idaho, United States

John D Kambrick
United States Census, 1930
birth:
1887
Montana
residence:
1930
Buhl, Twin Falls, Idaho, United States

Edith A Kambrick
United States Census, 1930
birth:
1894
Idaho
residence:
1930
Buhl, Twin Falls, Idaho, United States

Floyd Kambrick
United States Census, 1920
birth:
1890
Kentucky
residence:
1920
Frankfort Ward 3, Franklin, Kentucky, United States

Mollie Kambrick
United States Census, 1920
birth:
1891
North Carolina
residence:
1920
Frankfort Ward 3, Franklin, Kentucky, United States

Henry Kambrick
United States Census, 1920
birth:
1871
Missouri
residence:
1920
Kansas City Ward 16, Jackson, Missouri, United States

John Kambrick
United States Census, 1910
birth: 1886
Austria
residence:
1910
San Francisco Assembly District 31, San Francisco, California, United States
immigration: 1902

Annie Kambrick
United States Census, 1910
birth:
1892
California
residence:
1910
San Francisco Assembly District 31, San Francisco, California, United States

Jacob Kambrick
United States Census, 1910
birth:
1870
Austria
residence:
1910
Precinct 45, Silver Bow, Montana, United States
immigration: 1885

Joanna Kambrick
United States Census, 1910
birth:
1881
Austria
residence:
1910
Precinct 45, Silver Bow, Montana, United States
immigration: 1898

Samiel Kambrick
United States Census, 1900
birth:
February 1855
Alabama
residence:
1900
Precinct 2 New Market, Madison, Alabama, United States

Ellen Kambrick
United States Census, 1900
birth:
May 1863
Alabama
residence:
1900
Precinct 2 New Market, Madison, Alabama, United States

Adaline Kambrick
United States Census, 1900
birth:
October 1886
Alabama
residence:
1900
Precinct 2 New Market, Madison, Alabama, United States

Lucy Ann Kambrick
United States Census, 1900
birth:
December 1889
Alabama
residence:
1900
Precinct 2 New Market, Madison, Alabama, United States

May Ella Kambrick
United States Census, 1900
birth:
February 1900
Alabama
residence:
1900
Precinct 2 New Market, Madison, Alabama, United States

Samiel Kambrick
United States Census, 1900
birth:
July 1896
Alabama
residence:
1900
Precinct 2 New Market, Madison, Alabama, United States

Anna Kambrick
United States Census, 1870
birth:
from 1813 to 1814
residence:
1870
Pennsylvania, United States

Louis Kambrick
United States Census, 1870
birth:
from 1840 to 1841
Ohio
residence:
1870
Ohio, United States
by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (2.1m points)
selected by Karly Polen
Can you find anything more about Feresa Kambrick? My great grandfather's name was Michael Kambrick, could you possibly help with info on him as well?

Time frame and geographic information might help narrow it down. What state, county and or city; also, what birth year, marriage year and or death year if applicable? Is the following Feresa yours?

 

Feresa Kambrick

United States Census, 1940

Name Feresa Kambrick
Event Type Census
Event Date 1940
Event Place Ward 4, Canton City, Canton Township, Stark, Ohio, United States
Gender Female
Age 58
Marital Status Widowed
Race (Original) White
Race White
Relationship to Head of Household (Original) Head
Relationship to Head of Household Head
Birthplace Austria
Birth Year (Estimated) 1882
Last Place of Residence Same House

Household

Role

Gender

Age

Birthplace

Feresa Kambrick Head F 58 Austria
Milan Kambrick Son M 39 Ohio
William Kambrick Son M 16 Ohio

 

Citing the Record

United States Census, 1940

District 90-51
Family Number 61
Sheet Number and Letter 5A
Line Number 9
Affiliate Publication Number T627
Affiliate Film Number 3184
Digital Folder Number 005460713
Image Number 00395

Citing this Record

"United States Census, 1940," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KWPQ-1JZ : accessed 21 December 2016), Feresa Kambrick, Ward 4, Canton City, Canton Township, Stark, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 90-51, sheet 5A, line 9, family 61, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 - 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 3184.

+1 vote

Few

This very interesting surname is believed to be of English-Welsh medieval origins, but it has said that even that simple statement is clouded with some doubt. It was once claimed that the name was a short form of the surname 'Fewster'. This derives from the pre 10th century, Old French 'fustier', meaning a 'saddle-tree maker', but at best this prognosis seems unlikely. The earliest church recordings show that 'Few', the modern spelling, is a progressive development of 'Fewe', itself from 'Phehewe'- see below. Although we habe no absolutely conclusive evidence, we believe that the original 'Phehew' is a dialectal form of the Welsh 'Ap Hugh' i.e The son of Hugh, which is also recorded as 'Phugh'. In support of these observations we include the following examples of the surname recording commencing with Anne Phehew, the daughter of Robert Phehew, christened at St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, on September 27th 1584, and Dorothie Pehew, who was probably the sister of Anne, christened at the same church on October 26th 1589. Later recordings are those of Joane Fewe who married Alexander Willes at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney, on January 15th 1603, Ana Few, daughter of Edmond Few, christened at the church known as St Botolphs Without, in London, on October 9th 1653. Finally we have Robert Phugh, son of Richard Phugh, christened at St Martins in the Field, Westminster, on March 30th 1685. The coat of arms granted in 1612 has the blazon of a blue field, a silver lion rampant armed and langued in red. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas Phehewe, which was dated July 7th 1582, christened at St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as 'Good Queen Bess', 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2016



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Few#ixzz4TQdzeB66

by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (2.1m points)
+2 votes

Recorded in several spellings including PolenPollen, Pollin, Pawlin, Paulin, Pawling, Poulin and others, this interesting name is English and medieval. It has several possible origins. The first and most usual is as a diminutive from the given name"Paul", itself from the Roman (Latin) name "Paulus", meaning small.

Surname Database: Pollen Last Name Origin

www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Pollen

 

by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (2.1m points)
There are 2 different stories that I heard about the Polen last name. My father always told me that his grandfather came to the US from Germany, but then I was told by (possibly) a distant relative that we are English. The story she told me was of twin brothers, William and Thomas Polen who were born and raised in Virgina, they got into an argument when they were grown and one went to live in Pennsylvania and the other in West Virginia. The twins make sense because my dad is a twin, but he keeps insisting that we are German, I think we're English. Any light shed on this story would be awesome!!! I'm having so much trouble finding anything at all...
If you go back early enough, there were Germanic tribes, such as the Angles and Saxons, who invaded Germany after the Romans left around 400 AD. The Angles spoke Anglish, which later was modified to English. My line traces back to East Anglia, England. Sorry, I don't know the specifics about what country the Polen line traces back to.
+1 vote

That name Kambrick came from the name Cambicek which Stephan,  Teresa's ( Her name is misspelled on the census roster) husband changed when they arrived in the USA from Austria - Hungary. Actually they were not from Austria proper but from what is now Croatia. Austria - Hungary encompassed many countries then. I think they arrived in 1900 because my uncle Milan was only a year old. From what was told to me they first went to Minnesota but it was so cold they hauled ass to Ohio

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+2 votes
1 answer
66 views asked Dec 21, 2016 in The Tree House by Karly Polen G2G Crew (370 points)

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