In the seventeenth-century Electorate of Saxony, what was a Stadtfähnrich?

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The late family genealogist mentions that our ancestor Caspar Friese(https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Friese-88), 1628-84, was a "Stadtfähnrich" in Leipzig. Online resources (e.g., LEO, DRW, Archive.org's Vocabulary of German Military Terms and Abbreviations (1917), etc.; GenWiki's Berufsbezeichnung doesn't have it) describe a "Fähnrich" as a military cadet/lieutenant, or a flag-bearer.

Neither of these seem to fit Caspar's character as an established merchant of some standing. My (frustrated) takeaway is that these meanings suggest that in a large, seventeenth-century city in the Electorate of Saxony, a "Stadtfähnrich" may well have been some kind of head of, or merchant-intermediary with, the city militia.

Something clearer than my feel about this, and some awkward (and possibly anachronistic) definitions... would really establish a better portrait of Caspar. Any good info out there?

WikiTree profile: Caspar Friese
in Genealogy Help by Michael Meurer G2G3 (3.1k points)

1 Answer

+4 votes
The literal translation is something like city ensign.  Since the archaic meaning of ensign is a standard bearer I would think this person was an official in the city govt and likely carried the city banner or flag.  

http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/modern-europe/german-history/holy-roman-empire    In the time period you talk about this was not Germany but the Holy Roman Empire.   So the above is how the govt was laid out...  notice that there are city representatives and that might be what your guy was as they would likely have banners of office and of the city.  Just a guess...
by Laura Bozzay G2G6 Pilot (673k points)

Thank, Laura. Yes; the Electorate of Saxony was a strong and vital chunk of the Holy Roman Empire, and you give a good guess... but it still feels like there's a piece missing, and some questions that could stand be answered; e.g.:

If he was a literal flag-carrier (e.g., for ceremonial occasions), was that the public face (and thus title) of some kind of office with other, further responsibilities?

Would that include military duties, if the correspondence with English "ensign" includes the "infantry officer" aspect? (seen in Merriam-Webster) And if there was a military aspect (such as the city militia) associate with his "Stadtfähnrich" office, did that tie in with the aftereffects of the Thirty Years' War (1618-48), which had seen a pair of decisive battles just outside of Leipzig?

Would the title show that he was in fact the official/recognized provider of flags to the city, since he was a cloth merchant?

Inquiring minds...

Michael if you query out on google or bing there are a number of references to others with the title.   I think you said you read German during earlier emails, I do not.  So I would take a look at some of those other links and see if there is some explanation or if you query in German on Wikipedia for military ranks.  I am not convinced it is related to military because the two dictionary references I looked at had the archaic reference being simply standard bearer and no mention of military. Those appear to be later references.  But, I think if he was just a cloth merchant he would not have that title.  So I think he held some kind of office where he either carries a banner or flag or the office is defined by one who has the flag or banner of the city.  Perhaps someone with more familiarity with Holy Roman Empire militia and city officials would know.  

Try these sources even though it later: :  

18th Century Germany Research Papers - Academia.edu 

www.academia.edu/Documents/in/18th_Century_GermanyAt the time of the Baden peace conference he served as «Stadtfähnrich» and was responsible for the the town's defense in times of war. 

Treaty of Utrecht 1713 Research Papers - Academia.edu 

www.academia.edu/Documents/in/Treaty_of_Utrecht_1713Treaty of Utrecht 1713. 12 Followers. Papers; ... At the time of the Baden peace conference he served as «Stadtfähnrich» and was responsible for the the town's ...

from: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~romban/misc/germanjobs.html#S

Stadtbeamter -municipal official 
Stadtbewohner -inhabitant of a city 
Stadtbote -town messenger; beadle 
Stadtdiener -town worker 
Stadtknecht -town worker 
Stadtrichter -municipal judge 
Stadtschreiber -municipal clerk 
Stadtvogt -town magistrate 

and  Faehnrich -ensign; flagbearer 

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