Should Thomas Richard Fetherston be merged into Thomas Richard Fetherstonhaugh?

+3 votes
101 views

Both Fetherston-24 and Fetherstonhaugh-38 were born in Buckingham, Quebec on 10 August 1832 and both died in Cantley on 28 July 1909.  Fetherton-24's wife was Roxiana A. Landon and Fetherstonhaugh-38's wife was Agnes Churchill.  She could have been the 2nd wife though.  Census data supports Roxiana as wife. 

Children listed under both profiles seem to be the same, except for Reginald John Fetherstonhaugh who was born in 1884, the year that Roxiana died.  I don't see how all the children but one have the same names and birth dates and places under each profile unless they were the same person. 

There was an ancestry.com references to a Cantley, Ontario, but I've not been able to locate such a place.  Cantley, Quebec, does exist.  Moreover, Agnes Churchill's profile lacks source documentation.

So should the two be merged?  Is Fetherston and Fetherstonhaugh a name variation?  The only child of Fetherstonhaugh-38 that has the name Fetherstonhaugh is the last born one  (Reginald). 

WikiTree profile: Thomas Fetherston
in Genealogy Help by David Hughey G2G6 Pilot (919k points)

4 Answers

+1 vote

Last name: Fetherston

Recorded in a variety of spellings including Fetherston, Fetherstone, Featherstone, and reputed to be the longest single surname spelling in England, Fetherstonhaugh and Featherstonhaugh, this is a pre medieval locational surname. It originates either from the castle of Featherstonhaugh in Northumberland, which was, it is claimed in Burkes General Armoury, held by the same Featherstonhaugh family for eight hundred years, or from one of the various places called Featherstone, mainly in the north of England. In every case the place name and hence the surname, derives from the pre 7th century Olde English 'feberstan', a word which describes an ancient grave or cromlech, consisting of three upright stones and a headstone. The place name is first recorded in Staffordshire in the year 996 a.d. as 'Fetherestanhalg', and as 'Fetherstane' in the Domesday Book for Yorkshire in 1086, but perhaps surprisingly, not until 1204 in Northumberland, when it is recorded as 'Fethererestanhalg'. The earliest surname recordings are believed to be from Yorkshire, and include Simon de Fetherstone and Petrus de Fetherstan, (so much for medieval spelling), both appearing in the Poll Tax Rolls for that county in the year 1379. Amongst the famous or interesting nameholders are Richard Fetherston, who was chaplain to Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of King Henry V111 of England. Fetherston protested with great vigour against the kings divorce from Catherine. In 1535 he was beheaded for his courage, and is now regarded as a Catholic martyr. Another to pay with his life was Sir Timothy Fetherstonehaugh, a famous royalist. He played a major part in the English Civil War (1642 - 1652) and was eventually captured at the battle of Wigan in 1651. He was subsequently beheaded for treason on the orders of Oliver Cromwell.

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Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Fetherston#ixzz4aYx7eaK8

by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (2.1m points)
+1 vote
by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (2.1m points)
+1 vote

Hodgson's pedigree

https://books.google.com/books?id=D1IGAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA353

Website

http://www.featherstone.org/

Seems to think a Yorkshire family moved to Northumberland and added the haugh.  That seems very unlikely. 

Basically 3 options

- they were real Fetherstonhaughs

- they adopted that variation as an affectation

- genealogists have given them that name in the belief that it was "correct", and Fetherston was merely an abbreviation.  (Old books sometimes spell the Yorkshire Cholmleys as Cholmondeley, though the long spelling doesn't seem to be found in the sources outside Cheshire until modern times.)

You'll need more primary sources to figure out what's going on. 

 

by RJ Horace G2G6 Pilot (554k points)
0 votes
Yes. Reginald was my great-grandfather. We used Fetherstonhaugh. The haugh part was official, just sometimes census takes dropped it. It is official on his attestation papers for WW1.
by Lee Hayes G2G Rookie (200 points)

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