LNAB Eldridge or Eldredge

+2 votes
66 views
I have been looking at a pending merge for Jonathan Eldridge-898 to be merged with Jonathan Eldredge-194. I have found a baptism for him in 1752 at Groton New London Connecticut under the name of Eldredge, on familysearch and ancestry, but I can't see the original, its just a transcript. It looks like Jonathan used the name Eldridge later in his life. I have looked also at his father (Charles), who will also need to be merged, again with a decision between Eldredge and Eldridge. The father's baptism is under the name Eldridge in 1720 also in Groton, Connecticut. The Eldredge profile is unmanaged. The Eldridge manager hasn't responded to the merge. Any opinions / advice on which name should be used, when completing the merge? Is it best just to go with 'Eldredge' for the son Jonathan born in 1752, and 'Eldridge' for the father Charles born in 1720? Hypothetically if there were conflicting baptism transcripts, would you then go with the name used later in life?
WikiTree profile: Jonathan Eldridge
asked in Policy and Style by Gillian Thomas G2G6 Mach 8 (82.4k points)
retagged by Gillian Thomas

2 Answers

+1 vote
answered by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (1.8m points)
+1 vote

Eldridge

This unusual and interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and has two possible interpretations. Firstly, it may derive from the Old English pre 7th Century personal names "Aelfric" or "Aethelric", both of which survived the influence of Norman names after the Conquest of 1066 in the reduced forms of Alric or Elric, and consequently cannot be distinguished after the 11th Century. The personal names are composed of the elements "aelf" elf, or "aethel", noble, with "ric", ruler, and are recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Aelric, Alric, Alrich and Elric. Secondly, the modern surname, which has a variety of forms, ranging from Aldrich, Aldrick and Al(l)dridge, to Elderidge, Eldridge, Eldredge and Elrick, may be locational in origin, from the place called Aldridge in Staffordshire, or Aldridge Grove in Buckinghamshire, recorded as "Eldrigge" in 1227, The placename derives from the Old English pre 7th Century "alor", alder, and "wic", village, hamlet. The marriage of Roger Eldredge and Elizabeth Miller was recorded at St. James's, Duke's Place, London, on October 8th 1691. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Elrich, which was dated 1279, in the "Ecclesiastical Records of Barnwell", Cambridgeshire, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2017



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Eldridge#ixzz4bxVa8Go8

answered by Frank Gill G2G Astronaut (1.8m points)

Eldredge

This unusual and interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and has two possible interpretations. Firstly, it may derive from the Old English pre 7th Century personal names "Aelfric" or "Aethelric", both of which survived the influence of Norman names after the Conquest of 1066 in the reduced forms of Alric or Elric, and consequently cannot be distinguished after the 11th Century. The personal names are composed of the elements "aelf" elf, or "aethel", noble, with "ric", ruler, and are recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Aelric, Alric, Alrich and Elric. Secondly, the modern surname, which has a variety of forms, ranging from Aldrich, Aldrick and Al(l)dridge, to Elderidge, Eldridge, Eldredge and Elrick, may be locational in origin, from the place called Aldridge in Staffordshire, or Aldridge Grove in Buckinghamshire, recorded as "Eldrigge" in 1227, The placename derives from the Old English pre 7th Century "alor", alder, and "wic", village, hamlet. The marriage of Roger Eldredge and Elizabeth Miller was recorded at St. James's, Duke's Place, London, on October 8th 1691. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Elrich, which was dated 1279, in the "Ecclesiastical Records of Barnwell", Cambridgeshire, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2017



Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Eldredge#ixzz4bxVlaRZ8

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