My name is Kilner Beresford Brasier I am interested in the origins of my christian name Kilner

+1 vote
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I am a direct dscendant of Kilner Brooke Brasier - High Sherriff of County Cork (1793) I can trace a direct line back to Paul Brasier who died 13 April 1683 whos son was Col Hon Kilner Brasier He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Dundalk, County Louth between 1695 and 1697 was Member of Parliament (M.P.) for St. Johnstown, County Donegal between 1703 and 1713. I have been unable to uncover any family or historical references that point to the origins of the name Kilner
in Genealogy Help by
Surnames used as first name usually trace back to female line of a family.  So Kilner could have been the surname of one of your them. IMO

2 Answers

+1 vote

Enter Surname:Kilner   - into any search bar such as google - you will find various derivations/information such as this one below:

"This unusual and interesting name is a variant form of the English occupational surname "Kilner". Originally the word referred to either a potter or one who was in charge of a Kiln. The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th Century word "Cylen(e)" meaning Kiln, itself from the Latin "Culina", kitchen, a derivative of "Coquere", to cook. Early examples of the surname include Robert Kylner of Lincoln in the year 1305, and Johannes Killner of Yorkshire in 1481. In the modern idiom the surname can be spelt in three different ways:- Kilner, Kelner and Killiner. The name development has included Elizabeth Kilynor (1624, London), Alice Killeneer (1682, London), and Mary Killiner who married Henry Hickson on the 23rd February 1764, at St. James, Westminster. The coat of arms has the blazon of a black field, charged with a silver eagle displayed, armed red. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William le Kylnere, which was dated 1292, in the Middle English Surnames of Occupation 1100 - 1350, of Lancashire, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Kilner#ixzz1yWwciSdb

by Chris Hoyt G2G6 Pilot (708k points)
+1 vote
Paul Brasier and John Kilner were joint landowners, so either there was a family relationship or they were close associates, and perhaps Paul chose to honour him by naming his son after him.  If you do a search in a well-known search engine for <"paul brasier" "john kilner"> you will find a number of relevant references, including the 1659 Irish census.

As a related question, do you know how these Brasiers link to the Brasier family of Worcestershire?
by

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