How many generations for the earliest known Y-DNA tested line in WikiTree?

+8 votes
3.7k views
Now that WikiTree can associate a direct paternal line with a Y-DNA result of a descendant of that line, which Y-DNA tested direct paternal line in WikiTree goes back the most number of generations?  How many generations back does that direct paternal line go?
in Policy and Style by Peter Roberts G2G6 Pilot (524k points)

5 Answers

+6 votes
 
Best answer
This is my 18th great-grandfather in my direct paternal line: http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Pierrepont-26
The complete direct paternal line goes back about 30 generations, but I don't think WikiTree has all data yet.
by Rick Pierpont G2G6 Pilot (111k points)
selected by Vincent Piazza
Outstanding.  I hope you will consider Y-DNA testing.  Then finding the most distant Pierpoint cousin possible and having him Y-DNA test to confirm if your direct lines are correct.

 

Sincerely, Peter
Peter, I am not sure I know the correct terminology. I have DNA test results that show over 2,000 SNPs on my Y Chromosome. I assume that is what you mean by a Y-DNA test. These results are from 23andMe.
 
I have been struggling to find my "most distant cousin". Most likely that person has not been DNA tested, so the current DNA features of WikiTree do not help. I wish WikiTree could automatically tell me my most distant cousin along a paternal line without anyone entering DNA information. I don't think a manual search over 30 generations will be practical. 
Hello Rick, I believe 23andMe's Y haplogroup estimate is based on the 2010 ISOGG haplogroup tree at http://www.isogg.org/tree/index10.html
 
To report your Y haplogroup in the recommended fashion, go to the above link and click on your primary Y haplogroup (R, I, E, etc).  Then use your web browser's 'find on this page' function and search for your haplogroup label as reported by 23andMe.  For example if 23andMe says your Y haplogroup is R1b1b2a1a1, then you would click or "R" then search for R1b1b2a1a1.  It shows that in 2010 that M405, S21, and U106 were equivalent SNPs which defined R1b1b2a1a1.  You should report your haplogroup as R-M405/S21/U106  or R-S21 or R-M405 or R-U106.
 
A workaround to get your 23andMe Y-DNA information associated with your direct paternal line in WikiTree is to goto your DNA Tests page and add "other yDNA" test.  Then enter your Y haplogroup (e.g. R-S21) in the haplogroup field [the haplogroup field may not be able to accept a "/"]  Leave the number of markers tested and Ysearch ID blank.  In the note field explain the situation.  For example: "Y haplogroup reported by 23andMe as R1b1b2a1a1 which is haplogroup R-M405/S21/U106 according to the 2010 ISOGG Y haplogroup tree at  http://www.isogg.org/tree/index10.html "
 
Regarding trying to find most distant direct paternal line cousins -- If you use the "Other yDNA" for 23andMe results workaround (explained above) then on your DNA Tests page WikiTree provides a link for "Family members connected through [your] yDNA test."  If WikiTree could tweek that feature a little it should be possible to identify distant direct paternal line cousins who would be most helpful to Y-DNA test to confirm your direct paternal line.
 

 

Peter, Thank you for this information. It works exactly as you describe. I hope other 23andMe people use this method also.
There are important reasons WikiTree does not associate haplogroups reported by 23andMe and Geno2.0 (from National Geographic) with direct line ancestry.  Two people with the same haplogroup might not share the same direct line ancestor in a genealogical timeframe.  Two people with "different" haplogroups might actually share the same terminal SNP(s) but the haplogroup is simply labeled differently.  Some Haplogroup labels are out of date and labeled differently by different labs.

A 25 marker or higher Y chromosome test or full sequence mtDNA test is most useful for comparison and confirming relationships in a genealogical time frame.  Unfortunately many people are not reporting a YSearch or MitoSearch ID or url where results can be viewed for comparison, but they note their haplogroup - which is no more useful than a 23andMe or Geno2.0 haplogroup result in WikiTree.

I highly recommend that 23andMe or Geno2.0 testers take a Y-DNA37 or full sequence mtDNA test and reporting the YSearch and MitoSearch IDs in the testers DNA Tests page in WikiTree.
My main interest is in finding living people that 'should' share my haplogroup. What testing company they used is not important. I don't even care if they have never been tested, but I do want to know who they are. 
 
This method at least gets my name out there to others that should share my haplotype. They will automatically see me, but, unfortunately, I can't see them (I would have to manually search for them). 
 
I would prefer that living people that should share my haplogroup just show up automatically on my profile page as if they had taken a DNA test. I could then contact them and open up a discussion about DNA testing. If we both get tested, we can reaffirm or refute our genealogy, and that is my goal.
+4 votes
I have 9 generations from

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Pinder-55

to

http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Pinder-63

I hope someone has a direct paternal line with many more generations.
by Peter Roberts G2G6 Pilot (524k points)
+5 votes
Well, I can not do a yDNA test, but I am 10 generations (0 is me, 1 is mom, 2 is granddad. . .) from my common yDNA ancestor, Joseph Smith that married Lydia Huit.  Two of the yDNA test participants triangulate from different sons of Joseph and Lydia and they are each 9 generations.  There are yDNA tests from Joseph's brothers, Simon and William, so I guess those guys add one more generation (father of the four Smith brothers).  The trail then gets fuzzy back in England. No genetic proof in the old country.
by Kitty Smith G2G6 Pilot (531k points)
Thanks Kitty.  Please provide a link to the profile of the male Smith tested and a link to his earliest known Smith ancestor's profile.  How many generations?  I expect few can get earlier than the 1500's.
I have Joseph and Simon Smiths in my ancestry in England, East Langton, Leicestershire. have you done the family finder?
I have Joseph smith-500082 and Simon Smith-50029 in my ancestry in England, East Langton, Leicestershire. have you done the family finder?  I believe they are brothers but I can't find any more about them in England and think they might have gone to the US.  I know its a needle in a haystack!

My Joe and Simon (and William and Christopher) came to New England in about 1635, so I don't think you Joe and Simon are the same.

Try these three books for your Leicestershire ancestors: http://archive.org/search.php?query=Leicestershire%20creator%3A%22William%20Phillimore%20Watts%22

+3 votes
Well, how do I answer this one.  My paternal COAT line ancestry is well documented back to COAT-429, but our 67 markers matches with Henry Bennett , Bennet-95.  We believe the match to be somewhere in Somerset / Devon UK.  We have the special DYS393=12, some suggestion that we may have migrated as part of the Roman invasion of  Britian over 2000 years ago.  Looking to find our connection!!
by Veronica Williams G2G6 Pilot (136k points)
I've now finished adding all known yDNA tested descendants of Henry Bennett to Wikitree.  http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Bennet-95.  It goes down 11 generations I think, (if I've counted correctly!) refer to Henrys profile for all 13 y-dna tested descendants in the Bennett line who match back to him.

Still looking for how my ancestor Marmaduke COAT http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cote-429 matches to them too!  The answer clearly lies in England somewhere, we are working on it!!
+5 votes
Peter, Great question!  In my case, my progenitor or Gen 1, Patrick McGuire came from Enniskillen , Co Fermanaugh, Ireland sometime around 1810 (I think)...I am Gen 6 and between us the paper trail and headstone path is solid.

Prior to Patrick, I'm not real certain of names but I am certain of Y DNA. We carry a SNP called L69.5+, a son of L513+ and grandson of L21+.  That genetic path leads back to the first King of Fermanaugh, Donn Carrach Maguire (Mag Uidhir) reigned from 1264 to d-1302.  The Trinity College of Dublin began a Y DNA study in early 2001 that essentially established the Maguire Modal based upon the family testers residing in Co Fermanaugh and Northern Ireland at the time. Further expansion of testing resolution and fidelity as well as surname descendents and sept branching have refined the modal to the Y111 level.

 

That's roughly 24 generations....however, that whole paper trail thing is spotty!
by Brad McGuire G2G2 (2.5k points)

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