Welcome to the Quebecois project

+14 votes
531 views
Hello all, do you have an interest in people born in New France between the start of the colony of Canada (in St-Lawrence valley) and 1763 when France ceded its territory to England?  Then join our project.  To do so, answer this question so a leader can award you the badge, and follow the instructions on this page:
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Project:Quebecois

There are 2 sub-projects also, which may be of interest to you:

The ''Filles du roy'' (daughters of the king): https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Project:Filles_du_Roi

The ''Filles à marier'' (marriageable girls): https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Project:Filles_%C3%A0_marier
asked in Requests for Project Volunteers by Danielle Liard G2G6 Pilot (160k points)
retagged by Isabelle Rassinot
My Great Grandfather spelled his last name Plant, the English Spelling. I was told that he was bilingual. I recently discovered that his father, my G-G-grandfather spelled his last name as Plante, and that he did not use his proper first name of Jacques but went by Joseph and was born in Quebec, son of Ignace Plante.
hi Duane, convert your comment to an answer, and welcome to the project.  Crossing borders indeed does strange things to spellings, yours is mild.  As for the given name, my own grandfather's name was actually Oscar, but he didn't like it so went by Joseph.  Boys had Joseph included among their given names on baptisms during a certain period, as girls had Marie included.  And the very concept of ''middle name'' doesn't exist in French, they are all given names, just so you know.
Thank you Danielle,

Of even more interest to me is the fact that my G-Grandfather would work on his farm in Ontario from snowmelt until the crops where brought in and then head up into northern Quebec and work as a teamster in logging camps, this of course being in the 1920s and 1930s.
oh yes, not unusual, logging was mostly done in winter, no heavy equipment like today, so the trees were brought down either by rivers, floated down, or else on sleds over snow.  Easier than dirt roads that.
Isn't it just amazing how "crossing borders" changes spellings.While this comment does not actually belong in this project, it does provide more evidence for how spelling changes happen. My husband's family name is Petepiece (one of the several variations currently used). His ancestor came to Canada (Lanark County, near Ottawa) from Sligo, Ireland in the 1820s. We were certain this was no Celtic Irish name but the origin was a mystery. We very recently discovered the first ancestor in Ireland was a Huguenot named Henri Richard Petit-Pierre, a Belgium-born Frenchman who was among the Protestants encouraged by England to emmigrate to Ireland in the 1700s in an effort to control and suppress Irish Roman Catholics. He settled in the Sligo area in 1737 and it was his great-grandson who came to Canada in 1829. Within just two generations in Ireland, the name rather quickly evolved from Petit-Pierre to a more 'anglicized' version and distant relatives still residing in Ireland usually spell the name Petipiece. Mystery solved!
My father was Orville Steven Ethier.  His ancestors were all French-Canadian except for a bit of Ojibwe from the Red River in Manitoba.  All settled in the Little Canada - Centerville - Hugo area in Minnesota.

My large tree is on Ancestry.com so if you are on there search for Orville Steven Ethier and you will find it.  I have over a thousand DNA hits on Ancestry.com through my father, but only a few fully-proved through my Irish mother.

I will bring my entire tree to WikiTree when I get the chance.  A bit booked-up just now.

I was in Quebec a few years ago and photographed many pages of text of church records in St Linn thanks to a man named Yves.

I also shot many headstones in the relocated St Linn graveyard and graveyards in St Jacques and St Alexis.  All are on Flickr.
Hi Phil,

you have to be a member of Wikitree to be part of our projects.  If you do transfer your data here, be aware that there are enormous numbers of profiles already present in our shared tree for French Canadians from the New France era, and since we want a single profile for each person, you'll have to check before making duplicates, easy to do searches.
Today I am working on the Coulombe family in our tree and want to learn more by joining and getting this badge.  My husband's family covers the US and Canada so I'm looking for more information.

Hopefully I can contribute something to the information found here.

Sincerely,

Rebecca

Hi Rebecca, convert your comment to an answer on here, and our leader will get you your badge soon.  Please read over the various guidelines on the project page to get you started off right.  laugh

35 Answers

+7 votes
I visited Quebec three times in my adulthood! My in-laws lived there for 10 years. Fond memories of this gorgeous place! Just wanted to say so...
answered by Debbie Parsons G2G6 Pilot (116k points)
We think so too.  :D
+5 votes
I am interested in this project.  My paternal ancestors arrived in Quebec in the 17th century, and then ended up on Upstate New York and Western Massachusetts.  I look forward to participating in the project however possible.

Rick San Soucie
answered by Rick San Soucie G2G5 (5.3k points)
hi Rick, welcome aboard.  Go to the project page listed above to get started, a leader will award you the badge when they see this.  Interesting spelling you have for your name.  More usually seen as Sansoucy or Sans Soucy.  ;)
Thank you for the welcome.  

Yes, the spelling is interesting.  We were always told it was "Americanized" at some point.  

I look forward to assisting any way I can.

Rick San Soucie
Your badge has been awarded, Rick.
Indeed, realize that Sansoucis in all its variations is most certainly a ''dit'' name.  Suggest you go to the project page and read the guidelines on names, both personal and place names, will save you a lot of work to get it right first time around.  :D  And if you need help deciphering records, there are several of us who can assist.
+5 votes

I am interested in this project. My in-laws can be traced back to the early 1700's originating in France, immigrating to Trois-Pistoles, and then branching out to the Montérégie region of Quebec and also into New England.

answered by Evelyn Best G2G Crew (350 points)
Hi Evelyn, welcome, take a look at the project page tagged in the question, has several items to get familiar with, such as guidelines for names of persons and places.  Also instructions on how to get connected with the rest of the members.  A leader will award you your badge soon.
Badge awarded :-)
+6 votes
My ancestor is https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Enaud-7 whose son came to Canada about 1645.
answered by George Chapman G2G Crew (890 points)
hello cousin, welcome to the project.  He's one of my ancestors also.  You'll now find his son who came here at  https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/%C3%89naud-11   I just corrected his last name at birth.  See the project page for guidelines on place and personal names to help you start on the right foot.  And for various other instructions.  The Google group is on a wait list right now, since our leader retired recently.  Another leader will give you your badge.  :D
Badge awarded :D
+5 votes
My grandmother's grandfather was Joseph Matte, descended from Nicolas Matte and Fille du roy Madeleine Auvray.
answered by Pamela Roland G2G Crew (730 points)
Welcome Pamela, I added some data on Nicolas' profile.  A leader will award you your badge soon.
+5 votes
Salut bonjour,

Well, now that I've basically cut my teeth scouring a truck load of records for my French side family, I'd be pleased to extend my efforts toward peeps unrelated or unconnected.
answered by Bruce Codère G2G6 Mach 1 (16.1k points)
lol, hello Bruce, aren't you already a member of the project?
Technically, but I have no badge, sniff sniff... :)
ohhh, poor doll!  ;)  Greg or whoever, can you give Bruce his badge please?
Fret not, I've taken it like a man-doll with 5 o'clock shadow and mismatched socks, manière de parler, disons... :)
Badge awarded-welcome to the project, Bruce!
Thanks Greg. Bien apprecié.
+4 votes
i am looking for ancestors with connections in Quebec to the Vieau family around 1880, some of them ended up in California around 1964....and I love all things Canadian! Would be happy to assist...

Catherine shapiro
answered by Catherine Thielbert G2G Crew (890 points)
Welcome Catherine, the Viau family do have a number already in the tree.  A leader will award you your badge soon.
+4 votes
Based on some extensive background history (thank you nosorigines & the Drouin Collection) I have a LOT of ancestors who are Quebecois.  I'd love to help with this project.
answered by Danielle Leger-Ryan G2G Crew (900 points)

Hi Danielle,  laugh  welcome aboard.  Nos origines is a repository, can be used to unblock things sometimes, but not really as primary source, since it is a collection of trees contributed by members, with variable quality of sources.  Greg will award you your badge soon.

+4 votes
I’m Interested in this project because I researched my son-in-laws Dube ancestors from the present day day back to Mathurin Dube.  My research was done at the French Canadian Historical Society in Belle River Ontario a number of years ago.  I have compared it to the research on this site and have much to add to bring it to the present day and connect it to my grandson.

Thanks,

June Clifford

Clifford-3243

PS I would like the Quebois badge!
answered by June Clifford G2G Crew (900 points)
Hi June, welcome aboard.  A leader will give you your badge soon.
+4 votes
I'm still fairly new to WikiTree, but I'm interested in this project. If my early research is correct, my paternal grandmother's family lived in Acadia, New France.
answered by John Goodwin G2G Crew (330 points)
Hi John, if in Acadie, then your project would be the Acadian one rather than Québécois, 2 different geographic areas, although many Acadians who were deported finished by coming here.  Check it out, let me know if you still want to work on Québécois project as well.

Thank you for the clarification, Danielle. I'm still interested in helping with the Québécois project.

OK, by all means, welcome to the gang.  laugh  A leader will give you your badge soon.

+4 votes

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My DNA results show "Saint Lawrence River French Settlers" which is now Québec. I have found direct lines to family here on Wikitree that have the "Quebecois" tag

 

 

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answered by Jason Maxham G2G1 (1.9k points)

lol, hi Jason, wouldn't put that sort of stuff here on G2G, for one thing only specialists can make sense of it.  wink

Welcome to the project, a leader will award you your badge soon.

oh my gosh, i have no idea why my comment looks like that. haha
+4 votes
From the first french ancestor of my family, Jean Plante to my late father, i want to know the history of my family.

Where they settle, what they do, how many children they had, and make a timeline of all those people that build my own family.

Finaly, i want to make this as a gift for my grandchildren.

Merci!
answered by Sylvain Plante G2G Crew (670 points)
Bonjour Sylvain, bienvenu au projet, notre ''leader'' te donnera ton écusson.
+5 votes
may i join/ get the Quebecois Tag please and thank you, Families include Chouinard, Phaneuf, Ouimmette/Ouimet/Houymet, Duclos, Monty/Monti/Monte' and many others
answered by Arora Anonymous G2G6 Mach 3 (31.8k points)
my godmother & cousins (my moms 2nd cousin) lived in Quebec when i was  a child/teen, my sister and & i took greyhounds in summer to go visit, we romped around Montreal, when i was i think like 12yrs old after taking the bus into the city with our cousins.  Love the city, it is magnificent.

Hi Arora, have to agree, since I live there.  wink  Welcome to the project, a leader will award you your badge soon.

+5 votes

The missing leg of our past is in "French Canada".  My maternal grandmother, Sophie, was a Trombley, born In Crystal Falls MI, to John who was born in Quebec. His Dad was Yesant (sp), and thats all we know of him.

Grandma was a proud French Canadian who said that the Trombley's helped to found the fur trapping industry, which might explain trace native american dna.

answered by Ben Treichel G2G Crew (630 points)
Hi Ben, welcome to the project.  A leader will award you your badge soon.  The name Trombley is more likely to be spelled Tremblay up here.  That given name appears to be distorted, nothing comes to mind as being close to it.
Welcome to the project, Ben.  My best guess is that Yesant Trombley was born Hyacinthe Tremblay.  Perhaps we can find out more once you start adding your ancestors to the tree.

So, I should presume that his surname was modified when he came to Crystal Falls MI. His obit spells the name Tromblay. Census records even worse with the name. I remembered the 'coat of arms' that was made for my grandma by her son Dick. It seems that Yesant is actually Pierre, and John was actually his 17th child. Photos attached.Coat of arms frontCoat of Arms Back

Thanks, remembered a 'family' item that stated his name was Pierre
+4 votes
I have quite a few ancestors born in Quebec before 1763, through my ancestor Augustus LaOrange:         https://www.wikitree.com/treewidget/LaOrange-4/5
answered by Kenneth Kinman G2G6 Mach 4 (41.6k points)
Hi Kenneth, welcome to the project, a leadeer will award you your badge soon.  

Meanwhile, took a look at your ancestor's profile, you've got a bit of work on your plate to correct the last name at birth, it should read Loranger, no such name as LaOrange.
You are correct.  LaOrange was the spelling used once they moved to the United States.  Although a birth record has not been found, the surname would have no doubt been spelled L'Orange (as on his father's birth record).  Therefore, I have changed the LNAB to L'Orange and the Current Last Name is LaOrange (the spelling that he used in the United States, and all his descendants have used ever since).  

               ----------Thanks,   Ken
good show.  I noticed you had a DOB on him.  Can't find that one myself in Drouin, you sure about the date?
His date of birth was given to me by an elderly relative about 40 years ago.  I don't know where he got it.  But it does match the birth date given on findagrave.  I suppose that it might have come from a family Bible, but I have no idea where it might be.  Or perhaps he had also gotten it from an older relative (handed down by word of mouth).
Have a care with Findagrave, when they give you fairly recent tombstone pictures is one thing, but they have become another place to put family trees, with variable sources quality (or lack thereof).
+5 votes

My maternal grandfather was from Quebec, and they seemed to have lived there several generations, the earliest ancestor I can trace at this point was born in 1801. I would like to be part of the project, please.

answered by Mike Hitchcock G2G Crew (630 points)
Hi Mike, welcome to the project.  Our leader will get you your badge soon.
+4 votes
I was born in Montreal and have some idea as to who my ancestors are on my father's side but know very little about my mother's forebears. The ancestor whose last name I have arrived from France in the province of Quebec in the mid to late 1600s and died in 1709. I know only the names of his direct descendants who form the link to my father.
answered by Aimee Langlois G2G Crew (320 points)
Bienvenue parmi nous Aimée.  Lequel des Langlois est votre ancêtre?  Notre leader vous donnera votre écusson bientôt.
Mon ancetre Langlois est Honore Langlois dit Lachapelle. Ma grand-mere maternelle etait aussi une Langlois dont l'ancetre etait Noel Langlois de Bauport pres de Quebec.

ah bon, cousine alors, Honoré est parmi mes ancêtres.  Noël aussi tant qu'à ça.  laugh

+4 votes
My Great Grandfather spelled his last name Plant, the English Spelling. I was told that he was bilingual. I recently discovered that his father, my G-G-grandfather spelled his last name as Plante, and that he did not use his proper first name of Jacques but went by Joseph and was born in Quebec, son of Ignace Plante.

answered by

welcome to the project, our leader will give you your badge soon.  laugh

+4 votes
I just joined WikiTree and much of the focus of my research is in Québec. My family history in the province goes back to Champlain. I'm very interested in joining this group! Thank you.
answered by David Beneteau G2G Crew (770 points)
Welcome David, our leader will give you your badge soon.
+4 votes
Hello! Both of my father's parents have links to Montreal in the 1600s and earlier. My grandfather is a Cousino (also Cousineau) and my grandmother is a Vermette (also Vermet). I'm new to geneology and want to be as accurate as possible with my family tree.
answered by Heidi Cousino G2G Crew (320 points)
hello Heidi, welcome to the project.  Our leader will get you your badge soon.

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