They are in the scientific literature but soon they can’t be on WikiTree?

+13 votes
349 views

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Duldig-2 and https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Ibsen-35 ‘s mtDNA was used to confirm that they found King Richard III.  Sadly it appears they will now be deleted from WikiTree.  I can’t think of a way around that.

in The Tree House by Peter Roberts G2G6 Pilot (483k points)
edited by Peter Roberts
Transfer their bio info to their deceased parents. People who look for them would probably know the names of mom and dad ?
Thank you!
Yes I would do this to, except you can no longer enter DNA information for the parents if they are dead and have no email address.

4 Answers

+6 votes
 
Best answer
I don't care what they say, it is obvious they really did not think this whole thing through...  there is an exception in the law for "news"  I think what you are talking about is something reported in the news which should therefore exempt it...  but keeping track of all of this is the issue...  and I think the fear is driving the pendulum way to far to over reaching protectionism.  Just wait for the lawsuits to start hitting in the world court.  I hear there are going to be a lot of them from the judicial grapevine...  When it becomes too costly to defend all of this it will change.  

https://info.trust-hub.com/blog/will-gdpr-trigger-a-tidal-wave-of-litigation

If all the data firms in the US did a class action suit against the far reaching provisions just think of the amount of money that would be thrown against this new law.  As the reality sets in and the costs to do it become apparent, lawsuits are likely to start and many are predicted to be class action in multiple organizations challenging specific sections that are deemed unenforceable by some in the US tech world.
by Laura Bozzay G2G6 Pilot (565k points)
selected by Lynden Rodriguez
+6 votes
There are a number of articles in the press, including some from the university of Leicester, that can be referenced.
by George Fulton G2G6 Pilot (250k points)
+5 votes
Seems like it ought to be possible to retain DNA information for dead people.
by Ellen Smith G2G Astronaut (1m points)
But the two people whose mitochondrial DNA was used are living.
+9 votes
Unless the subject of the profile is under the age of 13 their profile will not be deleted. They may become unlisted but that only means that only those on the trusted list will be able to see them and their DNA results will be removed. Do they have a wikipedia page? if so you could add the Notables project as a manager and thus make it a little safer that they may have an exception made for them later.
by Dale Byers G2G Astronaut (1.2m points)

They are both named in a Wikipedia page https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exhumation_and_reburial_of_Richard_III_of_England but they don’t each have their own page there.

Then they both should qualify as Notables Peter and that should help a bit in the long run.
How would a living descendant of a notable be classified as a notable.

 

If so then we all are notables, if we can prove descent via DNA. Virtually all persons of European ancestry have a notable ancestor somewhere in the dogpile.

 

I thought notables were the ancesto like Richard III

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