Seeking clarification: Michel Dulac - 1760 France - 1870 Ogdensburg NY.

+5 votes
268 views
Michel Dulac is the keystone to my French Canadian history. I have been able to verify some information back to the 1825 Lower Canada Census.

The family story says he was born 1760 in France and came to Canada, married and had documented children. I've discovered that he appeared in Quebec (St. Bernier area) in 1795 or 6 and married Marguerite (???) from that area in 1801. DULAC DOES NOT APPEAR TO BE A DIT NAME!! It's confusing because there were several Bonhomme dit Dulacs and Aubuchon dit Dulacs in the community as well.

Were "dit" names used in France as well? I have found several church records from Dordogne, Aquitaine, France (near Bordeaux) that are likely him or likely involved him under the same name. It is very likely he was married while still in France. The most promising entry I've found says he was born in Bordeaux in 1780 (year is a miscalculation from census records most likely, Should be 1760).

Published reports say that there was almost no French immigration to Canada during this period. I can only assume he "escaped" at the tail end of the French Revolution and before Napoleon came to power.

If anyone can shed some general light on this, I would be most appreciative. The record is not yet on Wikitree but can be found on familysearch under Michael Dulack; the name he used once he crossed the St Lawrence sometime between 1860 and 1870 when he died at the age of 110.

Record is on family search at https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/LZ2N-127
in Genealogy Help by Douglas Delack G2G Crew (940 points)
retagged by Douglas Delack
Hi Douglas!

I don't have any insight but I will suggest you edit your question to add more tags like "quebecois", "quebec", or "france". There are quite a few people that spring to mind that I am sure could help you with this, these tags will make sure they see your question!

Good luck!!
ADDENDUM:

There was a "Delack" or Dulack or Dulac Farm on the St. Lawrence River in Morristown, NY. The farm was located at what is now "Delack Point." It is now the Jacques Cartier State Park (NY). I visited there with my Dad back in the early 1960's when the original farm house was still there. My Grandfather J. Harold Delack was born there as was his father John Delack (1843). I do not know the history, but the farm was likely started or purchased by Michel Dulac or his son. If my Great Grandfather was born there, it would have had to have existed prior to 1843.

Just a new avenue to work. Thank you for everyone's help.
Thank you. I just went back and fixed what I could. There's a limit of 6 words/surnames in that field unfortunately.
for future reference, ''quebecois'' and ''french roots'' will get the attention of the people who take an interest in such questions.

Meanwhile, took a look at your man, if he was French then his name is Michel, not Michael.  At least at birth.
ADDENDUM 2:

Been trying to find information on the Delack farm at Delack Point in Morristown NY. I found a map from 1865 and find that the house is marked "Mrs. Scofield," the mother of my Great Greatmother who died in 1865. She married my Great Grandfather John Delack who served in the Civil War later in 1865, I believe. So that's how the farm got into this very specific line of the Delack family. It appears that the farm was first started in the Scofield or Traux family in case anyone bumps into the information. Considering it's location on right on the river with a natural cove, it's quite possible it was a trading center in addition to a farm.

There is a wonderful website that houses all sorts of newspaper articles from this area, I wonder if you have seen it, Old Fulton Postcards.

It is searchable, sometimes you have to play around with it a little to get exactly what you are looking for and you can seriously lose some time getting lost reading all the interesting things.

10 Answers

+2 votes
 
Best answer
Regarding the farm, I found an obit in the Watertown NY Daily Standard, May 9, 1925.

Mrs. R. Delack Funeral Held Friday At Bay

Alexandria Bay, May 9 - Mrs. Rosetta Scofield Delack passed away Thursday morning. She was born June 3, 1847, at the Scofield homestead in the town of Morristown, where the greater part of her life was passed. She was married November 1866 to John Delack, who died in 1912. She was the daughter of Margaret Truax and Winfield Scott Scofield. She was a member of the Methodist church.

There survive her one daughter, Mrs. Gertrude M. Houghton of Alexandria Bay; three sons, John H. of Brooklyn, Burton L. of Erie, Pa., and J. Harold of East Orange, N.J,; two sisters, Mrs. Margaret Ackerman of Alexandria Bay and Mrs. Charles W. Griffiths of Ogdensburg.

Services were held at ther (sic) home in Crossmon street, Friday at 3 P.M., Rev. Oliver Raymond and Rev. Paul Malefic officiating.

The body was taken to Schenectady Saturday morning, for interment, where services were held at the grave, the Rev. Dr. Frick, pastor of the First M. E. church in charge.
by Christine Daniels G2G6 Pilot (109k points)
selected by Douglas Delack
Thanks again for the info. I could not find the Watertown NY Daily Standard but I did find the Alexandria Bay paper with the same exact article on Old Fulton Post. FYI, I also found the http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/ site with free indexing and images of many papers. The image quality is quite good.

I cleaned up Rosetta's profile in FS. Maybe when the database reindexes, it will through something else my way. Waiting to hear from the Watertown NY Historian about that property tomorrow. Will let you know what I hear.
FOLLOW UP QUESTION:

I notice you have an interest in the Brockville ON area immediately across the river from Morristown. As you know, I've been attempting to reconcile a 1760 birthday for Michel with a life that doesn't appear to start until he was 30-50 years old. I'm trying to relate this to actual history and geography and I have an interesting theory.

First, I remember being told that Dulac had Hueguenot roots. That would be difficult considering Canada didn't welcome protestants during that period. So, I wondered about a short migration from Colonial America. Wouldn't be far for a Hueguenot family to make the trip to Quebec or Morristown from the Albany area.

I got hold of a map dated 1791 and I see that the entire Canadian shoreline surrounding Brockville says "Loyalists." Apparently, this was a very big area for Colonials loyal to the Crown fled to. This would have covered over a 1760 or 1780 birth date for Michel. I have no coubt he is of French descent, but it would be interesting if you had heard of any Loyalists in your efforts across the river.
Nope, the Loyalists moving to Canada, whether modern-day Ontario or Québec regions, would have done so after US revolution, that's why they are called Loyalists in the first place.  Loyal to the crown.  And highly unlikely anybody from the English colonies would have moved to New France prior to 1760, year of the final conquest of Montréal.  Your man may never have been here at all, if he had Huguenot roots, more likely in the US beforehand ot in Europe somewhere.
I was thinking in the same time period after the Revolution. Would have worked with either a 1760 date or a 1780 date, or later. We also share the same thoughts about arriving in 1760-61. Makes more sense if he was already here in the Colonies and made up a story for some reason.
+5 votes

Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac
Son of Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac and Marie Rainville

Birth 10 May 1818 Sainte-Geneviève-de-Berthier

"Québec, registres paroissiaux catholiques, 1621-1979," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-899Q-39S9-N?cc=1321742&wc=9RLN-GP6%3A24139701%2C24139702%2C25019101 : 16 July 2014), Sainte-Geneviève-de-Berthier > Sainte-Geneviève-de-Berthier > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1807-1823 > image 414 of 665; Archives Nationales du Quebec (National Archives of Quebec), Montreal.

by E Martin G2G6 Mach 7 (74.7k points)
edited by E Martin
Thank you so much for Michel's (JR's) baptismal record. It's an important piece of this puzzle and it's the first time I've seen a credible connection with Aubuchon dit DuLac. Still trying to work out the existence of wife Margaret (???) as opposed to Marie Drinville that shows up on the 1860 US Census.

FYI, I had seen this match before but have been unable to prove the connection.

   Michael Dulack ... in the United States Census, 1860

Line 36 Michael Du Lac age 100 Place of Birth France
Line 37 Margaret age 80 Place of Birth Canada

"United States Census, 1860," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GBSH-C8W?cc=1473181&wc=7Q5P-M31%3A1589422212%2C1589432464%2C1589432528 : 24 March 2017), New York > St Lawrence > 1st Ward Village Ogdensburgh > image 8 of 65; from "1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population," database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

See answer by Danielle Liard

There is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac son of Guillaume and Marguerite Savoie who married Marie Drinville 19 Feb 1810 in St-Cuthbert.  This Michel Dulac died on 5 Nov 1859, buried on the 7th in St-Didace, being given the age of 81.  His wife is named. 

So he cannot be your man.

+5 votes

Census of Canada 1851

Line 45 Michel Dulac age 72 (father)
Line 46 Marie Rainville age 65
Line 47 Michel Dulac age 32 (son)

http://data2.collectionscanada.gc.ca/e/e093/e002316005.jpg

(http://data2.collectionscanada.gc.ca/e/e093/e002316025.jpg)

by E Martin G2G6 Mach 7 (74.7k points)
Thank you for this. I understand that the 1851 Census was actually performed in 1852. That would make Michel born 1780 and not 1760.

Looks like lines 38 to the bottom of the page were extended family in different dwellings. This is very helpful.

I actually have 2 other sheets from 1851 that may or may not show the actual people. Seems they took a rural and a "farm" version and may possibly have double counted some people.

See answer by Danielle Liard

There is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac son of Guillaume and Marguerite Savoie who married Marie Drinville 19 Feb 1810 in St-Cuthbert.  This Michel Dulac died on 5 Nov 1859, buried on the 7th in St-Didace, being given the age of 81.  His wife is named. 

So he cannot be your man.

+4 votes

Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac and Marie Drinville
 
Marriage 19 February 1810  St-Cuthbert

 
"Québec, registres paroissiaux catholiques, 1621-1979," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-899Q-SP8X?cc=1321742&wc=9RLN-92Q%3A19637301%2C19637302%2C19637303 : 16 July 2014), Saint-Cuthbert > Saint-Cuthbert > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1787-1810 > image 700 of 712; Archives Nationales du Quebec (National Archives of Quebec), Montreal.


https://www.nosorigines.qc.ca/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?genealogie=Aubuchon_Michel&pid=170788

by E Martin G2G6 Mach 7 (74.7k points)
edited by E Martin
Thank you for the index and the image of the church record for the marriage. The index appears to be mostly credible, although it still has Michel born 1780 in Berthierville. Not so sure about the marriage record. It appears to be for a Joseph Aubochon dit Dulac and a Marie Genevieve Liret. So many similar names and so informal how they used them compared to today.

Most importantly, I am beginning to seriously question the reported 1760 birthday. Michel would have been 50 at this marriage.

Two marriages on the same page ...
Top : Joseph Aubin & Marie Geneviève Liret
Bottom : Michel Aubuchon & Marie Drinville
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-899Q-SP8X?i=699&wc=9RLN-92Q%3A19637301%2C19637302%2C19637303&cc=1321742

Oh! My bad! Thank you for pointing that out to me.

I see that Marguerite was Acadian and Guillaume from St Berthier. Have to look at this later. So many of the "published" pedigrees are so messed up it's hard to sort them out.

Thanks!

See answer by Danielle Liard

There is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac son of Guillaume and Marguerite Savoie who married Marie Drinville 19 Feb 1810 in St-Cuthbert.  This Michel Dulac died on 5 Nov 1859, buried on the 7th in St-Didace, being given the age of 81.  His wife is named. 

So he cannot be your man.

+4 votes

Michel Aubuchon
Birth  18 October 1780
https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Aubuchon-40

Son of Guillaume Aubuchon and Marguerite Savoie

Family Tree  for Michel Aubuchon
https://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Aubuchon-Family-Tree-40

 

by E Martin G2G6 Mach 7 (74.7k points)
edited by E Martin
Thank you for this. I was aware of this tree but the details vary from the end-of-life story and I've not been able to prove any direct connection so far. I am beginning to question the original assumption that his year of birth was actually 1760 and/or that he was born in France.

See answer by Danielle Liard

There is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac son of Guillaume and Marguerite Savoie who married Marie Drinville 19 Feb 1810 in St-Cuthbert.  This Michel Dulac died on 5 Nov 1859, buried on the 7th in St-Didace, being given the age of 81.  His wife is named. 

So he cannot be your man.

+4 votes
This gives a different view of your information.  It is the death notice in the Ogdensburg Journal published May 25, 1870.  "There died in this city on Monday evening an old man named Michael Dulack whose reported age was 110.  Mr. Dulack was born in Bordeux France.  His parents removed to Quebec, Canada when he was but one year old. If his friends and relatives are not mistaken he arrived in Canada the year succeeding the conquest of Canada by the English.  He removed to this place nearly 50 years ago and has remained uninterrupted through the whole of that long period."   Ogdensburg is in St. Lawrence County, New York State
by Beulah Cramer G2G6 Pilot (297k points)
Thank you so much. This is definitely the Michel/Michael Dulac/Dulack in question. I was able to find the original article based on your information.  It sounds like even the newspaper was respectfully doubtful of his 110 year age. This opens up a slightly new avenue for me to investigate because it looks like he arrived after the English won but before France ceded Quebec to England. I had not been looking there for traces.

The article says that he arrived in Ogdensburg nearly 50 years ago (1820-1830). He and wife Margaret/Marguerite show up as Dulac in 1860 US Census, but I haven't been able to find them in the US before that. I do have strong evidence of them for the 1825 and 1851(2) Canada Census.

Stay tuned!
interesting.  The English conquest is dated as being 1760, but the treaty that ended the war and ceded Canada permanently to the English was in 1763.  There were no French immigrants to the colony during the period 1760-63, so they would have been here either before 1759 when Québec was taken or after 1763.  There was still a state of war until then.
A Michael Dalack was reported in the Journal as missing.  It gave a list
of casualties from the 142nd regiment of the NYV (New York Volunteers?)
following a fierce battle on Sept 30, or so, 1864.   This is probably part of
your family.  I ran all kinds of combinations of spelling of first and last names from 1830-1875 in St. Lawrence and this is all that came up.  It was a hard
fought battle in the Civil War apparently.  7 of 11 commanding officers were
casualties in some manner.  Reported Oct. 1864
The Journal misspelled his name. He is Michael Dulack, Michel Dulac's grandson born 1841. I was just dealing with him last night and found his Civil War record. I knew he was "disabled" but not why.

As far as I can tell, the battle was one of many surrounding the Seige of Richmond. I'd like to find out what happened. His cousin (my Great Grandfather) John Delack also fought with the 16th NY and was apparently shot in the left shoulder and chest.

If you are still looking, note that the family split with some becoming protestant and were named Delack wnile the Catholics continued to call themselves Dulack.
I see your point but I'm not closing my mind to possible scheming especially during such times of civil strife. After all, if he was motivated, he could easily have snuck into Canada through New England or New York.
I was only looking for any more articles about any Dulacks.  There were no other articles.  That was a report in the paper of all of the injuries reported
so people back home knew who had been injured.  There was a list of men and where they were shot, etc.  and that Michael was reported missing.  He
apparently survived the war.  Just thought it would save you looking for more.  It sounds like you have more family sources to help you.
+3 votes
Hi,

Have you already found his marriage record ? What does it say ? It's a key record because you need the names of his parents to look for his baptism certificate in France. There were several DULAC families in Bordeaux and many more in Aquitaine.

http://www.genealogie-gironde.org/actes/chercher.php?achercher=dulac&zone=1&prenom=&comp=D&achercher2=&zone2=&prenom2=&comp2=&achercher3=&zone3=&comp3=&TypN=N&TypD=D&TypM=M&TypV=V&typdivers=&ComDep=%2A%2A%2A&amin=&amax=&pg=2

Unfortunately, the records of Bordeaux before the French Revolution aren't online yet.
by D Q G2G6 Mach 6 (68.8k points)
Thanks for your response.

I have found many marriage records but none of them agree with his wife Margaret/Marguerite as she appeared on the 1860 US Census. I believe I have found evidence of both Michel/Marguerite in Canada in 1825 and 1851. See the article from the Ogdensburg Journal posted just before your response.

I found numerous cryptic Church Records from Dordogne, Aquitaine listing Michel Dulac's is various capacities but there is very little information and the handwriting is very bad.

With your information on Bordeaux and some new hints, I have some new avenues to look at. Thanks for your help!
Don't lose too much time looking for a Michel DULAC in Aquitaine. First, you will find plenty of them and second, there is no way to know if you got the right one.

You mention children born in Canada. I think that you should focus on finding their birth records. Michael DULAC circa 1815 and Louis DULAC circa 1816. The next child you name is Joseph born in 1826. Almost ten years without a birth in a French Canadian Catholic family, even with an aging father, it seems quite unusual.
+3 votes
hi,  Dulac can also have the name Desaliers associated with it.  Don't know what St-Bernier area is, doesn't come up in records search by that name.

I have found more than one choice for a marriage for him:

There is  Michel Dulac, minor son of Marie Julienne Cloutier residing in L'Ange-Gardien (no father named) who married Marie Madeleine Rodrigue, widow of Pierre Roussin, on 17 Nov 1801 in Beauport.  A later marriage of one of their children gives him the name Bonhomme dit Dulac.  He is living but his wife is dead, may have remarried, haven't chased further.

There is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac son of Guillaume and Marguerite Savoie who married Marie Drinville 19 Feb 1810 in St-Cuthbert.  This Michel Dulac died on 5 Nov 1859, buried on the 7th in St-Didace, being given the age of 81.  His wife is named.  So he cannot be your man.

Beware ages given on funeral and census records, census takers didn't necessarily always ask the people their ages but put an estimate down based on appearance; same for funeral records, even more so.  Have seen people tagged as 100 when we knew their actual birth and the 100 was way off, by 10 to 20 years often.  

And yes, dit names were also used in France.  That's where they come from in the first place ;)
by Danielle Liard G2G6 Pilot (388k points)
Thanks. I'm aware of both of those matches, but like you, I have not been able to prove or disprove any connection. I am paying extra attention to the second Guilaume record. If even part of that is true, my Michel didn't arrive from France directly but seems to be associated with original French settlers. That tree seems to open back up prior to 1760.
Just chased down some more records, Michel son of Marie Julienne Cloutier was born and baptized on 30 Sept 1781 in St-Joseph-de-Beauce, he was illegitimate, of unknown father, Joseph Bonhomme dit Dulac was already deceased (in 1778).  So he used the dit name Dulac as his name when he married and got recorded with Bonhomme dit Dulac on his child's marriage.  :D   Which explains why no father is named on his marriage record.

this Michel, widower of Marie Rodrigue, remarried on 24 Apr 1815 with Louise Claise/Claisse/Clesse in Québec (ND),  A few children born to them in Québec city, they disappear after 1822.
The only marriage I can find for a Michel Dulac married to a Marguerite anything was in 1755 in Berthier-en-Haut (Marguerite Charron) , and that Michel was widower of Marie Catherine Dutault, whom he had married in 1728.  Not likely at all.  That Michel went by all 3 names Dulac, Aubuchon and Desaliers.  :D
It's difficult to understand today how important legitimate birth was; especially to a Catholic society. Could easily explain his possible tall tale of birth in France in 1760. He could easily hijack a new name ane dit name (or several) to hide behind. Just thinking out loud.

Thanks again.
actually, not entirely sure about the importance of legitimacy back then.  A woman bearing a child out of wedlock was definitely censured, but since there were actually very few women here in proportion to men, they still got married.  And many men adopted any offspring of such women.  If nothing else, proved she wasn't barren.  :D   My own direct paternal ancestor who came here from France was born out of wedlock, his parents married the following year if I remember my dates correctly.  Still wound up being an important man here.  And very often if the woman named the father the man was obligated to provide for the child.  I've seen a few cases where the father is not named at all, and then the child took either the adoptive parent name, or in one case I recall he took the given name of his adoptive father as his last name.

There was not the fixation on names back then outside nobility as there is now, witness how many people took dit names.  Often that was only done to differentiate family lines, since given names weren't particularly varied.  So first cousins would easily have the same name.

Maybe if you could find his wife's funeral that could give you more of a lead.
+1 vote

See comment  by David Queneherve ...

You mention children born in Canada. I think that you should focus on finding their birth records. Michael DULAC circa 1815 and Louis DULAC circa 1816.

...

Michel 1818-01-03
son of Michel Dulac and Louise Clesse

"Québec, registres paroissiaux catholiques, 1621-1979," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L993-FPHF?cc=1321742&wc=9RLX-SPD%3A17585101%2C19508101%2C28605401 : 16 July 2014), Québec > Notre-Dame-de-Québec > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1818-1819 > image 7 of 422; Archives Nationales du Quebec (National Archives of Quebec), Montreal.

...

Louis 1816-01-21
Son of Michel Bonhomme and Louise Claisse

"Québec, registres paroissiaux catholiques, 1621-1979," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L993-NC5J?cc=1321742&wc=9RLX-K6X%3A17585101%2C19508101%2C28181303 : 16 July 2014), Québec > Notre-Dame-de-Québec > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1814-1817 > image 333 of 691; Archives Nationales du Quebec (National Archives of Quebec), Montreal.

...

See also comment by Danielle Liard ...

this Michel, widower of Marie Rodrigue, remarried on 24 Apr 1815 with Louise Claise/Claisse/Clesse in Québec (ND),  A few children born to them in Québec city, they disappear after 1822.

...

About  Michel Dulac

1) Marriage 1801-11-17 Beauport with MARIE MADELEINE RODRIGUE (b 1762-10-03 - d 1813-11-15)

Children
Marie Dulac 1803-03-27 m 1816 Jacques Morin
Rosalie Dulac 1804-05-21 m 1821-11-13 Athanase Lavoie
Françoise Bonhomme Dulac 1807-10-02 death 1811-08-03

2) Marriage 1815-04-24 Québec (Notre-Dame-de-Québec) with LOUISE CLESSE

Children
Louis 1816-01-21
Michel 1818-01-03
Jean Baptiste 1820-01-04
Marie Louise 1822-04-03 death 1822-08-05

https://www.prdh-igd.com/Membership/fr/PRDH/Individu/578956

https://www.prdh-igd.com/Gratuit/fr/PRDH/Liste/Couple?nh=dulac&rsh=OU&sh=bonhomme&ph=michel&nf=rodrigue&r=True&pg=1

https://www.prdh-igd.com/Gratuit/fr/PRDH/Liste/Couple?nh=dulac&rsh=OU&sh=bonhomme&nf=clesse&r=True&pg=1

...

But I can not find any document to link
   Michael Dulack (abt. 1760 - 1870)
 
to
   Michael Dulack (1816 - 1891)

by E Martin G2G6 Mach 7 (74.7k points)
edited by E Martin
This is all valuable information. I appears that many of my precedessors have made too many assumptions over the years and the records are scrambled.

The "death notice" posted above for 1870 says that MichelMichael "removed to Ogdensburgh almost 50 years earlier. If that's true, he was likely itinerant chasing farm work in summer and logging work in other seasons.

I need to go back and reopen some of the hard copy information and read it again.

I also found this ...

 

United States Census, 1830

Mitchell Dulack
Males of 5 and under 10 ... 1
Males of 10 and under 15 ... 2
Males of 40 and under 50 ... 1
Females  under 5 years of age ... 1
Females  of 20 and under 30 ... 1
 
 
"United States Census, 1830," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YYY-S65?cc=1803958&wc=35YH-K61%3A1588472203%2C1588474402%2C1588474403 : 14 August 2015), New York > Saint Lawrence > Oswegatchie > image 17 of 60; citing NARA microfilm publication M19, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

See also ...

United States Census, 1840
 
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYYJ-19X?cc=1786457
   
"United States Census, 1840," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHTH-MX1 : 16 August 2017), Lewis Delae, Ogdensburg, St Lawrence, New York, United States; citing p. 27, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 334; FHL microfilm 17,204.
   
"United States Census, 1840," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHTH-MXH : 16 August 2017), M Delae, Ogdensburg, St Lawrence, New York, United States; citing p. 27, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 334; FHL microfilm 17,204.

  

+1 vote

Review

About comment  by Douglas Delack ...

The article says that he arrived in Ogdensburg nearly 50 years ago (1820-1830). He and wife Margaret/Marguerite show up as Dulac in 1860 US Census, but I haven't been able to find them in the US before that. I do have strong evidence of them for the 1825 and 1851(2) Canada Census.
  
  
(1) This is the The Ogdensburg journal. (Ogdensburg, N.Y.) 1868-1916, May 25, 1870, Page 3, Image 3

http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn85054113/1870-05-25/ed-1/seq-3/print/image_681x461_from_1891%2C2657_to_2990%2C3402/

  

(2) This is  ...
Line 36 Michael Du Lac age 100 Place of Birth France
Line 37 Margaret age 80 Place of Birth Canada

 "United States Census, 1860," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GBSH-C8W?cc=1473181&wc=7Q5P-M31%3A1589422212%2C1589432464%2C1589432528 : 24 March 2017), New York > St Lawrence > 1st Ward Village Ogdensburgh > image 8 of 65; from "1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population," database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). 

  

(3) I have found  ...  
Line 21 Michael  age 90
Line 22 Margaret  age 80
Line 23 Alexander 

"United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6QDQ-WXK?cc=1401638&wc=95RW-7MQ%3A1031313801%2C1035210501%2C1035230401 : 9 April 2016), New York > St. Lawrence > Oswegatchie > image 113 of 192; citing NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

"United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC16-2GZ : 12 April 2016), Michael Durae, Oswegatchie, St. Lawrence, New York, United States; citing family 548, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

  

(4) About the Canada Census 1851(1852) :

http://data2.collectionscanada.gc.ca/e/e093/e002316005.jpg

This is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac (1780 - 1859) and his wife Marie Rainville (Lines 45-46)

  

(5) Canada, Lower Canada Census, 1825
 
Michel Dulac ... Total of 8 in the family ... St. Cuthbert, Warwick

I think it is Michel Aubuchon dit Dulac who married Marie Drinville 19 Feb 1810 in St-Cuthbert
 
http://data2.collectionscanada.gc.ca/1825/jpg/004569588_00299.jpg

"Canada, recensement du Bas-Canada, 1825," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:939D-VDSD-L?cc=1834346&wc=M6P1-W6B%3A162681501%2C162680202 : 21 May 2014), Warwick > Berthier > image 8 of 8; Public Archives, Ottawa, Ontario.

"Canada, recensement du Bas-Canada, 1825," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KHJD-7L4 : 8 November 2014), Michel Dulac, St. Cuthbert, Warwick, Quebec, Canada; citing p. 1522 1523, volume 3, MG 31 C1; Library and Archives Canada microfilm number C-718, Public Archives, Ottawa, Ontario; FHL microfilm 2,443,958.

by E Martin G2G6 Mach 7 (74.7k points)
edited by E Martin
Thank You! I'm overwhelmed by all the information. I feel that the connections back through 1830 seem credible. Beyond that point, it seems like there are too many choices. I need to do some sorting.

Interesting that Michel seems to be holding to the 1760 birthdate even with all the found records that would point to 1780ish. Also interesting that everything post 1830 makes use of Dulac as a dit name.

On the plus side, in 1840, it seems Michel was single. the Margaret I was looking for showed up on the 1850 (it seems) and 1860 census, so I'm guessing I can stop searching for her earlier.
Hi Douglas

... reading all the posts ... Great work !

You may get answers for your quest using y-DNA.

I am sharing my experience below and I think that it might be helpful in the search of your ancestor. At least, it could give you directions where to not search.

The main ancestor of the Dulac in North-America was Nicolas Bonhomme dit Dulac (1665-1711), m . Marie-Louise Cloutier; this Nicolas Bonhomme was the grand-son of frenchman Nicolas Bonhomme, m. Catherine Gouget that came in New-France in 1640 or before.

About the two Nicolas :

Nicolas Bonhomme, m. Catherine Gouget : http://www.francogene.com/genealogie-quebec-genealogy/000/000138.php

Nicolas Bonhomme dit Dulac, m. Marie-Louise Cloutier : http://www.francogene.com/genealogie-quebec-genealogy/006/006202.php

I have done Y-DNA tests : the BigY and Y-STR111 at Ftdna (https://www.familytreedna.com/). I was able to make triangulation with other descendants of Nicolas Bonhomme, m. Catherine Gouget.

See triangulation :

http://www.francogene.com/triangulation/TRI0218.php

The Y-STR37 test could tell that two descendants (me and Gary) share the same Y Ancestor at the 10th-11th generation : Nicolas Bonhomme, m. Catherine Gouget.

So if you are a Dulac descendant of Nicolas Bonhomme, your Y-DNA would match with mine.

For more details, see https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/frenchheritage/dna-results

Click on ColorizedChart and search Bonhomme. ... be patient, their server is quite slow ...

The Aubuchon surname is not listed yet though.

If the results of your Y-DNA reveal that we share the same Y-STR markers, then we will know right away that we are descendants of Nicolas Bonhomme (m.Catherine Gouget). If we do not share the same markers, then it would mean that you are a descendant of another person. And maybe this person has already descendants with Y-DNA found in the FTDNA database.

As mentioned above, Michel Dulac, born 1818-01-03 Notre-Dame-de-Québec (PRDH #125826), looks like a good link to your Michel. His parents were Michel Dulac and Louise Clesse. Michel Dulac, m. Louise Clesse was an illegimate son born in 1778 (mother is Marie-Julienne Cloutier). Using Y-DNA test, you might be able to "connect" with known ancestor. At the time of Marie-Julienne Cloutier, not a lot of people were living in the Beauce area and some of them have their Y-DNA already identified.

You can buy YDNA-37 Tests at FTDNA. See :

https://www.familytreedna.com/products/y-dna

https://www.familytreedna.com/products/y-dna#/compare

Ancestry DNA is very interesting but the tests are autosomal tests. With Ancestry tests, you cannot identify male ancestry using only Y chromosome.

Have fun !

Jean Bonhomme

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