What was a LASH Maker in 1861?

+5 votes
166 views
I have a young man born in Exeter, Devon, England in 1837, who seems to be in Northampstonshire in the 1861 census.

His occupation is listed as a LASH MAKER,

What was a lash maker?

Is this a misprint for LACE maker - although that was usually a females job.

Thank you.

Robynne Lozier
WikiTree profile: John Voisey
in Genealogy Help by Robynne Lozier G2G6 Pilot (930k points)
reopened by Robynne Lozier
and, by the way - lacemaking was very much a male AND female occupation.
The strips of leather in lashes are also called laces.  Coincidence?
I actually think it is last maker. Northamptonshire was a centre for footwear manufacture and lasts were an essential tool in the making of boots and shoes.
I agree with Gillian. The image isn't clear though.Since John's surname seems to vary from census to census ,I looked for Henry Wiggins b 1833 St George in the East (also a boarder and 'lash' maker in the same house. ) In 1871, he was in Birkenhead  and quite clearly a last maker.
I can't see the document, but I have to admit 'last' makes sense given the context provided in the other comments.  Thank goodness we can post to 'closed' threads!

1 Answer

+8 votes
 
Best answer
'Lash' is a synonym for whip.
by Herbert Tardy G2G6 Pilot (634k points)
selected by Steve McCabe
So that begs the question, who would be using whips in the 1860s?
Well, there were still horses and carriages for 40 more years, and whips/lashes came in all sizes.
Cattlemen, buggy drivers, horse trainers, etc.
DUH - silly me. Of course. Thanks Guys.

People still make them.  cool

https://youtu.be/ZhghkpYYxDk

A 3 second video? LOL

Thanks for the star, Steve!  smiley

I'm not convinced that there were tradesmen who specialized in making lashes. Wouldn't they have been made by the same people who made other leather goods for horses, such as bridles, harnesses and saddles? I think more research is needed. It may well have been "last" after all, unless we can come up with some confirmed examples of "lash makers."

I just looked at the entry in question, and the supposed "lash makers" are surrounded (both on his own page and those before and after) by shoemakers and clickers (who made parts of shoes). So last maker would make much more sense.
OK reopening the question so you can discuss the lash versus last problem.

What exactly was a last in relation to shoes?

Thank you.
It's the foot-shaped wooden mold thing.
The foot shaped wooden mold thingy...  Thanks for the giggles, Herbert.

I haven't seen the image of the 1861 census records, but all 3 men in the household, (for John Voysey - see the link above) were listed as LASH makers in the Family Ssearch transcription.

The H key on a keyboard is not that far from the T key. I guess LASH could have been a mispelling once - but 3 times - really?

In 1851 Ancestry transcribes his profession as "last maker's apprentice" and he is living next door to a carpenter (probably his master in the apprenticeship). His brother has the same occupation. (I think the transcription errors are more likely due to the handwriting than sloppy keyboarding).

First name(s) John
Last name Veysey
Relationship Nephew
Marital status Unmarried
Sex Male
Age 15
Birth year 1836
Occupation Last Maker's Apprentice
And to think I ignored that occupation in the 1851 record for James, because I didn't have a clue what a Last Maker was.

James later went on to join the Royal Navy.

Thanks for the Ancestry record.
Have amended John's profile to correct his occupation.

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