Nova Scotia Monthly - July 2018

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Hear ye, hear ye! If you are interested in Nova Scotia, and the people who made it what it is today, then the Nova Scotia Project might be for you!

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics

Nova Scotia is one of my favourite jurisdictions to work in, and the Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics site is a big reason why: it's free (although you can buy copies of records if you like), you don't have to sign up for it, and, with some exceptions, it lists people who were born (from 1864 to 1877, 1908 to 1917, and delayed registrations from 1830 to 1917), married (from 1763 to 1942), or died in Nova Scotia (from 1864 to 1877, 1908 to 1967, or within the City of Halifax from 1890 to 1908). 

Recently, I've been working through the Nova Scotia Unsourced Profiles category, and sourcing those profiles I could using the Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics site. I have been able to make a dent, but there are enough profiles listed in that category that it would probably take a bunch of WikiTreers months to empty that category. In the meantime, it's one way to rack up points in the Sourcerers Challenge.

Currently, I'm going through my watchlist, looking for family members from Nova Scotia, and making sure that I have them sourced as completely as possible from the Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics site. (And, incidentally, making sure that I put in death dates where I can find them, to get my deceased family members born from 1928 or later out of the "Unlisted" privacy level.)

Unconnected Premiers of Nova Scotia

(This isn't the full list, just the first 10. I didn't want to overwhelm anybody.)

asked in The Tree House by Greg Slade G2G6 Pilot (146k points)
edited by Greg Slade

Thanks for this Greg!  

I agree, NS Vital Statistics is a great site, user-friendly and very comprehensive records for the period it covers.  

For the period before vital records were required in Nova Scotia, the newspapers and other sources such as family bibles, cemetery and church records also provide rich information. To help other researchers find this information, various members of the Nova Scotia Project have added our sources to the bottom part of the project page.  

Have found a lot of good information on the NS Vital Statistics site.  Would like to know the proper format for citations to it.

Different people use different formats, I don't think there's one right way.  

Speaking for myself, I spent a little time looking at the approaches others used, then trying out this and that. My laziness is reflected in my own preferred style - which involves 4 steps:   

1. copy and paste this template into the profile <ref>[url Nova Scotia Vital Records] showing txt</ref>

2. replace the placeholder "url" with the web address (copy and paste)

3.  replace the placeholder "txt" with the text above the visual

4. I usually remove the paragraph break before "Item", so it all goes on one line. 

The last one I added looks like this in the bio: 

  <ref>[https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/ItemView.aspx?ImageFile=1810-89&Event=marriage&ID=29824 Nova Scotia Vital Records] showing Annie L. Wood and Charles R. Hobin married 1892 in Cumberland County Item can be found in Registration Year: 1892 - Book: 1810 - Page: 89 - Number: 72</ref>

and my end result looks like this: 

Nova Scotia Vital Records showing Annie L. Wood and Charles R. Hobin married 1892 in Cumberland County Item can be found in Registration Year: 1892 - Book: 1810 - Page: 89 - Number: 72

I'll be interested to see what you settle on! 

That's pretty close to what I do. 

In my case, the code looks like this:

William died in Windsor on August 7, 1909<ref>[https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/ItemView.aspx?ImageFile=10-44&Event=death&ID=74642 Death registration for William Henry Blanchard,] Registration Year: 1909, Book: 10, Page: 44, Number: 261, Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics.</ref>. On his death registration, William's occupation was listed as "Barrister-at-Law."

and the result looks like this:

William died in Windsor on August 7, 1909[2]. On his death registration, William's occupation was listed as "Barrister-at-Law."

Death registration for William Henry Blanchard, Registration Year: 1909, Book: 10, Page: 44, Number: 261, Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics.

I have a similar template to yours, Greg. Wonderful job on these monthly updates, btw.
This question does remind me, though, of something that's been in the back of my mind for months. What I'd like to see is a page (probably in the help section), with examples of how to format "proper", EE-format sources out of sites like this. There are lots of pointers all over the site telling people to use EE format, but they all eventually dead-end by pointing to the book. I think it would be a lot more helpful to people to take examples from the Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics site, the various databases on the Library and Archives Canada site (census results, passenger lists, and so on), etc., etc., and show people how to reformat the information they see on each site into an "approved" source format.
Interesting thought Greg!  

First, I'm not sure I'm interested in a discussion about the one proper way to use NSHVS, or LAC,

Second, I'm not sure the Nova Scotia problem is new users.  Personally, I'm sourcing large numbers of old existing profiles that were created when WikiTree was new and/or by users who didn't have the computer skills - I've chatted with some of them, distant relatives.  New users seem to be overly concerned with doing it right!

On the other hand, I have appreciated the source information that is already found on free space pages like this one:  https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Space:Freeman_Genealogy_in_Three_Parts

This one is categorized simply "Sources".  If it was to be categorized with places like "New England", "Nova Scotia", then it might affect other projects, which is why I think I included a link to it in the NS project page.

There's no reason why you couldn't  prepare something like this for the sources you have in mind.  I'm sure it would be appreciated!

Just thinking at my keyboard.
I absolutely love the idea of a sources and templates page to go along with a project. I haven't done it yet, but once I've done fixing up the Newfoundland Categories, I'm going to do a whole "Newfoundland Sources and Resources" page linked to the project page, with example templates for a variety of sources (including oral family sources!). Similar to the page Laurie linked to.

Laurie, 

I don't think sourcing is just an issue for new users. When I first joined WikiTree, I just put up the family members I knew about. I'm not sure that I had ever even heard the term "sources" in the context of genealogy. Then, I started reading a bunch of stuff about sources being important, and that dictum that says, "Genealogy without sources is mythology." To be honest, that really stuck in my craw. I know who my grandparents are, and ain't nobody can tell me different. 

(Then, too, it brought up bad memories of math class in school, when I would get marked down, not because my answer was wrong, but because I didn't show my work. I'd just work it out in my head, but my teachers wanted me to write down every step of the process, which would take way longer than finding the answer, so that annoyed me, too.)

But eventually, I calmed down somewhat, and realised that, while people might overstate the case, they do have a point. I know what's in my head, but nobody else does, and if we're going to be able to work together on building one world family tree (which is, after all, what we're trying to do), then I need to share, not just bare facts, but how I came to learn those facts. (Well, not just me, everybody.)

So then, I had to go back to all the profiles I had already created, and source them. (Okay, true confessions time: I still haven't finished that part.)

And then I read that sources need to be formatted in a particular style. There's a help page about that, but it only has eight examples: "Book", "Periodical", "Census", "Web page", "Family bible", "Cemetery headstone", "Second-hand information", and "First-hand information (yourself)".

(And, to be honest, I have problems with the examples given: not just that there aren't enough of them [because I have referenced all kinds of things that those examples don't cover], but also because several of them have problems even for the cases they do cover.)

Now, at the bottom of the page, it links to:

Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co.; 3rd edition (May 22, 2015). See also the author's blog by the same name: Evidence Explained.

but to be honest, I haven't shelled out the money for the book, and, however great it may be, I'm not sure that all that many other people would, either. (Professional genealogists, sure. Even keener amateur genealogists. But for dilettantes like me, shelling out over $70 for a hardcover book is just a wee bit more commitment than many people are willing to make.)

So essentially, what I'd like to see is more (and better) material on that page. Although as the list grows to cover more sources, we'd probably have to spawn sub-pages for different cases.

I'm sure that most (if not all) projects have lists of resources, and that's good, but I'm pretty sure that we don't want to have sourcing style guides at the project level, or else we'd have one project telling people to do sources one way, and a different project telling people to do sources a different way. Since Evidence Explained is the "official" style for sourcing, then we should have some document applying to the whole site that explains how that style works in different cases. 

Ah. I forgot to include a news item that came up in my RSS feeds:

Thank you to Laurie, Greg and Brad for the sample footnote templates.  They were really helpful.  Most of the other templates I use have the url link to see the document image at the end of the citation, so here’s the format I wound up using:

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Records, database with images, Nova Scotia Archives (https://www..com), Registration Year: ### - Page: ### - Number: ###, (imagetitle).[imageurl]

Looks like.:

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Records, database with images, Nova Scotia Archives, (https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com), Registration Year: 1917 - Page: 140 - Number: 843, (James Mark Anderson, died December 19, 1917).[7] 

This is just a personal style thing, but I like to put the image title inside the square brackets following the url (leave a space between the end of the url and the beginning of the text), so you don't just get a number, you get something that tells you what you're clicking on:

<ref>Nova Scotia Historical Vital Records [www.uglyurl.com Bertha Thomas and Thomas Richie married 1894 in Halifax County],  Registration Year: 1894 - Book: 1819 - Page: 1 - Number: 12. Accessed 2018</ref>

Ends up looking more like:

Nova Scotia Historical and Vital Statistics. Bertha Thomas and Thomas Ritchie married 1894 in Halifax County. Registration Year: 1894 - Book: 1819 - Page: 1 - Number: 12. Accessed 2018.

Glad you found a solution, GR Gordon!  Happy sourcing smiley

Excellent comment, Brad — I just tweaked the very end to make the link to the inage say “Image”:

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Records, database with images, Nova Scotia Archives (https://www..com), Registration Year: ### - Page: ### - Number: ###, (imagetitle).[imageurl (Image)]

Looks like:

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Records, database with images, Nova Scotia Archives, (https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com), Registration Year: 1917 - Page: 140 - Number: 843, (James Mark Anderson, died December 19, 1917). (Image) 

Ah. I think I should probably have mentioned that there are a ton of profiles listed in the Nova Scotia Unsourced Profiles category. Currently, 425. I've been chipping away at them using the using information I've been able to find on the Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics site, but there are still scads of them to do.

1 Answer

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I proposed a merge for two entries for Edgar nelson Rhodes.  His wife Mary (or Mabel) Grace Pipes is my 3rd cousin, and I will add more sources after the merge is completed.

joe
answered by Joe Patterson G2G6 (9k points)
edited by Joe Patterson
Kewl!

I've built out a little more around Edgar and Mary. It turns out that Edgar's father was notable in his own right. I added him to the Nova Scotia Business Figures category.

I added a few sources and a timeline, Mary Grace Pipes ancestors are all interesting and soon connect to the Ripley family which covers most of Cumberland Co.

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