Same person listed in two different places in 1910 Census

+5 votes
84 views

Theodore Cresswell was born about 1906 in redwood Falls Minnisota to Peter McKay and Elizabeth Smith.  She died shortly after. He remarried pretty soon after that.  The baby died in 1910 in Argyle, Illinois, where his mother had a lot of family.  There were other young children and he remarried quickly so odd they would send the baby off.  So Creswell (what they called him shows up in 1910 Illinois Census in home of brother and sister of his mother

"United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MKF6-Q7Z : accessed 11 July 2018), Creswell Mchay in household of Hugh Smith, Harlem, Winnebago, Illinois, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 144, sheet 10A, family 92, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 336; FHL microfilm 1,374,349.

He also shows up in 1910 in the household of his father and stepmother

"United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M2G1-SJH : accessed 11 July 2018), Creswell Mckay in household of Peter Mckay, Kintire, Redwood, Minnesota, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 114, sheet 2A, family 21, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 713; FHL microfilm 1,374,726.

My guess is that he was in Illinois (where he died later that year) and his father just reported him as a son in Minnisota?

in Genealogy Help by Joelle Colville-Hanson G2G6 Mach 6 (62.3k points)

3 Answers

+7 votes
I've seen this once or twice before. Either (1) they are away from home on supposedly a temporary basis and they end up listed in both their original/permanent household and the household they are temporarily living in or (2) the censuses for the two households were taken at different times and the person moved between the 2 dates.
by Chase Ashley G2G6 Pilot (140k points)
I have a case in my family in the 1900 census where elderly parents lived with two sons, one in the country, one in town.  Both sons reported the parents as living with them.  The two enumerations were just a few days apart, so I think it’s unlikely the parents moved from one son to the other in the interval.
+3 votes
I’ve seen this a couple times. In my cases, there was a situation that caused questions in where the family would live.  One example was both parents died and the kids listed themselves in the census at their old house and the grandparents listed them again at their house.
by Gurney Thompson G2G6 Pilot (122k points)
+2 votes
Yep.  It happened.  Kind of weird when you first encounter it but I have three separate instances of it happening in my family tree alone.
by Crispin Reedy G2G6 Mach 4 (41.5k points)

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