Can someone with access to Ancestry.com check the sources for Gretta (Holman) Osborne?

+4 votes
324 views
The sources are on her FamilySearch profile.  I cleaned up duplicates there but I cannot view the sources that are attached to her.  Her life sketch says that many genealogists believe she never existed, and in the last G2G question about her, it was said that she was fabricated by a fraudulent genealogist.

Can someone look into the sources on Ancestry.com for me?  They're attached to her FamilySearch profile here:

https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/LV5P-618

I'm putting her husband in the WikiTree ID section of this question, because there are currently two profiles for Gretta that need to be merged.
WikiTree profile: Jonathan Osborne
in Genealogy Help by D. Botkin G2G6 Mach 3 (33.8k points)

5 Answers

+5 votes
Sorry this isn't more helpful.

US and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 (extracted from many sources *including family group sheets*): source number 119.000: Gretta Holman, female, born VA 1697, spouse name Jonathan Osborne, married 1722, VA

ibid, source 227.000: Gretta Hellman, female, spouse Jonathan  Osburn, spouse born En 1697, married 1722, VA

ibid, source 498.000: Greta Holman, female, spouse Jonathan Osborn, married VA 1721

Heritage Consulting, Millennium file (linked family records 'The Millennium File is a database created by the Institute of Family Research to track the records of its clients and the results of its professional research.') Gretta Holman, female, born 1701, Williamsburg, James City, Virginia,  USA, spouse Jonathan Osborn, child Ephraim OsbornOsborne

ibid: Gretta Holman, born 1701 Williamsburg, James City, Virginia

ibid (repeats data with Ephraim)

Ancestry family trees: no links
by Harry Ide G2G6 Mach 1 (15.4k points)

I was just going to say that none of those sources from Ancestry are useful because they are all user submitted.

I'm doing a search and found Gretta and Jonathan mentioned as parents:

According to unverified information from Mrs. H. R. Saffell and Maud Bliss's "My Father's People" the parents of Ephraim Osborne are Jonathan Osborne and Gretta Holman. He was christened 27 Mar. 1697-8 in Warwick, England; came to King & Queen Co., Va. 1720, sailing on the ship James Goodwill with David Crockett, Master, from Rotterdam, last port Falmouth; landed in James River Settlement 27 Oct. 1720. He was a member of Colonial Assembly of Va. 1741-2, and a member of King's Royal Guards in new york and Port Royal 1745 & 6. His wife, whom he married at Williamsburg, Va. ca. 1720 was born ca. 1697. - Source: Scofield, Flossie, compiler <PO Box 7, Neodesha, Kans. 66757>. "One Line of Descent Thomas Alley, Jacob Need and Allied Lines," Neodesha, Kansas : n.p., 1973, pg. 23.

+5 votes
The only certain source is an early Rowan County, NC Tax list for son Caleb Osborn.

Otherwise Ancestry.com has "third party" sources which are

good or unreliable depending on their origin ...

ie: a parish register vs. a family group sheet

and they are ...

* Millennium File
* U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
* FindAGrave.

However the last one does have some useful info on it in the "read more" section at ...

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/143299942
by N Gauthier G2G6 Pilot (123k points)
Can you transcribe the info on Caleb Osborn here?  I don't see a wikitree profile for him yet.
I don't remember exactly which record showed me before that he was their son. but below are some records I found for him ...

Caleb Osborne b: 1730 d: 07 Aug 1781

* North Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890 NC Early Census Index for Caleb Osborn, res: 1755 Rowan Co, NC

* North Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index 1790-1890 NC Early Census Index for Caleb Osborn, res: 1759 Rowan Co, NC

* U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 for Caleb Osborn, res: 1760 Rowan Co, NC; Document: Tax Records, 1758/1759 [NC State Archives]; call#C.R. 085.701.5; p25; family#12; "Account of Leaves for year . [1760?]"

* North Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes *Index 1790-1890 NC Early Census Index for Caleb Osborn res: 1761 Rowan Co, NC

* North Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890; NC Early Census Index; Early Tax List; for Caleb Osborn, res: 1761 Rowan Co, NC

* U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820
for Caleb Osborn, res: 1780 Rowan Co, NC - "Capt. Lyons' District"; Document: Tax List - 1779 [NC State Archives]; call#: C.R. 085.701.5; p50; family#8

* Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly. Magazine of Virginia Genealogy v23 #2 p35 with image: Virginia - North Carolina Migrations as identified in the first 10 deed books of Rowan County, NC by Jo White Linn, certified genealogist (Rowan County formed in 1753) ...

9:174; 26 Aug 1782 James Osborn of Washington Co, VA to William Osborn of Rowan for L500 hard money, 189.5 acres in the forks of the Yadkin River, part of a tract Caleb Osborn, deceased, conveyed his executor, James Osborn.
Jas. McCulloh, Mark Whitaker
Proved: November Court 1782

-------

Family trees say Caleb married Hannah HOWARD which is also found on Millenium and U.S. & Int. Marriage Records for Caleb. There was also a mention of for James Osborn & Mary Whittaker - MAYBE this is the one mentioned above ?

I think this is his memorial ...
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/138180506

This ancestry family tree ...
https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/105770908/person/120047785257/facts

had an image of a deed but I found it too hard to read. I could pick out that there were a dozen, non related names on it with Caleb Osborn being #6. image was titled "Deed Book V, 15-16"

Same family tree had another image of a map with description: Osborne, Caleb 1762  Rowan, North Carolina  You will note that Caleb was living by Squire Boone (the father of Daniel Boone) and Mark Whitaker - was he related to William Whitaker.
 

Another image titled: Caleb served on Grand Jury.

This family tree gave this lineage ...

.1 James Osborne b: 28 JUN 1672 Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, England d: 17 OCT 1716 Elizabethtown, Morris, New Jersey & Mary Anne Carter b: 1675 Stratford, England d: 1775 VA

..2 Jonathan Osborn b: 27 MARCH 1697 • Warwickshire, England d: 6 OCT 1761 Williamsburg, James, VA
& Gretta Denton Holman b: 1701 Williamsburg, James City, VA d: 1796 Montgomery, VA

...3 Ephraim Osborne Sr    1723–1796
...3 Johannah Osborne    1725–1734
...3 Caleb Osborne    1725–1781
...3 John Howard Osborne    1728–
...3 Josiah Osborne    1729–
...3 Jeremiah Osborne    1729–1805
...3 Stephen Osborne    1754–1820
Same family tree had a word document attached which read ...

CALEB OSBORNE

Caleb Osborne was born about 1723, birth place and date of birth are not known.1 It is believed that he may have come from New Jersey to North Carolina. It is believed that Caleb Osborne and Ephraim Osborne as they appear together in Rowan County, North Carolina may have been brothers, this connection has not been proven yet. It is believed that Caleb Osborne and Hannah were married sometime before 1740, date and place of marriage unknown.

Creation of Rowan County, North Carolina

On 13 March 1753, Caleb signed a petition bearing the signatures of 348 of the inhabitants of the upper and frontier portions of Anson County was read in the lower house of the Colonial Assembly. The petitioners noted the great hardship they had to undergo in traveling the vast distance to the courthouse in Anson and requested that a new county be designated. On 4 April a bill was introduced for “erecting a County.” Both houses of the Assembly passed the bill and on 12 April the acting governor, Matthew Rowan, signed it into law, thus creating Rowan County and St. Luke’s Parish.2

Rowan County remained the same in size for almost twenty years until 1770 when Guilford and Surry counties were cut off from Rowan. It was not until 1836 that Rowan was reduced to its present boundaries.

French and Indian Wars and Attacks

Ephraim Osborne, a fur trader, and his family, including sons Ephraim Jr., Enoch, Stephen, Jonathon, and Solomon came into the Grayson area around 1765 from the forks from the Yadkin, North Carolina. Caleb Osborne and Ephraim were from Essex County, New Jersey, where they were on the Elizabeth Town petition regarding land disputes along with other surnames later found in Grayson.3

From the onset Indians at times posed a threat to the peace and happiness of the settlers. Normally Indians were allies of the English, but the French who sought to claim all the land west of the mountains had won over the natives and encouraged them to attack frontier settlements. Beginning in 1753, the year Rowan County was created, the frontier was aflame from sporadic attacks by small groups of Indians. Outlying settlers were murdered and conferences were held in Salisbury between English officials and Indian chiefs to gain time, if not peace.4

As the French and Indian War progressed, however, the Indians grew bolder, murdering and pillaging all along the Catawba and Yadkin rivers. Following the disastrous defeat of General Edward Braddock at Fort Pitt in 1755, Governor Dobbs dispatched Captain Hugh Waddell of Wilmington with a force to erect a fort for the safety of the inhabitants of the backcountry. Dobbs’s first choice was a site near present-day Cleveland, but one farther west on a branch of Fourth Creek was chosen.

The need for forts is evident, as various Indian tribes resented the settlers’ intrusion into their hunting grounds. An incident illustrating this occurred to three of the Osborne brothers on a deer-hunting expedition into Watauga, North Carolina. While sleeping by their campfire on a wet night, they were suddenly attacked by Indians. Solomon was killed: Ephraim, Jr., and Enoch were separated in the dark, but each managed to return to the New River settlement.5 Such were the hazards of pioneer life.

Prior to 1759 most Indian outrages occurred in isolated attacks on small groups of settlers, but in that year these attacks were concentrated on towns and forts. Waddell, with sixty men from Fort Johnston on the coast, was sent again to the interior to cooperate with the miltia of Orange, Anson, and Rowan in halting these attacks.6

Waddell had scarcely reached his post at Fort Dobbs when on the night of 27 February 1760, the dogs within the fort warned him by “an uncommon noise” that something unusual was occurring in the forest beyond. An assault was made by two parties of Indians, but they were repelled with heavy Indian losses. Another band of Indians preparing for a night assault on Bethabara in the Moravian settlement was frightened away the ringing of the church bell. To stop these attacks an expedition led by Colonel Archibald Montgomery was sent into Indian territory in June, 1760. Montgomery was decisively beaten, but one year later another expedition under Colonel James Grant succeeded in destroying Indian power, thus eliminating further threats to western settlements.

Throughout the French and Indian War many colonists, despairing of their lives and fortunes, left their homes in Virginia and went to North Carolina, only to find after arriving that the Carolina frontier was no haven; thence, they retreated farther inland east of the Yadkin. During immigration was halted. The number of taxables in Rowan was estimated at 1,531in 1756. Three years later there were fewer than 800. But from 1761 until the outbreak of the Revolution the southward movement continued unabated, and the frontier was pushed seventy miles farther westward to the Blue Ridge.7

Tax Lists

Earliest settlement of Rowan County, North Carolina was made about 1737. The Scotch Irish were probably the most numerous and leading people of the settlement.

Earliest list of taxable persons in Rowan County, 1757 in bad condition on the walls of the

The 1759 Rowan County, North Carolina tax list was found between the walls of the old court house by Wm. D. Kizziah, Register of Deeds. When found, it was but scraps of Paper, but was fitted together and transcribed by him. This list was made before Rowan Co, NC was divided into other counties and is the oldest tax list ever found in Rowan (to my knowledge). It contains no figures and is not typed, there is a copy of this list, as transcribed by Mr. Kizziah, in the Rowan County Library, Salisbury, North Carolina.

Alexander Osborn & Negroe Tom, Will and Danah, Metthew Osborn, Sam’s Osborn, John Osborn, William Osborn, Ephrim Osborn, Jospeh Osborn, Caleb Osborn (Note the spelling on some of the names)

Caleb is listed in the 1755 Rowan County Census (tax list). No township is listed. He was also listed in the 1759 and the 1761 census and the 1761 early tax list. It should be noted that the Osborne’s were some of the earliest residents of the Yadkin, North Carolina. The Osborne clan that immigrated together was very typical of extended families that pioneered together and were guided by the family patriarch.

Court Records

Shortly after Rowan was created justices were appointed by the crown, and they set in motion machinery for administering the county. One of the first justices was Squire Boone father of Daniel Boone, the great wilderness pathfinder. Justices of the first court represented various sections of the county stretching from the Orange line and Dan River to the King’s line and as far west as present Lincolnton.8

The first Rowan County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions met in June, 1753, but the site of its meetings is unknown. This court was the major judicial body of the county, its members appointed by the crown. Recognized as the ruling body of the county, this court had great power and responsibility: it directed certain inhabitants to lay out roads; it tried minor criminal and civil cases; it appointed guardians for orphans; it settled estates; it fixed prices that could be charged at public ferries and inns. In short, the colonial court of plea and quarter sessions had other duties in addition to strictly legal ones. Many of these were assumed in later years by a board of county commissioners.9

The deed for the township lands was dated 4 February 1755. On that day William Churton and Richard Vigers, Granville’s agents, conveyed 635 acres of land for “Salisbury Township” to James Carter and Hugh Foster, trustees for Rowan County. The land upon which the public buildings had been erected was included in this tract. In this deed the name Salisbury was used for the first time; the name Rowan Courthouse had been used prior to 1755. Presumably, Salisbury was named after the cathedral town of Salisbury, England. Another possibility, however, is that it took its name from Salisbury Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, from which so many of Rowan’s early settlers came.

The courthouse was not completed before 1756, although the jail, pillory, and stocks were finished and in use before that date. Governor Arthur Dobbs, who had passed through Salisbury in the summer of 1755, found the town just laid out, the courthouse built, and seven or eight log houses erected. In 1766 Salisbury was made a borough town, one of six in North Carolina; this allowed the town to elect one representative to the colonial Assembly, addition to the county’s two act for “Regulating the Town of Salisbury.” The provided provided for a town “Commons,” stated certain restrictions regarding livestock, required householders to provide fire buckets and ladders, provided for a market-house, and designated eleven citizens of the town as commissioners.10 Salisbury was the judicial center of western North Carolina before the Revolution.

Religion

Many of the earliest settlers were of Quaker background. It is noted that Caleb and Ephraim Osborne were listed as being Quakers.11 A record says that many of the earliest settlers were of Quaker background, from such heavily Quaker areas as Burlington County, New Jersey. This is sign that some of the people from New Jersey immigrated to North Carolina. Bishop Francis Asbury, a preacher, in 1788 recorded in his journal that he enjoyed the hospitality of the home of Enoch Osborne, who was Asbury’s host on that occasion and at other times. In his journal Thursday 22 March 1792, states, “We made an early start for friend Osborne’s, on New River, fifteen miles distant. Here we were generously entertained. After talking and praying together, we were guided across the river, for which I was thankful, arriving at Fox Creek, we were guided across the river, for which I was thankful, arriving at Fox Creek, we crossed it eleven times, and tarried that night with c____, a nominal member of the Society of Friends, who used us very well.”12 It is to be noted that various records have concluded that Enoch and Caleb were brothers, which would make sense, they immigrated together to the Yadkin, North Carolina Valley.

The court chose a site for the public buildings of Rowan, and Edward Hughes was directed to obtain a grant of forty acres from Earl Granville’s agents for this purpose. John Dunn and John Whitsett were appointed to see that the land was laid off in a suitable manner, and Whitsett was awarded the contract for building the courthouse. The court directed that the courthouse should be of frame construction, 30 feet long and 20 feet wide, a story and a half high.13

Maps

One of the first maps of the area show the land of Caleb Osborne and the people who were living in the area. Squire Boone was in the same location in 1762 with them.14 In 1762 Earl Granville lets Caleb Osborn ______Co. N.C., have 579 acres of vacant land on Dutchman’s Creek ________ for 10 shillings, witnessed by John Agar and john Frehoak and proved ______by William Osborn of Rowan County, North Carolina, have 189 ½ acres beginning at black oak______ small pine, west to a stake, south to a stake, then to the beginning, ____(part of land owned by deceased Caleb Osborn whose executors let him have and witnessed by Mark Whitaker and James McCulloh and proved by the later in November 1768.15

At the bottom of the deed you will notice that the SSC’s were Samuel Osborn and Michael Coon, Michael Coon was a neighbor of Caleb’s; It is unknown who Samuel Osborn was. A SSC was a Sworn Chain Carrier. They were the people who marked off the property under the direction of the surveyor. They had chains at a predetermined length and they stretched them out as they measured off the acres. They would take the straightest route etc. to maximize the acreage.

... continued
... continued

Children of Caleb Osborne and Hannah his wife

- James Osborne, born about 1740 of Dutchman’s Creek, Sullivan County, Tennessee, and died 14 December 1821 in Castlewood, Russell County, Virginia.16 He married before 1765 in Castlewood, Russell County, Virginia, to Mary Whitaker. She was born 6 November 1769 in Rowan County, North Carolina. She was a daughter of William Whitaker Jr. and Elizabeth Carleton. She died 7 May 1822 in Castlewood, Russell County, Virginia.17

- Steven Osborne, born about 1743, of Dutchman’s Creek, Rowan County, North Carolina, and died 14 May 1829, Old Homestead, Scott County, Virginia.18 He married Comfort Langham, born about 1743, of North Carolina. She died 1 December 1824 in Scott County, Virginia.19

- Thomas Osborne, born about 1750, of Dutchman’s Creek, Rowan County, North Carolina, and died 17 August 1790 in Castlewood, Russell County, Virginia.20 He married Minnie about 1775 of Russell County, Virginia. She was scalped on 17 August 1790 in Russell County, Virginia.

- Sarah Osborne, born about 1756, in Elizabeth Town, Rowan County, North Carolina. She married Thomas Dedman about 1789 in North Carolina.21

- Morgan Osborn, born about 1758, in Elizabeth Town, Rowan County, North Carolina. He married Susannah about 1780.22

- William Osborn, born about 1763, in Elizabeth Town, Rowan County, North Carolina, and died 10 May 1841 in Warrick, Indiana. He first married Fanny Finney on 12 March 1777 in Amelia, Virginia, she was born 1750 in Raliegh, Wake, North Carolina and she died 1820 in Greenup, Greenup County, Kentucky. He next married Susannah Feagley, on 13 August 1828,23 born about 1787 in Rowan County, North Carolina and died about 1870 in Logan County, Kentucky.24

sources:

1 Eva Cragun Heiner, Caleb Osborne Family Group Sheet, Caleb Osborn and Hannah, possession of Gaylynne Heiner Hone, Payson, Utah.

2 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Division of Archives and History, Revised, 1977, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), F262 .RB B695 1977

3 Paula Hathaway Anderson-Green, published in the Virginia magazine of history and Biography, Volume 86, Number 4, October 1978, The New River Frontier Settlement.

4 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page 8, Provo, Utah.

5 Paula Hathaway Anderson-Green, published in the Virginia magazine of history and Biography, Volume 86, Number 4, October 1978, The New River Frontier Settlement.

6 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page 9, Provo, Utah.

7 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page10, Provo, Utah

8 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page 10, Provo, Utah.

9 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page 7, Provo, Utah

10 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page 8, Provo, Utah

11 Robert W. Ramsey, Carolina Cradle – Settlement of the northwest Carolina Frontier, 1747-1762, Note: Rowan County, North Carolina Court Minutes, I, 3-7, Harold B. Lee (HBLL) book 975 .671 . R149c, page 130, Provo, Utah. Note: A tombstone in Boone Burying Gound in cemetery in Eaton’s Baptist Church, and in the churchyard at present-day “Tanglewood,” near Clemmons North Carolina, This would be a good place to start further research on Caleb Osborne by looking at the cemetery records of the Easton’s Baptist Church and the Quaker records of the area.

12 Paula Hathaway Anderson-Green, published in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, V86, pages 413-431 (1978)

13 James S. Brawley, Rowan County: A Brief History, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL), book F 262 .R8 B695, 1977, page 7, Provo, Utah.

14 James W. Kluttz, Early landowners of Rowan County, North Carolina, Family History Library (FHL) map case, 975.671 E7kj, 1762, Salt Lake City, Utah.

15 Joe Osborn, Rowan, North Carolina Land Grant, North Carolina State Archives, Secretary of State, Granville Proprietary Land Office, Entries, Warrants, Surveys, 1748-1763, Reel 14 s. 108.283, website: http://www.osborne-origins.org.

16 Eva Cragun Heiner, Caleb Osborne Family Group Sheet, Caleb Osborn and Hannah, possession of Gaylynne Heiner Hone, Payson, Utah.

17 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Family History Library (FHL), Film # 1396081, Salt Lake City, Utah

18 Eva Cragun Heiner, Caleb Osborne Family Group Sheet, Caleb Osborn and Hannah, possession of Gaylynne Heiner Hone, Payson, Utah.

19 Eva Cragun Heiner, Caleb Osborne Family Group Sheet, Caleb Osborn and Hannah, possession of Gaylynne Heiner Hone, Payson, Utah.

20 Eva Cragun Heiner, Caleb Osborne Family Group Sheet, Caleb Osborn and Hannah, possession of Gaylynne Heiner Hone, Payson, Utah.

21 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter –day Saints, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Family History Library (FHL), Film # 1396081, Salt Lake City, Utah.

22 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Bracken County, Kentucky, Will Book B, Family History Library (FHL) Film # 851649 #3, Salt Lake City, Utah.

23 Yates, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900,

24 Eva Cragun Heiner, Caleb Osborne Family Group Sheet, Caleb Osborn and Hannah, possession of Gaylynne Heiner Hone, Payson, Utah.
Another family tree listing same parents at ...

https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/77677603/person/36374147766/facts

has an image titled: Caleb Land Grant 1761.

And an attached document titled: "History of Caleb Osborne and Hannah Osborne" that is 73 pages long.
+2 votes

Records from back then were sparse, especially for women. Church records may be a good resource. Have you checked out the Virginia Genealogy site: https://vgs.org/index.php.

The only things I found in Ancestry were two Millennium files for Gretta Holman and Jonathan Osborn.  If you would like, I can email the screen shots. Info about the Millennium file source is below. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. 

About Millennium File

The Millennium File is a database created by the Institute of Family Research to track the records of its clients and the results of its professional research. It contains more than 880,000 linked family records, with lineages from throughout the world, including colonial America, the British Isles, Switzerland, and Germany. Many of these lineages extend back to nobility and renowned historical figures. In fact, one of the things the Millennium File focuses on is linking to European nobility and royalty.

A good way to have success in using this database is identify at least one Gateway Ancestor. A Gateway Ancestor is an early American immigrant who has been identified as having roots in British or European nobility. In this database there are about 300 Gateway Ancestors, or in other words, there are about 300 individuals who have proven ties to nobility or royalty. Source information is also provided in this database, making it easier to verify the accuracy of the research done.

The Millennium File is a compiled source and is similar in form to other linked databases, such as Ancestry World Tree. Databases like these are great starting points for beginning your research. It is always good to find out what others have already learned and compiled about your ancestors.

by Debbie Goddard G2G1 (1.6k points)
+1 vote

I went to Ancestry and did a broad search. Came up with little of any genealogical value except when I found a link to The Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol 25, No. 1, p. 18. Tithables list has Osbornes. Here's a screenshot. It may or may not be of value, but I think this periodical would be worth searching.

Well I tried to add the screenshot but it wouldn't attach.

by Victoria English G2G6 Mach 3 (31.6k points)
+1 vote

Hi D. Botkin,

We have the Virginia Project for work on Virginia profiles (pre or post 1700), please join us if you have an interest in Virginia:

You may find leads on our page for sourcing Virginia profiles here:

Here is info on Gretta's possible death county:

Please feel free to add more sources to the Grayson County page if you have them for that county.

Thanks.

-William

by William Foster G2G6 Mach 9 (96.0k points)

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