Russian? Hungarian

+2 votes
129 views

I'm not sure what language but I have some DNA match and would like to find out what I can.

1 Петро Попик (b. 1893, d. 1979, Луцьк)

+ Марія (  (b. 1893, d. 1975, Луцьк)

. . 2 image(H839787)Микола Попик (b. 1 JAN 1937, с. Зимне, , d. 14 APR 2009, Луцьк)

. . . + Ольга Гуцуляк • до всиновлення (b. 12 DEC 1945, d. 13 MAY 1983, Луцьк)

. . . + Марія Собіна (b. 15 FEB 1930, с. Пенянка, Краснопольський рн, Сумська обл., d. 3 JUN 1996, Луцьк)

. . 2 Олександр Попик (b. 20 OCT 1923, d. 1 OCT 1993, с. Зимне, )

. . . + Юстинія Пасальська (b. 29 SEP 1922, с. Шистів, , d. 3 AUG 1998, м. Устилуг, )

. . . . 3 Ніна Попик (b. 22 SEP 1951, с. Шистів, , d. 15 AUG 2016, м. Устилуг, )

. . 2 Сергій Попик (Україна, d. 1993)

. . . + Галина Дмитренко (b. 1932, Україна, d. 1995)

. . 2 Любов Попик (b. 13 MAR 1939, Polska, d. 26 AUG 2015)

Thanks for your help

in Genealogy Help by Krys Feyen G2G6 (9.5k points)
retagged by Maggie N.
Just for the record there are other languages written in a Cyrillic alphabet: Ukrainian, Bulgarian, and some of the languages from the former Yugoslavia. There are some minor differences.

In each case the first couple of words of each line is the name. If you go to the Wikipedia article on Russian alphabet, you can find the common transliteration of the letters. From that the names should become something recognizable. Some of the letters have more than one transliteration, but the name should be recognizable. Google translation will sometimes translate, or try to translate the name, if the name is a common word, so you could get some funny names.

Some other relevant points, much of Poland was under Russian control for a long time, so many Polish records are in Russian.

All that aside, Russian is by far the largest of these countries, so Russian would be the first choice for your matches shown in the query.
Never in its entire history has the Hungarian language ever used the Cyrillic alphabet. Why do people even vaguely consider it when faced with non-Latin letters?
J, I think some folks, having not looked into the topic at all, lump everyone east of Germany into some vague mass of "Russians". Nevermind that Hungarian isn't Slavic; it's not even Indo-European! (It's a Uralic language, for anyone wondering).
I just want to comment that I have seen several Hungarian registries in the area NE of Kosice, in Slovakia, that have Cyrillic entries for about a ten year span between 1855-1865. (Those dates are estimated, I don’t have that info in front of me). These entries have been extremely frustrating for me as the handwriting is difficult to read to try to determine what is written in those records. And the time period always seems to falls into the next generation back for many of the records I am seeking. So there are definitely Cyrillic entries in those Hungarian registries, particularly in the Greek Catholic records.

So, when one has a record that has Hungarian and Latin entries, and this Cyrillic shows up, it seems perfectly reasonable to me to presume that what one is attempting to read is Hungarian. Since it is so difficult for me to read, I cannot say if occupations or descriptions are Latin or Hungarian (written in Cyrillic). I’ll have to attempt to figure that out one day.
All of the Greek Catholic registers in Cyrillic letters that I've encountered have been in Rusyn or Church Slavonic, not Hungarian.

(But I find that despite not knowing the alphabet or associated languages at all, it's easier to figure out and find names in Cyrillic than in that dratted Kurrentschrift.)

3 Answers

+4 votes
 
Best answer

Hi! I speak some Russian, so I'll translate what I can. :)

1. Petro Popik, b. 1893-1973, Lutsk. (Lutsk is a place)

2. Maria, b. 1893-1975, Lutsk

3. Mikola Popik, b. 1 January, 1937, arounf winter, d. 14 April 2009, Lutsk

4.Olga Gutsulyak, (I didn't know what До Свиновлення meant so I used google translate and it said "to the pig"; this might be an idiom or expression I don't know.) b. 12 December 1945, d. 13 May 1983, Lutsk.

  1. Maria Sobina, b. 15 February 1930, С. Пенянка (could not find translation) red Polish (unsure translation) Sumy region, d. 3 June 1996, Lutsk.
  2. Oleksandr (probably anglicizes to Alexander) Popik, b. 20 October 1923, d. 1 October 1993, around winter.
  3. Yustinia Pasalska, b. 29 September 1922, around Shistiv, (a town in the Ukraine) died 3 August 1998, m. Ustiluh (a town in the Ukraine)
  4. Nina Popik, b. 22 September, 1951, around Shistiv, died 15 August, 2015, m. Ustiluh.
  5. Sergii Popik, Ukraine, d.1993
  6. Galina Dmitrenko b, 1932, Ukraine, d. 1995
  7. Lyubov Popik (Lyubov means "love" in Russian) b. 13 March 1939, Polish, d. 26 August, 2016.

I hope this was helpful! 

by Erin Johnson G2G6 Mach 1 (12.7k points)
selected by Krys Feyen
A HUGE help.  Thanks so very much Erin.
My pleasure! I'm always excited when I get to do something with Russian. I also realized that I forgot to transcribe "С Пенянка" in Roman script it's "s penyanka" and I think it means "around Penyanka."

To the pig!  cheeky

In Ukrainian it means "before adoption."

That's really interesting! Thank you! :)
+4 votes

Russian, Hungarian alphabet is not Cyrillic script based.

Use Google Translate Russian to English, or to language of your choice.  Using this I find:

Петро Попик (b. 1893, d. 1979, Луцьк)is

Петро Попик = Peter Popik

Луцьк = Lutsk
Hope this helps.
by LJ Russell G2G6 Pilot (166k points)
Thanks Krys.  Google Translate may not be perfect all of the time, but it is a great help.
+2 votes

It seems to be in Russian and Ukrainin (the letter 'i'  is Ukrainnian). Lutsk (Луцк) is now in Ukraine.

by anonymous G2G Crew (650 points)

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