52 Ancestors Week 36: School Days

+12 votes
735 views

Time for the next 52 Ancestors challenge!

Please 52 Ancestors and 52 Photos sharing challenge badgesshare with us a profile of an ancestor or relative who matches this week's theme:

School Days

From Amy Johnson Crow:

It's back to school time here in the U.S. Many school districts in my area have been back for 2 or 3 weeks already! This week's theme is "School Days." Have you used school records or yearbooks to find out more about your ancestors? Do you have photos or memorabilia from their time in school? How about any teachers or school staff in the family tree. Write about it this week!

Share below!

Participants who share every week can earn badges. If this is your first time participating and you don't have the participation badge, or if you pass a milestone (13 in 13, 26 in 26, 52 in 52) let us know hereClick here for more about the challenge. 

in The Tree House by Eowyn Langholf G2G Astronaut (1.4m points)
edited by Eowyn Langholf
Oops meant to answer not to comment - please ignore!

47 Answers

+8 votes

I haven't found any interesting school related stories in my own family and school records haven't played a big part in my research, so today I am going to pick one of my wife's relatives Rev. Robert Henderson and his children.
Robert was ordained as a Presbyterian minister but decided his calling was to be a missionary in India.
His first job when he arrived in India was Principal of the High School in Ahmadabad. He spent a couple of years in in Broach where he organised schools amongst other activities. He spent the majority of his career as a missionary in Borsad which was an already established mission with several schools but more than doubled the number of schools, built churches an orphanage and many other buildings. After 20 years in Borsad he returned home to Ireland but the bug of India would not let go and his returned to India again this time to the city of Surat where running the schools was again an important aspect of his role.
Robert's life story is remembered in a book "Robert Henderson. The Story of a Missionary Greatheart in India" written by John Sinclair Stevenson shortly after Robert's death in 1921. This book can be downloaded for free from https://missiology.org.uk/book_robert-henderson_stevenson.php
One of the challenges of researching family history for missionaries (apart from when someone conveniently writes a book about them) and their families is they tend to be in places where there are few records online and they travel around a lot so turn up in unexpected places.
When researching Robert's family I found three of his children in the 1911 England census living at a boarding school in Sevenoaks, Kent, England even though they were born in India and the family were normally in Ireland when they were not in India.
by Ray Hawkes G2G6 Mach 2 (25.1k points)
+6 votes
Until about a hundred years ago, almost all of my ancestors that had attended school were clergymen (and the occasional attorney).  That sort of ties into the religion theme with the photos.
by K. Anonymous G2G6 Mach 7 (72.8k points)
+6 votes

My featured profile this week is Rena Lee Murdock. Rena Lee, my 1st cousin 1x removed excelled as an elementary educator.

By the way, I was an educator in my first career--I taught high school biology for 25 years.

by Nelda Spires G2G6 Pilot (131k points)
+8 votes

I have many teachers among my ancestors and was one myself but today I wish to celebrate my 3G grandfather, Rufus Nutting.  Rufus was born in Massachusetts in 1793 and attended Dartmouth College when it was still a tiny school out in the New Hampshire wilderness.  After graduation he became an instructor in a “Female Seminary” at Catskill, New York. Later he taught at the Randolph Academy.  He published “Nutting’s English Grammar.” A simplified book which was long used in the Vermont schools. When Western Reserve College was started at Hudson, Ohio, he joined the faculty as a professor of Latin and Greek.  In 1847 he established an Academy at Lodi, Michigan.  When he finally retired, he and his wife moved to Detroit where he was a missionary, teaching about the word of Christ.  On his profile page is an excerpt of a letter written by his granddaughter praising his teaching.  For Rufus “School Days” incorporated his entire life.  Here are Rufus and his wife with a book, most likely a Bible:

by Ward Hindman G2G6 (9.8k points)
+5 votes

My grandmother Doris May Lindsay in 1922 graduated Shirtleff Junior High in Chelsea, Massachusetts and was class speaker; In 1925 Doris graduated from Chelsea Senior High with honors; was a freshman at Boston University in 1925/1926 and graduated in 1929 with a B.S. (School of Education/Social Service). During the summers of 1925, '26, '27 and 1928 Doris attended Simmons College. Doris also attended Lincoln School in Wakefield, Massachusetts for 7 years.

Doris also attended The Ocean Park School of Methods in Maine as a delegate from the Chelsea First Baptist Church.

Doris, in her high school and college years, was an assistant at the Chelsea Public Library for 7 years and was active in religous and social work. While at college, Doris was President of the French Club and Chairman of the program committee of the Elementary Club and she became Director of schools in Wells River, Newbury Vermont and Framingham, Massachusetts.

by Keith Cook G2G6 Mach 1 (19.1k points)
+7 votes

Nana Mahoney

My Grandmother, Elizabeth Mahoney, Kindegarten about 1895,  She is at the end of the second row from the top.

by Sally Mahoney G2G6 Mach 2 (21.6k points)
+7 votes

If secondary education photos count for this topic, here's my paternal grandfather's photo when he graduated from the Naval Academy in 1926/27:  https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Truslow-201

by Dorothy Truslow G2G4 (4.7k points)
+9 votes

My only remaining uncle was recently able to shed some light on a relative that I only knew about from his gravestone.  My uncle mentioned that this relative had been a teacher in a particular school.  After a bit of googling I found a wonderful resource that mentioned him by name.

Irwin Rainey was a teacher at Coleraine Academical Institute ("Coleraine Inst.") in Coleraine, County Londonderry.  Fortunately for me they are one of the few schools in the region to have their own museum. The museum's website says the following about Irwin:

'A small but significant corner of the museum gives a flavour of “The Bookroom.” Pupils of the 1950s-70s era will remember Mr Irwin Rainey: in the days before on-line ordering, every school relied on one teacher who co-ordinated all the book and stationery orders, as well as billing boys for books in those far-off times when every textbook had to be paid for!'

by Linda Hawkes G2G6 Mach 2 (22.6k points)
+6 votes

image

From: History of Cambria County, PA, Col. 2, Henry Wilson Storey, The Lewis Publishing Co., 1907, pg 423


“Across the Bedford pike from the residence of James Penrod, then belonging to Ludwig Wissinger, stood the first school within the present limits of Walnut Grove. It was built soon after the earliest settlements in this community and was never used for free school purposes. It is known to have been there however as late as 1831, when one William Berry taught in it. It was a log structure and had a window in each side, about eight feet wide and about a foot and a half high, being an aperture made by sawing out pieces of two logs composing the wall. Greased paper was stretched across these openings instead of glass, and no passing circus ever tempted a craning of necks to peer through these paper windows. The desks consisted of boards laid on pins driven into the walls. The benches were slabs supported by huge pins. The floor was made of logs split in halves with the flat sides turned up. Wood was burned in an open fire place, and as much smoke found its way through the clap-board roof as through the chimney. Among those who acquired the rudiments of an education in this primitive school, were the elder Wissingers, the Vickroys, the Slicks – among whom were Squire B. F. and William the surveyor – John and Abe Stutzman, and Jacob Wertz. Among the pedagogues who here fashioned the quill and incited a thirst for knowledge, was a son of the Green Isle, John Mineely, who combined teaching, preaching and weaving into a method for securing a livelihood. As a teacher in early times his name is given honorable mention in the 1887 Pennsylvania Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. It remained for a Scotch successor, James Roach, to introduce the shillalah as a disciplining factor ; he used to compel obedience to the rules of his school by the vigorous application of his black-haw cane upon the most convenient part of any boy who had the temerity to be obstreperous. 'No babbling then was suffered in our schools – the scholars' test was silence.' It is said John Stutzman most frequently failed to measure up to the standard of the test, and was oftenest knocked down, which knocking was however received without a display of an undue amount of ill humor.
“Two dollars per quarter or three cents a day was paid for tuition, and the flogging was administered gratuitously and liberally.

by Robert Wissinger G2G3 (3.6k points)
+5 votes

“Across the Bedford pike from the residence of James Penrod, then belonging to Ludwig Wissinger, stood the first school within the present limits of Walnut Grove. It was built soon after the earliest settlements in this community and was never used for free school purposes. It is known to have been there however as late as 1831, when one William Berry taught in it. It was a log structure and had a window in each side, about eight feet wide and about a foot and a half high, being an aperture made by sawing out pieces of two logs composing the wall. Greased paper was stretched across these openings instead of glass, and no passing circus ever tempted a craning of necks to peer through these paper windows. The desks consisted of boards laid on pins driven into the walls. The benches were slabs supported by huge pins. The floor was made of logs split in halves with the flat sides turned up. Wood was burned in an open fire place, and as much smoke found its way through the clap-board roof as through the chimney. Among those who acquired the rudiments of an education in this primitive school, were the elder Wissingers, the Vickroys, the Slicks – among whom were Squire B. F. and William the surveyor – John and Abe Stutzman, and Jacob Wertz. Among the pedagogues who here fashioned the quill and incited a thirst for knowledge, was a son of the Green Isle, John Mineely, who combined teaching, preaching and weaving into a method for securing a livelihood. As a teacher in early times his name is given honorable mention in the 1887 Pennsylvania Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. It remained for a Scotch successor, James Roach, to introduce the shillalah as a disciplining factor ; he used to compel obedience to the rules of his school by the vigorous application of his black-haw cane upon the most convenient part of any boy who had the temerity to be obstreperous. 'No babbling then was suffered in our schools – the scholars' test was silence.' It is said John Stutzman most frequently failed to measure up to the standard of the test, and was oftenest knocked down, which knocking was however received without a display of an undue amount of ill humor.
“Two dollars per quarter or three cents a day was paid for tuition, and the flogging was administered gratuitously and liberally.

image

This early school house stood on the property of Ludwig Wissinger, at the corner of what is now Penrod and Bedford streets, and was built soon after the earliest settlement. It was never used for full school purposes (at this time the law made provision only for education for children whose parents were unable to pay) and so a tuition charge of $2 per quarter or 3 cents per day was made. The early teacher received $25.00 per month and the charge for room and board was $2.00 per week. along with their teaching, it was expected they would sweep the school at least once each day, build the fire, and carry out all other janitorial duties. 

This first school was a log structure with one window on each side covered with greased paper.  The desks were boards fastened in place by pins in the wall.  The benches were slabs of wood supported by large pins, while the floor was made of half logs with the flat side placed upward to give a flat surface for walking.  It was heated by burning wood in an open fire place. Some of the names occurring on the school roster included:  Wissingers, Vickroys, Slicks, Stutzmans, and Wertz."

by Robert Wissinger G2G3 (3.6k points)
+7 votes

Both parents and all 4 grandparents were teachers - I like this because grandfather W Holt Seale was a teacher and a principal, but baseball was always a favorite pastime. He taught at various schools in Spokane, WA; Moscow and Coeur d'Alene Idaho, and Toppenish, WA.  https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Seale-663

by Robert Seale G2G4 (4.8k points)
edited by Robert Seale
+6 votes

This is my dad's entry in the 1943 Humes High Yearbook (Memphis, TN).  When we first saw it and the motto his fellow students gave him ("His form was of the manliest beauty"), we had a bit of a laugh, as we used to tease him by calling him a "lovable bronze god."  Dad was very active in ROTC in high school, and tried to join both the Army and Navy as soon as he graduated, but they said they couldn't take him as he had had a recent eye problem.  They told him to come back in six months, but he refused, saying he wasn't going to wait any longer.  He joined the US Merchant Marine and served in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in troop transports.  He was at anchor in the Philippines when the war ended.  Then they drafted him for the Korean War, sent him to OCS, and commissioned him.  He served in combat in Korea and Vietnam, and retired from the Army as a Colonel.  He administered the commissioning oaths in the US Navy to both me and my brother.

by Anneliese Kennedy G2G6 (9.8k points)
Sorry, can't see your photo.
Don’t know what happened. It was there yesterday, when I linked it back to the image on his profile. Can’t fix it till I get back to my computer after my out-of-town trip.
I think the problem is that you've linked to a locked profile.  You can see it but others can't.  To test that, log out of WikiTree, then try and view it.

I did that several times before anyone even told me, so now I always comment when I see that happening.  The easiest way to fix it is to also link the photo to any older ancestor whose profile is not locked.  At least, that worked for me.
+6 votes

My father, Dr. Thomas Joseph Norris Jr, was the son and grandson of railroad men whose lack of education limited their career options and their families’ opportunities. His scholastic and athletic achievements enabled him to pursue a higher education. This photo shows him, with his hair still mussed from his cap, after receiving his doctorate of education at the University of Kentucky in 1962. He is surrounded by his proud, beaming family. A teacher, coach, principal and public school system superintendent, he handed his three children their high school diplomas before they, too, advanced to college. A champion of education for all, he integrated his public school system, created special education and remedial classes and drove bond issues that built new schools and increased teachers’ salaries. He was a leading force behind establishment of a junior college that has now graduated more than 17,000 students.

by Ann Anonymous G2G Crew (650 points)
edited by Ann Anonymous
Can't see this one either.
Thanks for the heads up, Julie. I can see the photo, so could you please let me know what if anything you can see?

You can see it because you are either profile manager, or on the trusted list. 

 This image is privacy protected. Only the thumbnail is open.

We who are not cannot see the image.

You need to either change the privacy level of the profile where it is attached, or put it on a space page, an open profile, or upload it to an image hosting site.

Thanks, Melanie.  I should have said that the first time.
Thanks, Melanie. We newbies sometimes need a nonjudgmental helping hand.
+6 votes

My maternal grandparents, Paul Francis Summers and Evalina Sasscer, attended high school together at Baden Agriculture High School in Prince George's County MD, class of 1916.  I am lucky to have a picture of their class. 

Baden Agricultural High School, Class of 1916

See my blog post on this at [https://annesgenealogyadventures.blogspot.com/2019/09/52-ancestors-2019-week-36-school-days.html "#52 Ancestors School Days: Baden Agricultural High School"]

by Anne Agee G2G6 (6.6k points)
edited by Anne Agee
Also can't see this photo either.  Three in a row.  I wonder if it's a problem with my browser or...?
No, Julie, it is the privacy level, NOT your browser.
Yes.  Anne, please see above two posts for more details.
+5 votes

Highfields School, Beeches road, Worc. June 1938  Mixed Form 1.

This photograph was my Mom's it had been ripped in half presumable by me when I was a toddler, luckily grown up me has a copy of Photoshop....

Form other photos I found of [https://www.wikitree.com/index.php?title=Fletcher-7687/ my Mom] as a child I believe she is in the third row back forth from the left

by Robin Taylor G2G Crew (810 points)
edited by Robin Taylor
Thank you for this photo! The half you have is wonderful!
Thank You!!!

reset size to 640 :)
+5 votes

I have many teachers in my family, especially in the family of my paternal Grandmother. The tradition of teaching goes back to 7th Great Uncle Samuel Doak who founded Washington College in LImestone, Tennessee. 

From what I have been told, my 2nd Great Grandparents John Henry Sanders and Elizabeth Deery Alison wanted to make sure the family stayed in the area near Washington College and I believe all of his daughters attended school there. At one time or another, all of the daughters except the youngest taught school at one time or another. My Great Grandmother Gertrude Sanders Ford was a teacher and became the principal at Piney Flats High School and then the principal of Anderson Street Elementary School in Bristol, Tennessee. She was the Grand Worthy Matron of the Tennessee Eastern Star the year she died. The day of her funeral, the Bristol schools were closed in her honor. At the time of her death, my Grandmother Pauline Ford was one of the teachers at Anderson Street.

Her sister, Mary Sanders, taught music in Ohio, New York City, and compiled song books for the Girl Scouts. I don't know much about her sister Myrtle, who died at age 38 in 1919. The inscription on her headstone reads "Myrtle Sanders Grant gave the best of her life to the education of the children of Tennessee this service was ended November 6, 1919. Her influence lives on."

by Emily Holmberg G2G6 Mach 5 (59.5k points)
edited by Emily Holmberg
+5 votes

52 Ancestors - Week 36: School Days

Miss Loraine Beebe was the first school teacher in Kankakee County, Illinois in 1837. The post office was also named after her because her husband was the first postmaster of Momence.

image
The Loraine School, named after Loraine Beebe, was built in 1894.
500px-Momence_High_School-1.jpg
The inside of the Loraine school was beautiful. Everywhere you looked you saw beautiful wood. And the staircases were stunning. I remembering sliding down them as a child.
500px-Momence_High_School-9.jpg
The outside was built of beautiful red brick, while the basement had a cream color brick.
 

This school was built for the overflow of students from the Union and Central schools. Loraine School was built for the needs of the students from the Southside of Momence. Later on only the 6th grade students from Momence and the 4th grade students from the Southside were taught there.

Around 1960, my family moved to the Southside, and I was in 4th grade. I thought I was going to be able to go to school at the Loraine School. But it wasn't to happen. We moved too late, so I had to either take the  school bus or walk across town to get to school. And where did the bus pick up the kids - The Loraine School.

When I was in 6th grade, I did get to go to the Loraine School, and I was so happy. You felt different. You were away from all of the other kids. Just your class all together. It was a great year.

In 1965, the school board voted to raze the school against some heated opposition. The School had been standing for 70 years and was considered a historical landmark to many. But on 31 Jul 1966, the Loraine School was demolished.

I think the whole town watched. The local newspapers were all there, and it was a very sad day.
500px-Momence_High_School-7.jpg

by Cheryl Hess G2G6 Pilot (907k points)
edited by Cheryl Hess
+5 votes
I was always proud that my grandmother Merle (Rowley) Eastman (Rowley-1050) was able to attend school until she graduated as teacher from a small school in Mitchell, South Dakota. Both her adopted daughter Marie (Eastman) Fadden Gates and her daughter-in-law Elaine (Tennis) Eastman were graduated teachers also. Marie was graduated from California State University in Long Beach, California and taught kindergarten for over 26 years. Elaine was graduated from a college in Chicago and taught elementary school in California for 28 years. Both retired and were able to enjoy their retirements before their deaths.
by Judy Bramlage G2G6 Mach 8 (83.5k points)
+3 votes
My father, Thomas P Higgins Sr.was an elementary school principal for 34 years.My brother, Dr. Thomas P Higgins Jr. was a junior high school teacher, high school teacher, high school principal, and superintendent of schools in Connecticut and New York, USA. Presently retired, he is an adjunct professor at Pace University in New York.I am a retired ESOL teacher in CT and presently volunteer as a facilitator for an ESOL conversation class at the local library. School teaching is in the genes!
by Rosemary Dill G2G3 (3.2k points)
+3 votes
School census records let me link my 3x great grandmother  Allie Billings (Billings-779) to her father (parents)   She was incorrectly listed as Allen in the only census she was recorded with her parents in.  Luckily school census records for some of the years she was recorded listed parents of the children providing a bit more definitive proof than other years where you had to use circumstantial evidence from recorded sibling groups to identify the links.
by Brandi Morgan G2G6 Mach 1 (14.1k points)

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