Where and what is the source information on Andrew Greele(y) birth in Nottingham, England?

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WikiTree profile: Andrew Greeley
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Andrew Greele(y) born in Nottingham around 1590 has a surname with Huguenot origins. The first influx of Huguenot lace makers arrived in Nottingham, England,  between 1563 and 1568. they were Flemish Protestants who came from the Mechelen area in Belgum. In 1572 a second wave  of lacemakers arrived in Nottingham from Lille, France, after The Massacre of the Feast of Saint Bartholomew. The big problem with finding evidence of your Andrew's birth is that the original Huguenot spelling of Greely was completely mangled into many variants in public and church records. Variants probably exist for the same person in different records!  I believe that he was almost certainly born in Nottingham because of the Huguenot connection although 1590 seems to be a bit of an inspired guess based on his son Andrew's birth record for 1617. His parents could well have been of Belgum, French, or Nottingham origin.

This is a real toughie. I wish you good fortune on this one.

Regards

John Shipton

Devon, England
by John Shipton G2G6 Mach 1 (12.6k points)
I am the 12th generation descended from Andrew Greeley born 1617. I have had my DNA tested and genetic markers indicated that my Y-DNA takes my deep ancestry through Scandinavia across an ancient land bridge into the British Isles and has strong indicators of Scots-Irish ancestry. Given the fact that Nottingham was (to the best of my knowledge) originally a Viking settlement, I'm inclined that Andrew is more likely of Scots-Irish ancestry rather than French Huguenot origin.
If the surname Greeley comes from northern France, as many people seem to think, that fact alone is hardly inconsistent with men carrying the name today having Viking ancestry in the distant past. Northern France was, after all, settled by Vikings in the ninth century.
I am the 14th generation descended from Andrew Greele born 1617 and my grandmother has a book that traces the Greely line back to the MacGreles who lived on the Isle of Barra which is off the coast of Scotland. Furthermore, I have also read that the Greely line could have reached even farther back to Scandinavia or Ireland as well. I have not read any records or test results that concide with the theory that the Greele name originated in Northern France.
Since my original comment in 2015, I have had my DNA exhaustively tested. My YDNA subclade is at I-Y29630 which definitely has strong connection through Scandinavia, specifically northern Denmark, southern Sweden and southern Norway. I have no DNA connection in the Isle of Barra as far as any testing results reveal.
Your own DNA alone can't be relied on, but if we suppose that a whole bunch of Greeleys have the same DNA because they descend from the same immigrant, then somewhere they probably have some very distinctive mutations that could help to pin down the immigrant, eventually.  But those mutations haven't been identified yet.

When the companies talk vaguely about northern Denmark, southern Sweden and southern Norway, they mean that the identified mutations are relatively widespread, and so, relatively early.  They might tell you something about where your immigrant's distant ancestors lived, way back in prehistory.

How that type made the journey to England is anybody's guess.  A Y type can travel thousands of miles in one generation, e.g. in a Roman auxiliary.  Or, it can make the same journey in hundreds of small steps, generation by generation, village to village.

The same Y type will have made other journeys in other directions.  Many of those journeys will have ended in extinction without trace.  Some may have ended in proliferation and an extant cluster.  But that would have nothing to do with your own ancestry.

The woffle about land bridges is just the sort of padding that the companies make up to fudge over the fact that they don't have what they lead people to expect.
In response to your admonishment of my DNA testing with regards the vagueness of DNA testing companies purportment of DNA subclades as related to any specific geographical area. Specific sublcades have been associated by scientific communities of genetic research outside of DNA testing companies. Specific to my YDNA testing, my subclades have been associated with these areas aforementioned in my previous comment. Yes I agree with you that one DNA sample is not enough to substantiate specific location. However, having said. there is another individual (of the same surname) descended from Andrew Greele who matches my Y111 STR markers with the exception of 3 particular STR markers. We are 10th cousins based on the Greeley family tree. I have another individual who is an exact match to my particular YDNA subclade who is from Sweden. Because they are not a part of WikiTree or other DNA projects and I do not have permission from them implicitly or explicitly, I can not disclose their particulars due to privacy concerns.

I had a complete YDNA, mtDNA, and autosomal testing through Living DNA who based findings on a Britain specific genetic study of local population who have lived in the British Isles for generations in specific geographic areas of the same. My particular ancestry has been exhaustively researched and the whole of it is specific to the British Isles going back to the late 15th to early 16th century, with exception of one individual.

I am the individual who originally posed the question in October 2012 as to the sourcing of an Andrew Greeley born 1590 in Nottingham, England. It is my opinion that the claim of the same individual (supposed to be the father of Andrew Greele born 1617 who migrated to America and is documented early town records and genealogies), is simply conjecture of some individual or individuals since no verification of documentation can be found to support that claim. Now if that individual can be verified I am willing to change my opinion.

I would agree that no definitive path to the UK from Scandinavia has been established since my terminal SNP TMCRA and has yet to be further defined.

I certainly welcome other individuals to submit their YDNA testing to further establish Andrew Greele's paternal lineage.

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