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Here are the details of an edit by Gillian Causier to the profile of Hugh Bourne.

If serious mistakes were made, you can restore data from as it was 02:35, 6 February 2019.

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Last edited by Wendy Sullivan at 02:35, 6 February 2019.

Changes made by Gillian Causier at 08:07, 6 February 2019.

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In June 1799, Hugh joined the Wesleyans, and attended preaching with zeal, but struggled to remember the content afterwards.<ref> Walford, 1854, pp42-44</ref>
In June 1799, Hugh joined the Wesleyans, and attended preaching with zeal, but struggled to remember the content afterwards.<ref> Walford, 1854, pp42-44</ref>
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1800 saw Hugh working in and around Mow Cop in the Staffordshire moorlands and he was shocked by the "immorality and ungodliness" of the residents. It was rare for a stranger not to be assaulted or at least insulted in the area. This effected him so much that the following year he returned to the area and built a chapel. <ref> Walford, 1854, pp45-48</ref> There was a blacksmith in the area the Hugh often worked with and their conversations often turned to religion. On August 17th 1800<ref> Walford, 1854, p56</ref> Hugh wrote of his own conversion and gave this to the smith. Later the smith in conversation with another local man, a poacher called Daniel Shubotham (who was also a distant cousin of Hugh) referred to this and the impact this had on Daniel was enormous. He went to Hugh to learn more... Hugh's own diary explains that he was sorrowful that he had not been able to express himself as well as he had hoped. The following day he met Daniel again and this time he was able to preach in such a way that Daniel changed his behaviour so much people believed Hugh had driven him mad. <ref> Walford, 1854, pp58-31</ref>
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1800 saw Hugh working in and around Mow Cop in the Staffordshire moorlands and he was shocked by the "immorality and ungodliness" of the residents. It was rare for a stranger not to be assaulted or at least insulted in the area. This effected him so much that the following year he returned to the area and built a chapel. <ref> Walford, 1854, pp45-48</ref> There was a blacksmith in the area that Hugh often worked with and their conversations often turned to religion. On August 17th 1800<ref> Walford, 1854, p56</ref> Hugh wrote of his own conversion and gave this to the smith. Later the smith in conversation with another local man, a poacher called Daniel Shubotham (who was also a distant cousin of Hugh) referred to this and the impact this had on Daniel was enormous. He went to Hugh to learn more... Hugh's own diary explains that he was sorrowful that he had not been able to express himself as well as he had hoped. The following day he met Daniel again and this time he was able to preach in such a way that Daniel changed his behaviour so much people believed Hugh had driven him mad. <ref> Walford, 1854, pp58-31</ref>
Daniel's conversation was the first of many, but perhaps more significantly for Hugh, it was Daniel who convinced him that he should start preaching. "Our chapels were coal pit banks ... we preached gospel to all, good or bad, rough or smooth." <ref> Walford, 1854, p62</ref> These soon became organised prayer meetings,<ref> Walford, 1854, pp 64-69</ref> however Hugh wanted teaching classes to take place too -but the demand was to hear him preach and so at 2pm on Sunday 12 July 1801 he made hist "first attempt" worrying that he may "injure the cause of God" and expecting only a dozen or so people; but so many turned out that the house he planned to use soon filled up and overflowed, so he preached outdoors on what became "the perfect day."<ref>Walford, 1853, pp76-78</ref>
Daniel's conversation was the first of many, but perhaps more significantly for Hugh, it was Daniel who convinced him that he should start preaching. "Our chapels were coal pit banks ... we preached gospel to all, good or bad, rough or smooth." <ref> Walford, 1854, p62</ref> These soon became organised prayer meetings,<ref> Walford, 1854, pp 64-69</ref> however Hugh wanted teaching classes to take place too -but the demand was to hear him preach and so at 2pm on Sunday 12 July 1801 he made hist "first attempt" worrying that he may "injure the cause of God" and expecting only a dozen or so people; but so many turned out that the house he planned to use soon filled up and overflowed, so he preached outdoors on what became "the perfect day."<ref>Walford, 1853, pp76-78</ref>


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