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Here are the details of an edit by M Wright to the profile of John Handsome.

If serious mistakes were made, you can restore data from as it was 04:33, 4 January 2021.

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Last edited by M Wright at 04:33, 4 January 2021.

Changes made by M Wright at 01:06, 22 January 2021.

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'''Bishop Auckland'''
'''Bishop Auckland'''
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The Handsoms probably joined countless others for the Thursday market in Bishop Auckland, less than an hour's walk away. It was a time for selling goods and buying vegetables, fruit and other produce from the district, plus hardware and other essentials. It was also a social occasion, meeting friends and for catching up on news and gossip.
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The Handsoms probably joined countless others for the Thursday market in Bishop Auckland, less than an hour away. It was also a social occasion, meeting friends and for catching up on news and gossip. The town crier would announce market day, and the arrival of bullocks, fat swine, and sheep; oats and barley, both rye and wheat; pigs, goats, and fat capons; butter, cheese, nuts, crabapples, and eggs; green leeks and cherries; farming tools—all for sale at the ringing of the corn-bell. From Silver Street, colliers shout “Buy coals, buy!”, anticipating the great mining industry of the North East. Scavage, or scavell, was a very ancient toll taken from merchants and others for wares exposed for sale within the liberty. The local custom was to exact it in the name of the bailiff or other officer at the ringing of what was called the corn-bell. The seller of corn, or other grain, of oatmeal, and of salt, had to pay a measure from every bushel of twelve gallons. The measure was a reputed pint but in practice was frequently heaped up by the officer. After a dispute over this unfairness in the 17th century the measure became a uniform pint and the corn-bell was henceforth to be rung at noon. If it was not rung, the sellers should be at liberty to begin the sale.
Around 1020 AD King Canute gave it to the Bishop of Durham as a borough following his pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Cuthbert. William Camden wrote, ''The Were after a few miles taketh into him from the South Gaunlesse a riveret, where, at the very meeting of them both together, there standeth upon a high hill Aukland, so called of Okes (like as Sarron in Greece), which sheweth an house of the Bishops stately built with turrets by Anthonie Bec, and withall a beautifull bridge…’'
Around 1020 AD King Canute gave it to the Bishop of Durham as a borough following his pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Cuthbert. William Camden wrote, ''The Were after a few miles taketh into him from the South Gaunlesse a riveret, where, at the very meeting of them both together, there standeth upon a high hill Aukland, so called of Okes (like as Sarron in Greece), which sheweth an house of the Bishops stately built with turrets by Anthonie Bec, and withall a beautifull bridge…’'


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