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Here are the details of an edit by Chad Olivent to the profile of Rebecca Isaake.

If serious mistakes were made, you can restore data from as it was 10:49, 15 January 2019.

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Last edited by Chad Olivent at 10:49, 15 January 2019.

Changes made by Chad Olivent at 10:59, 15 January 2019.

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== Jewish Origins Question ==
== Jewish Origins Question ==
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"The first Jew to set foot on North American soil was probably Elias LeGardo, who sailed to Virginia on the Abilgail in 1621. By 1624 Rebecca Isaake was a resident there."<ref>"First Facts in American Jewish History From 1492 to the Present", by Tina Levitan. Published by Jason Aronson, Inc., Northdale, New Jersey. Page 10</ref> This was written with more zeal than proof.
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Rebecca Issacke was no doubt a beautiful woman. She just was not his wife. Only in recent times has she been put forth as such. The method used to do this was by reasoning with more zeal than proof. She was the perfect fit for a wife of someone who could lay claim to being the first person of Jewish faith in America. Elias LeGarde never claimed this, so no fault of his, nor of Rebecca. If you base someone's Jewishness on their name only, then Rebecca has a better claim than Elias. Still, the damage is done, and she will forever be tied to him as a result. So for posterity's sake, and in pursuit of the truth, wherever it may lead, it is required of us to debunk this notion, and offer up the misleadings, or rather, misreadings of the facts.
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One cannot blame casual writers for copying other works, but the research does not hold up, as a close look at the sources easily show.
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Rebecca was the perfect fit for a wife of someone who could lay claim to being the first person of Jewish faith in America. Elias LeGarde never claimed this, so no fault of his, nor of Rebecca. If you base someone's Jewishness on their name only, then Rebecca has a better claim than Elias. Still, the damage is done, and she will forever be tied to him as a result. So for posterity's sake, and in pursuit of the truth, wherever it may lead, it is required of us to debunk this notion, and offer up the misleadings, or rather, misreadings of the facts.
One has to understand that the English subject writing down the names he is hearing, can only spell what he hears. Ninety percent of the populace was illiterate. It is easy to imagine a Frenchman declaring his name with a strong emphasis on the final 'De' would sound more like 'Da' and be written 'Do'! This is the only instance of the name being spelled this way.
One has to understand that the English subject writing down the names he is hearing, can only spell what he hears. Ninety percent of the populace was illiterate. It is easy to imagine a Frenchman declaring his name with a strong emphasis on the final 'De' would sound more like 'Da' and be written 'Do'! This is the only instance of the name being spelled this way.
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Looking at the preponderance of evidence, he is more likely to be what he is said to be, a French vigneroon, and nothing more. He was not the first Jew in Virginia. The title should find it's rightful owner.
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Looking at the preponderance of evidence, he is more likely to be what he is said to be, a French vigneroon, and nothing more. He was not the first Jew in Virginia. The title should find it's rightful owner, namely Issac Jacob, who was in Northampton County, Virginia in 1664.
This work was cited decades later in the William and Mary Quarterly; then we find Adler's entire essay'' Jews in the American Plantations'' with his by line and the Smithsonian Institution, printed in it's entirety in an immigrant passenger list book. <ref> New World Immigrants: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists and Associated Data from Periodical Literature, Volume 2 1979 http://tinyurl.com/mcloezx </ref> Here at long last, we can see the scholarly shortcuts and misreadings that brought forward this single notion. On page 16 of that work, Adler is shown hard at work making lists of Jewish sounding names, some with descriptions as Jewish, and others just a name, all of which are coming from Hotten. On that page the list is titled ' Musters of the Inhabitants of Virginia 1624-25
This work was cited decades later in the William and Mary Quarterly; then we find Adler's entire essay'' Jews in the American Plantations'' with his by line and the Smithsonian Institution, printed in it's entirety in an immigrant passenger list book. <ref> New World Immigrants: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists and Associated Data from Periodical Literature, Volume 2 1979 http://tinyurl.com/mcloezx </ref> Here at long last, we can see the scholarly shortcuts and misreadings that brought forward this single notion. On page 16 of that work, Adler is shown hard at work making lists of Jewish sounding names, some with descriptions as Jewish, and others just a name, all of which are coming from Hotten. On that page the list is titled ' Musters of the Inhabitants of Virginia 1624-25
The Elizabeth left Ipswitch, Suffolk, England mid April of 1634 with her master, William Andrewes (Andres), arriving in Massachusetts Bay <ref> http://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/elizabeth1.htm</ref>
The Elizabeth left Ipswitch, Suffolk, England mid April of 1634 with her master, William Andrewes (Andres), arriving in Massachusetts Bay <ref> http://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/elizabeth1.htm</ref>
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Rebecca Issacke was 36 years old when she left Ipswich, England and sailed to New England. She never went to Virginia. She never met Elias LaGuarde, and they never married. There is no record yet found showing her arriving in Massachusetts, when the ship landed. Estimates vary, but it is reasonable to assume ten to twenty percent of every ship's passengers died at sea.
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Rebecca Issacke was 36 years old when she left Ipswich, England and sailed to New England. She never went to Virginia. She never met Elias LaGuarde, and they never married. There is no record yet found showing her arriving in Massachusetts, when the ship landed. Estimates vary among scholars, but all agree these crossings were wrought with danger, and sickness was rampant among the passengers. It is reasonable to assume ten to twenty percent of every ship's passengers died at sea.
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That very year a census was held in Masachusetts wherein all inhabitants were counted so that the cattle, which had been held in common up until that point, could be divided equitably amongst the inhabitants. Men, women, and children all were sorted into family groups and written down. There is no Rebecca Issacke. The conclusion most likely is that she died at sea.
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That very year a census was held in Masachusetts wherein all inhabitants were counted so that the cattle, which had been held in common up until that point, could be divided equitably amongst the inhabitants. Men, women, and children all were sorted into family groups and written down. There is no Rebecca Issacke. The obvious conclusion is poor Rebecca most likely she died at sea.
== Sources ==
== Sources ==
=== Notes ===
=== Notes ===
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: Note <span id='N1184'>N1184</span>
 
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: Notes for REBECCA ISAAKE:
It is unknown if Rebecca was Elias' spouse but there is a strong possibility she was came to America because she was betrothed to Elias.
"First Facts in American Jewish History From 1492 to the Present", by Tina Levitan. Published by Jason Aronson, Inc., Northdale, New Jersey. Page 10: "The first Jew to set foot on North American soil was probably Elias LeGardo, who sailed to Virginia on the Abilgail in 1621. By 1624 Rebecca Isaake was a resident there." (Did Rebecca arrive in the colony because she was betrothed to Elias? Remember the Jews were a very close net society and usual married their own.)

More About ELIAS LEGARDE and REBECCA ISAAKE:
Marriage: Bef. 1626, Virginia

Child of ELIAS LEGARDE and REBECCA ISAAKE is:
2. i. THOMAS2 ALLIGOOD/ELLEGOOD, b. Abt. 1627, Buck Roe, Hampton County, Virginia; d. Jul 15, 1689, Northampton County, Virginia.
 


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