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04:48: Chet Ogan edited the Biography and Birth Place for Thomas Ogan (abt.1741-abt.1813). (Bio improvement. ) [Thank Chet for this]

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Last edited by Chet Ogan at 20:10, 20 September 2020.

Changes made by Chet Ogan at 04:48, 3 December 2021.

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[[Category: Siege of Boston]]
[[Category: Siege of Boston]]
== Biography ==
== Biography ==
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Original research by Chet Ogan. [email address removed]
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Original research by Chet Ogan. Oganc(at)sbcglobal.net
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Thomas Ogan was born in 1741 AT SEA and died before 7 December 1813 in Rockingham County, Virginia. His family likely settled in south central Pennsylvania, perhaps Montgomery, Chester, or Lancaster County. According to historian Billie Jo Monger, Thomas Ogan was among several Rockingham County, Virginia, men who fought for Washington both during the French and Indian War and Revolutionary War and who tried to enlist for the War of 1812.
Thomas Ogan was born in 1741 AT SEA and died before 7 December 1813 in Rockingham County, Virginia. His family likely settled in south central Pennsylvania, perhaps Montgomery, Chester, or Lancaster County. According to historian Billie Jo Monger, Thomas Ogan was among several Rockingham County, Virginia, men who fought for Washington both during the French and Indian War and Revolutionary War and who tried to enlist for the War of 1812.
(Source: James Thacher, "Military Journal during the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783".)
(Source: James Thacher, "Military Journal during the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783".)
This unit was chosen in October 1775 to join General Benedict Arnold’s campaign to capture Quebec in conjunction with General Richard Montgomery's campaign to capture Montreal. Though General Montgomery was killed, the campaign for Montreal was successful, whereas the siege of Quebec failed. Many of the expeditionary soldiers were captured at Quebec and held in a convent and monastery: 17 officers and 267 soldiers were returned 11 Sep 1776. For an account of this campaign, read the novel "Arundel" by Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novelist Kenneth Roberts, featuring characters from the town of Arundel, Maine, as he follows many of the main characters who joined Benedict Arnold through many hardships in his march to Quebec during the American Revolution.
This unit was chosen in October 1775 to join General Benedict Arnold’s campaign to capture Quebec in conjunction with General Richard Montgomery's campaign to capture Montreal. Though General Montgomery was killed, the campaign for Montreal was successful, whereas the siege of Quebec failed. Many of the expeditionary soldiers were captured at Quebec and held in a convent and monastery: 17 officers and 267 soldiers were returned 11 Sep 1776. For an account of this campaign, read the novel "Arundel" by Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novelist Kenneth Roberts, featuring characters from the town of Arundel, Maine, as he follows many of the main characters who joined Benedict Arnold through many hardships in his march to Quebec during the American Revolution.
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British General Sir William Howe and General George Washington agreed to an exchange of British and American prisoners captured during the 1775 Canada Campaign. Terms for the exchange included that it would be man-for-man and rank-for-rank; the company commander, name, state of birth, and age was listed for each prisoner. From the document listing these war prisoners captured 31 Dec 1775, at Quebec, and exchanged September 24, 1776 at Elizabeth, New Jersey, Thomas Ogun’s (sic) age was recorded as 24 [the person writing the documentation misunderstood the brogue of many of the men, Ogan was 34 years old], the state of birth was blank, but under the column for notes, was BORN AT SEA. He was listed Captain Matthew Smith’s 6th Company, 1st Pennsylvania Regiment. According to Pennsylvania records, all the men listed in this company roll except one born in Ireland and Thomas Ogan, born at sea, were from the western part of Lancaster County which became Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Captain Daniel Morgan was the senior American officer responsible for the well-being of soldiers and officers held prisoner in Quebec. In the list of Pennsylvania soldiers who served in the Revolution his name was recorded as Thomas Gunn. An age of 24, giving a birth year of 1751, Thomas Ogan would have been too young to have served in the French and Indian War, his age was misunderstood and should have been recorded as age 34. Beginning in 1812 through a series of letters written in his support by officers he served under, Thomas Ogan applied for a pension based on his Revolutionary War service. In November 1813 an affidavit is taken in which Thomas Ogan states he is 72 years old and neither he nor his wife, who is at least 75, can work to support themselves. (This makes his birth in 1741, old enough to serve in the French and Indian War.) On 7 Dec 1813 Thomas Ogan is granted a Memorial Pension- that is after he has died. This makes his birth about 1741, his wife’s birth (Ann or Anna) 1738 or earlier.
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British General Sir William Howe and General George Washington agreed to an exchange of British and American prisoners captured during the 1775 Canada Campaign. Terms for the exchange included that it would be man-for-man and rank-for-rank; the company commander, name, state of birth, and age was listed for each prisoner. From the document listing these war prisoners captured 31 Dec 1775, at Quebec, and exchanged September 24, 1776 at Elizabeth, New Jersey, Thomas Ogun’s (sic) age was recorded as 24 [the person writing the documentation misunderstood the brogue of many of the men, Ogan was 34 years old], the state of birth was blank, but under the column for notes, was BORN AT SEA. He was listed Captain Matthew Smith’s 6th Company, 1st Pennsylvania Regiment. According to Pennsylvania records, all the men listed in this company roll except one born in Ireland and Thomas Ogan, born at sea, were from the western part of Lancaster County which became Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Captain Daniel Morgan was the senior American officer responsible for the well-being of soldiers and officers held prisoner in Quebec. In the list of Pennsylvania soldiers who served in the Revolution his name was recorded as Thomas Gunn. An age of 24, giving a birth year of 1751, Thomas Ogan would have been too young to have served in the French and Indian War, his age was misunderstood and should have been recorded as age 34 (see below). Beginning in 1812 through a series of letters written in his support by officers he served under, Thomas Ogan applied for a pension based on his Revolutionary War service. In November 1813 an affidavit is taken in which Thomas Ogan states he is 72 years old [born 1741] and neither he nor his wife, who is at least 75 [born ca. 1738], can work to support themselves. [This makes him old enough to have served in the French and Indian War.] On 7 Dec 1813 Thomas Ogan is granted a Memorial Pension- that is after he has died.
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Hearing that Thomas Ogan was a prisoner, Anne Ogan moved the family from Lancaster County to Frederick County near Winchester, Virginia, where his brother Peter Ogan and wife Phamy, who married there in 1769, were living. Lieutenant Steele returned his troops from New Jersey to Lancaster Co., PA, about 10 October 1776, Thomas Ogan returned to his family, learning Anne had moved to Virginia. 12 Dec 1776 - Frederick County, Virginia, Thomas Ogan enlists in Capt. William Johnston’s Company of Col. Daniel Morgan’s 11th Continental Line Regiment. Capt. Bryan Bruin in 1785 attests that Thomas Ogan served until the “the latter part of 1781.”
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Hearing that Thomas Ogan was a prisoner, wife Anne Ogan moved the family from Lancaster County to Frederick County near Winchester, Virginia, where his brother Peter Ogan and wife Phamy, who married there in 1769, were living. Lieutenant Steele returned his troops from New Jersey to Lancaster Co., PA, about 10 October 1776, Thomas Ogan returned to his family, learning Anne had moved to Virginia.
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12 Dec 1776 - Frederick County, Virginia, Thomas Ogan enlists in Capt. William Johnston’s Company of Col. Daniel Morgan’s 11th Continental Line Regiment. Capt. Bryan Bruin in 1785 attests that Thomas Ogan served until the “the latter part of 1781.”
From Frederick Co., Virginia, Court Order Books, held at Virginia State Library:
From Frederick Co., Virginia, Court Order Books, held at Virginia State Library:
Notes of John H. Warvel, Jr. M.D., 10951 E. Mallard Way, Indianapolis, IN 46278
Notes of John H. Warvel, Jr. M.D., 10951 E. Mallard Way, Indianapolis, IN 46278
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email [email address removed] dated 7 March 2000
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email johnw(at)in.net dated 7 March 2000
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In his note he states that he was given some of his info on the other children of James and Sarah Lilly from Mrs. Billie Jo Monger of Elkton, VA, who has done several books.
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In his note he states that he was given some of his info on the other children of James and Sarah Lilly from Mrs. Billie Jo Monger of Elkton, VA, who has done several books on Rockingham County history.
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Gwathmeys (1938) Hist. Reg. of Virginians in the Revolution lists Thomas Ogan from 1777 to 1781 on the muster roles of the 11th, 15th, and 7th Virginia Continental Line of Morgan's Riflemen as a wagoner under the command of Brigadier General Daniel Morgan. Thomas Ogan spent part of the winter of 1777- 1778 (March, April, May 1778) at Valley Forge, PA. according to the muster rolls at the National Archives and records at Valley Forge National Historic Park.
Gwathmeys (1938) Hist. Reg. of Virginians in the Revolution lists Thomas Ogan from 1777 to 1781 on the muster roles of the 11th, 15th, and 7th Virginia Continental Line of Morgan's Riflemen as a wagoner under the command of Brigadier General Daniel Morgan. Thomas Ogan spent part of the winter of 1777- 1778 (March, April, May 1778) at Valley Forge, PA. according to the muster rolls at the National Archives and records at Valley Forge National Historic Park.
Rockingham County was part of Augusta County until 1777 when it was split up into Rockingham Co. and Hampshire Co., VA (later WV). Most of Rockingham County’s records were destroyed by fire during the Civil War.
Rockingham County was part of Augusta County until 1777 when it was split up into Rockingham Co. and Hampshire Co., VA (later WV). Most of Rockingham County’s records were destroyed by fire during the Civil War.
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On page 49 of Strickler’s Tenth Legion Tithables it states that on June 4th, 1864, the County records for Rockingham County were removed by the Clerk of the Court House for safety. On the road leading ip the east side of South River about two miles above Port republic, near the residence of J. W. Wisner, and burned by the Federalists who, it is said, thought that they were valuable war papers. They were extinguished but not without great damage. Nearly all the wills and administration settlements were wholly or partly burned. The deeds fared better, a number of them remaining.
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On page 49 of Strickler’s Tenth Legion Tithables it states that on June 4th, 1864, the County records for Rockingham County were removed by the Clerk of the Court House for safety. On the road leading up the east side of South River about two miles above Port republic, near the residence of J. W. Wisner, and burned by the Federalists who, it is said, thought that they were valuable war papers. They were extinguished but not without great damage. Nearly all the wills and administration settlements were wholly or partly burned. The deeds fared better, a number of them remaining. [We have Thomas Ogan's deed but unfortunately not his will, therefore DAR will not accept him as a Revolutionary patriot because he names no children.]
WHERE WERE THE ROCKINGHAM RECORDS BURNED? On June the 4th, 1864, the County records of the County were removed by the Clerk from the Court House for safety. They were overtaken on the road leading up east side of the South River about two miles above Port Republic, near the residence of J. W. Wisner, 1885, and burned by the Federals who, it is said, thot that they were valuable war papers. They were extinguished but not until great damage had been done. Nearly all the wills and administration settlements were wholly or partly burned- The deeds fared better, quite a number of them remaining. Ref: Strickler’s (1930) Tenth Legion Tithables.
WHERE WERE THE ROCKINGHAM RECORDS BURNED? On June the 4th, 1864, the County records of the County were removed by the Clerk from the Court House for safety. They were overtaken on the road leading up east side of the South River about two miles above Port Republic, near the residence of J. W. Wisner, 1885, and burned by the Federals who, it is said, thot that they were valuable war papers. They were extinguished but not until great damage had been done. Nearly all the wills and administration settlements were wholly or partly burned- The deeds fared better, quite a number of them remaining. Ref: Strickler’s (1930) Tenth Legion Tithables.
Birth Location
- At Sea + At Sea- Atlantic Ocean


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