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20:10: Chet Ogan edited the Biography for Thomas Ogan (abt.1741-abt.1813). (Editorial- spelling, punctuation, fixing typos. Clarification of facts.) [Thank Chet for this]

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Last edited by Chet Ogan at 06:51, 8 September 2019.

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On July 28, 1775 Thomas Ogan enlisted into Captain Matthew Smith's Company, Cmpy I (6th Company of the 1st Pennsylvania Regiment, Colonel William Thompson's Rifle Battalions), which was recruited from the part of Lancaster County which in 1785 became Dauphin County. Recruited by July 28, 1775, after a swift 10-day 400 mile march from Pennsylvania, the unit was at Boston on August 7, 1775. They first saw action at the Siege of Boston.
On July 28, 1775 Thomas Ogan enlisted into Captain Matthew Smith's Company, Cmpy I (6th Company of the 1st Pennsylvania Regiment, Colonel William Thompson's Rifle Battalions), which was recruited from the part of Lancaster County which in 1785 became Dauphin County. Recruited by July 28, 1775, after a swift 10-day 400 mile march from Pennsylvania, the unit was at Boston on August 7, 1775. They first saw action at the Siege of Boston.
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What were these riflemen like: We have this description:
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What were these riflemen like? We have this description:
Doctor James Thacher, a young doctor from Barnstable who observed the regiment during August 1775, provided this description.
Doctor James Thacher, a young doctor from Barnstable who observed the regiment during August 1775, provided this description.
"They are remarkably stout and hardy men, many of then
"They are remarkably stout and hardy men, many of then
distance of common musket shot."
distance of common musket shot."
(Source: James Thacher, "Military Journal during the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783".)
(Source: James Thacher, "Military Journal during the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783".)
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This unit was chosen in October 1775 to join General Benedict Arnold’s campaign to capture Quebec in conjunction with General Richard Montgomery's campaign to capture Montreal. Though General Montgomery was killed, the campaign for Montreal was successful, whereas the siege of Quebec failed. Many of the expeditionary soldiers were captured at Quebec and held in a convent and monastery: 17 officers and 267 soldiers were returned. For an account of this campaign, read the novel Arundel by Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novelist Kenneth Roberts, featuring characters from the town of Arundel, Maine as he follows many of the main characters who joined Benedict Arnold through many hardships in his march to Quebec during the American Revolution.
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This unit was chosen in October 1775 to join General Benedict Arnold’s campaign to capture Quebec in conjunction with General Richard Montgomery's campaign to capture Montreal. Though General Montgomery was killed, the campaign for Montreal was successful, whereas the siege of Quebec failed. Many of the expeditionary soldiers were captured at Quebec and held in a convent and monastery: 17 officers and 267 soldiers were returned 11 Sep 1776. For an account of this campaign, read the novel "Arundel" by Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novelist Kenneth Roberts, featuring characters from the town of Arundel, Maine, as he follows many of the main characters who joined Benedict Arnold through many hardships in his march to Quebec during the American Revolution.
British General Sir William Howe and General George Washington agreed to an exchange of British and American prisoners captured during the 1775 Canada Campaign. Terms for the exchange included that it would be man-for-man and rank-for-rank; the company commander, name, state of birth, and age was listed for each prisoner. From the document listing these war prisoners captured 31 Dec 1775, at Quebec, and exchanged September 24, 1776 at Elizabeth, New Jersey, Thomas Ogun’s (sic) age was recorded as 24 [the person writing the documentation misunderstood the brogue of many of the men, Ogan was 34 years old], the state of birth was blank, but under the column for notes, was BORN AT SEA. He was listed Captain Matthew Smith’s 6th Company, 1st Pennsylvania Regiment. According to Pennsylvania records, all the men listed in this company roll except one born in Ireland and Thomas Ogan, born at sea, were from the western part of Lancaster County which became Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Captain Daniel Morgan was the senior American officer responsible for the well-being of soldiers and officers held prisoner in Quebec. In the list of Pennsylvania soldiers who served in the Revolution his name was recorded as Thomas Gunn. An age of 24, giving a birth year of 1751, Thomas Ogan would have been too young to have served in the French and Indian War, his age was misunderstood and should have been recorded as age 34. Beginning in 1812 through a series of letters written in his support by officers he served under, Thomas Ogan applied for a pension based on his Revolutionary War service. In November 1813 an affidavit is taken in which Thomas Ogan states he is 72 years old and neither he nor his wife, who is at least 75, can work to support themselves. (This makes his birth in 1741, old enough to serve in the French and Indian War.) On 7 Dec 1813 Thomas Ogan is granted a Memorial Pension- that is after he has died. This makes his birth about 1741, his wife’s birth (Ann or Anna) 1738 or earlier.
British General Sir William Howe and General George Washington agreed to an exchange of British and American prisoners captured during the 1775 Canada Campaign. Terms for the exchange included that it would be man-for-man and rank-for-rank; the company commander, name, state of birth, and age was listed for each prisoner. From the document listing these war prisoners captured 31 Dec 1775, at Quebec, and exchanged September 24, 1776 at Elizabeth, New Jersey, Thomas Ogun’s (sic) age was recorded as 24 [the person writing the documentation misunderstood the brogue of many of the men, Ogan was 34 years old], the state of birth was blank, but under the column for notes, was BORN AT SEA. He was listed Captain Matthew Smith’s 6th Company, 1st Pennsylvania Regiment. According to Pennsylvania records, all the men listed in this company roll except one born in Ireland and Thomas Ogan, born at sea, were from the western part of Lancaster County which became Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. Captain Daniel Morgan was the senior American officer responsible for the well-being of soldiers and officers held prisoner in Quebec. In the list of Pennsylvania soldiers who served in the Revolution his name was recorded as Thomas Gunn. An age of 24, giving a birth year of 1751, Thomas Ogan would have been too young to have served in the French and Indian War, his age was misunderstood and should have been recorded as age 34. Beginning in 1812 through a series of letters written in his support by officers he served under, Thomas Ogan applied for a pension based on his Revolutionary War service. In November 1813 an affidavit is taken in which Thomas Ogan states he is 72 years old and neither he nor his wife, who is at least 75, can work to support themselves. (This makes his birth in 1741, old enough to serve in the French and Indian War.) On 7 Dec 1813 Thomas Ogan is granted a Memorial Pension- that is after he has died. This makes his birth about 1741, his wife’s birth (Ann or Anna) 1738 or earlier.
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Thomas Ogan moved his family from Lancaster County to Frederick County near Winchester, Virginia, where his brother Peter Ogan and wife Phamy, who married there in 1769, were living. 12 Dec 1776 - Frederick County, Virginia, Thomas Ogan enlists in Capt. William Johnston’s Company of Col. Daniel Morgan’s 11th Continental Line Regiment. Benjamin Bruin in 1785 attests that Thomas Ogan served until the “the latter part of 1781.”
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Hearing that Thomas Ogan was a prisoner, Anne Ogan moved the family from Lancaster County to Frederick County near Winchester, Virginia, where his brother Peter Ogan and wife Phamy, who married there in 1769, were living. Lieutenant Steele returned his troops from New Jersey to Lancaster Co., PA, about 10 October 1776, Thomas Ogan returned to his family, learning Anne had moved to Virginia. 12 Dec 1776 - Frederick County, Virginia, Thomas Ogan enlists in Capt. William Johnston’s Company of Col. Daniel Morgan’s 11th Continental Line Regiment. Capt. Bryan Bruin in 1785 attests that Thomas Ogan served until the “the latter part of 1781.”
From Frederick Co., Virginia, Court Order Books, held at Virginia State Library:
From Frederick Co., Virginia, Court Order Books, held at Virginia State Library:
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5 Aug 1777: p. 454: “On application of Ann Ogan whose husband is a soldier in the 11th Virginia Regiment setting forth that she with six children destitute of the common necessaries of life, and unable to support themselves as the eldest is but nine years old and praying that the court would take her into consideration the same being made to appear to the satisfaction of the court. It is their opinion that they ought to br allowed 10 pounds for her immediate relief agreeable to an act of General Assembly. Present William Gibbs. Absent Philip Bush.”
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5 Aug 1777: p. 454: “On application of Ann Ogan whose husband is a soldier in the 11th Virginia Regiment setting forth that she with six children destitute of the common necessaries of life, and unable to support themselves as the eldest is but nine years old and praying that the court would take her into consideration the same being made to appear to the satisfaction of the court. It is their opinion that they ought to be allowed 10 pounds for her immediate relief agreeable to an act of General Assembly. Present William Gibbs. Absent Philip Bush.”
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3 Aug 1779: p. 188: "On the application of Ann Ogan setting forth that she is the wife of [not named] Ogan who is a soldier in Col Morgan's Redgment in the Continental Army and that she has seven children, and destitute of support on consideration whereof it is the opinion of the court that she ought to be allowed 30 pounds for their support for the ensuing year which is ordered to be certified."
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3 Aug 1779: p. 188: "On the application of Ann Ogan setting forth that she is the wife of [not named to protect the soldier's identity] Ogan who is a soldier in Col Morgan's Redgment in the Continental Army and that she has seven children, and destitute of support on consideration whereof it is the opinion of the court that she ought to be allowed 30 pounds for their support for the ensuing year which is ordered to be certified."
2 Aug 1780: p. 355: "On the application of Ann Ougan setting forth that her husband is a soldier in the Continental Army and that she is unable to support herself and her 4 small children. On consideration whereof the court are of the opinion that she ought to be allowed the sum of 105 pounds of pork for the subsistence of herself and children the ensuing year, which is ordered to be certified."
2 Aug 1780: p. 355: "On the application of Ann Ougan setting forth that her husband is a soldier in the Continental Army and that she is unable to support herself and her 4 small children. On consideration whereof the court are of the opinion that she ought to be allowed the sum of 105 pounds of pork for the subsistence of herself and children the ensuing year, which is ordered to be certified."
From Old Tenth Legion marriages- Marriages in Rockingham County, Virginia from 1778 to 1816. Compiled by Harry M. Strickland, 1928 (Gen Publ Co, 1976)
From Old Tenth Legion marriages- Marriages in Rockingham County, Virginia from 1778 to 1816. Compiled by Harry M. Strickland, 1928 (Gen Publ Co, 1976)
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Lists bride’s ( Sarah Ogan’s father) as Tom Gogan, Surety bond held by father. Marriage June 30, Wm Lilly to Sarah Ogogan, clerk’s certificate..
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Lists bride’s ( Sarah Ogan’s father) as Tom Gogan, Surety bond held by father. Marriage June 30, Wm Lilly to Sarah Ogogan, clerk’s certificate. [Chet's note- notice that Thomas Ogan had a brogue based on the spelling in the documents].
“Johannes Werbel and his descendants- The Warble-Warvel Family History 1740- 1991” by John H. Warvel and Ralph Morton- 650 pages.
“Johannes Werbel and his descendants- The Warble-Warvel Family History 1740- 1991” by John H. Warvel and Ralph Morton- 650 pages.
Gwathmeys (1938) Hist. Reg. of Virginians in the Revolution lists Thomas Ogan from 1777 to 1781 on the muster roles of the 11th, 15th, and 7th Virginia Continental Line of Morgan's Riflemen as a wagoner under the command of Brigadier General Daniel Morgan. Thomas Ogan spent part of the winter of 1777- 1778 (March, April, May 1778) at Valley Forge, PA. according to the muster rolls at the National Archives and records at Valley Forge National Historic Park.
Gwathmeys (1938) Hist. Reg. of Virginians in the Revolution lists Thomas Ogan from 1777 to 1781 on the muster roles of the 11th, 15th, and 7th Virginia Continental Line of Morgan's Riflemen as a wagoner under the command of Brigadier General Daniel Morgan. Thomas Ogan spent part of the winter of 1777- 1778 (March, April, May 1778) at Valley Forge, PA. according to the muster rolls at the National Archives and records at Valley Forge National Historic Park.
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12 Aug 1785 200 acre Land Warrant No. 3956 for 200 acres due for services in the Virginia Continental Line assigned to Eddy Valentine who transferred the voucher to William Reynolds, who used the voucher to get warrant land in Kentucky.
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12 Aug 1785 200 acre Land Warrant No. 3956 for 200 acres due for services in the Virginia Continental Line assigned to Edwd Valentine who transferred the voucher to William Reynolds, who used the voucher to get warrant land in Kentucky.
On 26 Apr 1788, page 88 of the Deeds Book, Rockingham Co. Courthouse, a deed is given to Thomas Ogan for 98 acres adjoining Eliot Retherford, Benson, Dutch Lord, Hite, and Harrison. Survey was recorded by Jnl Lincoln and done by Alexander Herring SRC, . This is in the area of Smith and Cook Creek, Mill Creek, and Cub Run. According to a researcher on the Lilly line, the homestead was near McGaheysville, near Elkton west of the Blue Ridge Mtns. Strickler’s book indicates Thomas Ogan’s land was part of Harrison’s land and was near Old Indian Trail. (The land that Thomas Ogan bought was surveyed by the great-grandfather of President Abraham Lincoln)
On 26 Apr 1788, page 88 of the Deeds Book, Rockingham Co. Courthouse, a deed is given to Thomas Ogan for 98 acres adjoining Eliot Retherford, Benson, Dutch Lord, Hite, and Harrison. Survey was recorded by Jnl Lincoln and done by Alexander Herring SRC, . This is in the area of Smith and Cook Creek, Mill Creek, and Cub Run. According to a researcher on the Lilly line, the homestead was near McGaheysville, near Elkton west of the Blue Ridge Mtns. Strickler’s book indicates Thomas Ogan’s land was part of Harrison’s land and was near Old Indian Trail. (The land that Thomas Ogan bought was surveyed by the great-grandfather of President Abraham Lincoln)


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